Why Are Pull-ups Bad?

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417PlacesToGo

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I saw another topic concerning more interesting designs for adult pull-up diapers. That's an interesting topic, but it got me thinking about the fact that pull-up diapers are generally worse in quality/capacity than conventional tape on diapers.

My question is, why is this the case? Does the construction of pull-ups make them unsuitable for high capacity? It's really odd to me. There has to be a reason for it.
 

PaddedBass92

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With pull-up style diapers they are going for a more discrete profile as opposed to something with high capacity.
 

caitianx

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Pull-ups only have a small urine absorbing capacity.
At best, a single wetting.
 

Akastus

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I saw another topic concerning more interesting designs for adult pull-up diapers. That's an interesting topic, but it got me thinking about the fact that pull-up diapers are generally worse in quality/capacity than conventional tape on diapers.

My question is, why is this the case? Does the construction of pull-ups make them unsuitable for high capacity? It's really odd to me. There has to be a reason for it.

The main problem is that the elastic components of pull-ups tend to lose their elasticity within a few hours, especially under the strain of holding up saturated padding, and they thus start to sag. This is especially a problem when you consider that whether pull-up or taped, there are relatively few sizes of nappies, which means that each size has to cover a fairly wide waist circumference range - which means that pull-ups have to stretch quite a bit when put on, in many cases. Non-elastic plastic and tapes hold up far better under strain.
 

LittleAaron

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They do not stay in position.

If you are out in public, you have to completely take off your pants and shoes to change them.

I have tried the Depends Adjustable and Assurance Underwear for Men. . .neither had leak guards that I thought could do anything. . .at least compared to the Assurance Briefs.

In my honest opinion, pull ups are for those who need protection for just in case something happens and intend to use the toilet wherever possible. Whereas those who need and use a tape on diaper, expect that once they put one on, it is going to be used and will only be taken off when changed.

Some pull-ups you can get away with using like a tape-on diaper in situation where you want to be especially discrete and know you will be able to change often, but often will not last long if you have completely no control.

The companies consider this and they design there products with those functions in mind.
 

Rob110

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I tried pullups when si first started to deal with my bladder issue and found the leak when you flood, taped diapers have proven to be more reliable, if you just have a small trickle issue then pull ups may be fine but for the most part you can't beat a premium plastic backed diaper
 

bambinod

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I tried pullups when si first started to deal with my bladder issue and found the leak when you flood, taped diapers have proven to be more reliable, if you just have a small trickle issue then pull ups may be fine but for the most part you can't beat a premium plastic backed diaper

If you're still interested in pullups, you might want to try a sample of northshore's. They have fast wicking, thick padding, and excellent standing leak guards. (and the elastic of a tube sock...)
 

INTrePid

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I've always wondered this too. Why can't a company produce a pull-up with the same absorbency as a tape-on? Is it really just the elastic that is the limiting factor? Has anyone ever experimented and put a ton of stuffers in a premium pull-up like an Abena Abri-Flex?
 

MetalMann

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They are meant for medium incontinence. People who leak when they sneeze, cough, and ect. They would be difficult for people who need heavy protection because of frequent changing. Pull ups don't make sense for people who need to change more often, they would have to get half naked including shoes in a restroom which is gross. Instead they can wear these all day unless a change is needed. They can make it to the bathroom most of the time, it's just the small spurts of urine that tend to escape when some physical action temporarily opens the bladder briefly.

I'd also like to add they they have a narrow crotch. None of the really nestle my package very well and my package is quite on the small side.

Regarding the padding, they are quite thin and are meant for discretion. The gender specific ones are even worse. They have zoned padding, rendering the rest of the product useless. The male ones have almost no padding in the back of the garment. If you're laying down on your back or just sitting back, you have a very high risk of leaks. Especially for people like us who tend to flood. They are meant for light to medium incontinence.

Some of them feature leak guards but are pretty useless and very short. These products tend to sag pretty badly when used. They end up finding themselves in one leg hole and walking becomes awkward.
 

INTrePid

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They are meant for medium incontinence. People who leak when they sneeze, cough, and ect. They would be difficult for people who need heavy protection because of frequent changing. Pull ups don't make sense for people who need to change more often, they would have to get half naked including shoes in a restroom which is gross. Instead they can wear these all day unless a change is needed. They can make it to the bathroom most of the time, it's just the small spurts of urine that tend to escape when some physical action temporarily opens the bladder briefly.

I'd also like to add they they have a narrow crotch. None of the really nestle my package very well and my package is quite on the small side.

