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What Book are you reading now??

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Siege89

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Well the title is simple, What book are you reading right now.

I just picked up the Terry Goodkind ~ Sword of Truth.

I've been through the books a few times already. They are a long read, 11 books an about 500-800 pages a book. I'm a slow reader but I make it through them.

They are a mid evil type setting, An about two people that are truly in love. But are ripped apart bye the evil of the world. An when all seems lost. They still do what must be done. To protect they world they live in. Even it if cost there own life. But with the help of some very amazing friend's they some how manage to come out on top.

From the very first book up until the last, You cant seem to put the book down. Not until ever loss end has been cleaned up. An I have to say that Terry Goodkind has done a great job of that. Just when you think you have everything figured out. Your wrong, The ending is truly wroth the journey.

But I could go on forever about this book. But if I say anymore I might give up some details :( Plus I dont think this small post could ever do the book any true justice. I can say that been moved in very powerful ways bye this book in my own life.
 
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Falkio

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Becoming Madame Mao by Anchee Min.

Very interesting read! It will teach you a thing or two about humility. Everything is worded in an odd way, though.
 
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China Miéville: Iron Council. I'm loving it so far, it's always enjoyable to find truly unique fantasy. The setting alone feels quite refreshening, it's a sort of early-industrialized world with a cyberpunk twist and some really crackpot species to boot :D Quite a far cry from the standard copy of medieval Europe..

I also have Arcana & Rota, a poem collection by A.W Yrjänä as side reading. Also liking him a lot.

For anyone interested in more mature fantasy I would also recomend Steph Swainston and Jeff Vandermeer in addition to Miéville. Great stuff!
 

LittleMonster

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A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

Blowing my mind right about now. >.>
It's a great book, I'd recommend it if you're into dystopian reads.
 
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Lincoln by David Herbert Donald. So far, a fascinating read, I never new that Pres. Lincoln was so conflicted on the issue of slavery. On one hand, he felt that all men are created equal, but that blacks could never be the social and intellectual equal of whites. On the ending of slavery, he felt that it should be stopped, but couldn't think of a way that would not destroy the Union. Preservation of the Union was his highest priority, even when he was in the House.

Before that, I read Lies My Teacher Told Me by James Loewen. I highly recommend this book to anyone that has ever sat through an American History Class.
 

dogboy

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I'm reading two books at the moment. One is "Pilgrim At Tinker Creek" by Annie Dillard. I finished "The Writing Life" by her. "Pilgrim" is about her reflections while living at Hollands College in Roanoke, VA, close to where I live. I believe it was her first major book, and right out of the shoot, she won a Pulitzer Prize. It read like poetry. In "The Writing Life" she talks about paying attention to each sentence. I would say that every sentence she writes is brilliant.

The other book which I'm reading is "Red Earth, White Lies" by Vine Deloria, Jr. He's a Native American, and his book dis spells the myth about Paleo Indians coming to North American by the Bering Straight land bridge. He points out, as did Thor Hierdahl, that earlier man built small water craft and explored much of the world. If Lief Erickson could come to this continent by boat, so could paleo Indian. If that's so, then they were here a much longer time, making their almost extermination all the more terrible. Europeans used the argument to displace Indians that they were here not much longer than the western settlers, but Deloria makes a case that Indians where here at least 45,000 years ago. He also argues against the theory that we evolved from Cro-Magnon Man. He sees the many early species of man such as Homo Erectus, Java, Peking, Neanderthars as evolutionary dead ends.

Both of these books are difficult reads. I tend to re-read sentences and paragraphs, but they are serving a purpose as I am writing a book.
 

Dawes

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A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

Blowing my mind right about now. >.>
It's a great book, I'd recommend it if you're into dystopian reads.
Did you get it with Brave New World: Revisited? He wrote Revisited as a follow-up essay to it some time after the book was published, and it's amazing to see just how he managed to foreshadow so many developments in the world with his original work. It's an educational (if not a bit self-enthusastic) read! Island was also a great book, too!

For the moment, I'm reading Jim Butcher's Small Favor, which is book ten in The Dresden Files. Butcher's writing has gotten exponentially better over the course of the series, and Harry Dresden is just too goddamned good a main character for me to not want to read more about! I love his detective noir/modern fantasy world.

After Small Favor, I'll be moving onto Turn Coat, which is the next book in the series. Then I think I'm going to grab a non-fiction book for my monthly educational reading. >,<
 

Jaiden

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I just finished The Great Gatsby last night and very much enjoyed it. I'm sure most people are familiar with it so won't go into details.

Not sure what is next though I do have a bit of a hankering to re-read To Kill A Mocking Bird. Classic book and only read it the once a good six or so years ago, so it'll be relatively fresh to me. I did also order Persepolis - the graphic novel/comic by Marjane Satrapi about her childhood in the Iranian Revolution - the other day after hearing so many recommendations for it, so that might be next if it arrives soon.

This (pretty much identical) thread is still alive if any one feels like merging them, incidentally.
 

Lightning

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Angels and Deamons by Dan Brown.
Yes I know it's been out for ages, but after I saw the movie I thought: 'Right, I'm reading this book!'
And I have to say, it is one of the best books I have read.
 

Aki

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Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.
Thought it was time for me to finally read this. xD Though I really want to read Good Omens.
 

mizzycub

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First Amongst Sequels by Jasper Fforde. It is the fifth in the Thursday Next series about ... well about books. It is a mixture of thriller, cop drama comedy and meta - literature. Some passages are absolutely hilarious and most of it is funny, if even in a subtle way. I would recommend you read through the series, starting at The Eyre Affair. They do make lots of literary references but don't worry, I'm not that widely read and I can enjoy them, so so can you!
 

LittleMonster

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I'm reading two books at the moment. One is "Pilgrim At Tinker Creek" by Annie Dillard. I finished "The Writing Life" by her. "Pilgrim" is about her reflections while living at Hollands College in Roanoke, VA, close to where I live. I believe it was her first major book, and right out of the shoot, she won a Pulitzer Prize. It read like poetry. In "The Writing Life" she talks about paying attention to each sentence. I would say that every sentence she writes is brilliant.
I love love love Pilgrim. I was first introduced to her last year and I just love the way she writes.

dawes said:
Did you get it with Brave New World: Revisited? He wrote Revisited as a follow-up essay to it some time after the book was published, and it's amazing to see just how he managed to foreshadow so many developments in the world with his original work. It's an educational (if not a bit self-enthusastic) read! Island was also a great book, too!
I'll definitely have to look into those. :3
 

Siege89

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This (pretty much identical) thread is still alive if any one feels like merging them, incidentally.
Sorry I ran a search but got nothing...

Beside's 1 very old thread
And your isnt dead yet. But hasn't had a post in a while, not trying to hyjack it. But a refresh might be nice. Some people do start reading new books.
 
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A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.

Blowing my mind right about now. >.>
It's a great book, I'd recommend it if you're into dystopian reads.
Same hear! High five!

Just finished reading White Lines Fever also, the auto-biography by Lemmy Kilmister of Motörhead!
 

Jaiden

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First Amongst Sequels by Jasper Fforde. It is the fifth in the Thursday Next series about ... well about books. It is a mixture of thriller, cop drama comedy and meta - literature. Some passages are absolutely hilarious and most of it is funny, if even in a subtle way. I would recommend you read through the series, starting at The Eyre Affair. They do make lots of literary references but don't worry, I'm not that widely read and I can enjoy them, so so can you!
I really like those books. I've only read a couple and not in order - First Among Sequels and...hm, Lost in a Good Book, I think? Something like that. I may be loosing something in not having read them chronologically but they're so surreal that I just went with it and found them genuinely funny and charming.

They're quite reminiscent of Terry Pratchett with the absurdism and fantasy-comedy settings and I just love all the weird little details and sub-plots he fits into his world - the Whig Party still being in power, cheese being being a sought-after smuggling material and such. All that good old fashioned daftness plus a huge dollop of very clever literary referencing (most of which probably passes me by, no doubt) works very well.

Sorry I ran a search but got nothing...

Beside's 1 very old thread
And your isnt dead yet. But hasn't had a post in a while, not trying to hyjack it. But a refresh might be nice. Some people do start reading new books.
Oh, it's quite all right, no need to apologise or anything. I was just reminded of the thread when I saw this one and mentioned it because, well, I thought of it.

Anything that gets people talking books is always fine in my...book. *ahem*
 
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