Regarding the padding, they are quite thin and are meant for discretion. The gender specific ones are even worse. They have zoned padding, rendering the rest of the product useless. The male ones have almost no padding in the back of the garment. If you're laying down on your back or just sitting back, you have a very high risk of leaks. Especially for people like us who tend to flood. They are meant for light to medium incontinence.

Some of them feature leak guards but are pretty useless and very short. These products tend to sag pretty badly when used. They end up finding themselves in one leg hole and walking becomes awkward.

Yes, pretty much all pull-ups on the market today are meant for medium incontinence, but that still doesn't answer OPs question which is why a company couldn't in theory produce a pull-up meant for heavy incontinence. Did anyone actually read the OP?

You're also right that pull-ups don't make sense for people who need to change more often, but the counterargument is that they wouldn't need to change so often if the pull-ups were more absorbent. There's no law that says pull-ups must have a narrow crotch or must have crappy leak guards or that they must be intended to be discreet or that they must necessarily be less absorbent than a tape-on. Maybe there is some material limitation that limits the absorbency like the elastic but I've yet to see a good explanation of one.
 

bambinod

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I've always wondered this too. Why can't a company produce a pull-up with the same absorbency as a tape-on? Is it really just the elastic that is the limiting factor? Has anyone ever experimented and put a ton of stuffers in a premium pull-up like an Abena Abri-Flex?

I could see a couple problems right off the bat. First off, you have to make a product that works for a wide range of sizes, without being adjustable. There are no tapes to move. So it has to work for someone at the low end of the range as well as at the high end.

The other issue is one of weight. Anyone that's tried to walk around with just a wet diaper on knows those things like to migrate south and fall around your ankles if you let them. This problem is worse with pullups because they can keep stretching and stretching and slide down. So you can't just keep adding padding, there is an upper practical limit.
 

ARBO

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I used to wear the highest capacity pull up with two max stuffers at night, with tight plastic pants. Did a fair job but nowhere near the capacity of taped nappies with same stuffers.
 

ARBO

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I am fed up with taped nappies, I am always prone to leaks at the back of the legs. And application is too variable.
I have used Abena M3 pull ups at night with 2 pairs of tight plastic pants. They last 10 hours without leakage if I use 2 stuffers of c.1000ml each. Any longer, any less, then I get leaks into my pants. I have tried the pull ups, without stuffers, inside a taped nappy. Waste of a nappy as once the gel is used in the pull up it becomes impermeable! Expensive solution anyway!

Trying to find a "perfect "solution for 12 hours at night. Always go on my back and release as slowly as I can.
 

bambinod

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I am fed up with taped nappies, I am always prone to leaks at the back of the legs. And application is too variable.
I have used Abena M3 pull ups at night with 2 pairs of tight plastic pants. They last 10 hours without leakage if I use 2 stuffers of c.1000ml each. Any longer, any less, then I get leaks into my pants. I have tried the pull ups, without stuffers, inside a taped nappy. Waste of a nappy as once the gel is used in the pull up it becomes impermeable! Expensive solution anyway!

It's a matter of understanding wicking. Like you've found, all that SAP isn't useful if it forms a dam in the padding, preventing wetness from moving to dry areas of the pad.

Avoid diapers that swell a lot, because those are the ones with high sap. Look for diapers that are thicker to start with. Bambino Teddy is a good example, so are the comficare varieties. All of those start out thick, and while they do swell, it's not to triple their original size. This means there's more pulp in there to move the wetness around.

Those two sets also have better "corner coverage" - I'm referring to the back outside of the legs where you are getting your leaks when I say "corners". That's a very common place for diapers to leak, whether standing or laying on your back. Besides choosing a diaper that widens out rapidly out of the crotch to better cover the corners, the leak guards help too.

There's a third thing that can really help corner leaks. After you put on your diaper, look in the mirror at the back. Is there a deep crease between your butt cheeks? That's a bad thing. Unfortunately, it can be a challenge to prevent, especially during the day. The problem it's creating is that wetness that goes down into the crotch is channelled away from the center of the diaper as it heads to the back, and out to the sides, towards the corners. Spend some time working with your diaper as you are putting it on, pulling the corners IN a bit, and squaring out the back, so you have an unbroken "V" outward in the diaper, from front, through crotch, way into the back. That will REALLY help with your corner leaks. You may need to change your lower tape position a little.

I may add a few pics to my gallery here illustrating this later. It'd be peachy if they'd fix the inline images here.
 

DLScottsman

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The ABU Space diaper would be good for your long night. They are wide and thick and very comfortable. If your diapers are opening near the back of your leg you might need to go down in size or tape up leaning against a wall. I have found with the space diaper I need the back slightly higher in the back.
 
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