Wetting and not remembering

lilshelly

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  1. Little
  2. Incontinent
I am functionally incontinent I still can go to the bathroom when I am at home. I have issues when I go out or don't have quick access to the bathroom.
I know when I have to go and I can feel myself go but there are times when I can't remember going until I check myself. Is this common even if you are aware that you wet?
 
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I does happen, My incon is rathed mixed, at times I can feel the wetness coming out, other times, don't feel a thing but my diaper is clearly wet.
Been like that for me many years now.
 
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I tend to be on the haven't a clue side, but can sometimes pick-up on the warmth /weight in the lower diaper area. Been like that for a very longtime with no difference seen. It is possible that low flow rate is not alerting you that you have or are wetting? When your are not aware, how could you remember?
 
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Jorelaxed said:
My incontinence is rather mixed, at times I can feel the wetness coming out, other times, don't feel a thing but my diaper is clearly wet.
My flow usually is already going when I notice it, if I notice it at all. For that reason and others, I am diapered up 24/7.
 
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Yep, and it’s happening more frequently as my urge incontinence worsens. I’m wetting progressively smaller amounts more frequently. Similar to others here, I have mixed incontinence and my symptoms are all over the place. Usually I can tell when I’m peeing, but sometimes I don’t pay attentions and I’m surprised to see that I’m wet.

It mostly happens when I’m standing and working on a project and in the zone. I may or may not have a fuzzy recollection that I wet at some point in the not too distant past, but I couldn’t tell you what I was doing or where I was at at the time. It’s a weird sensation.
 
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This happens to me commonly, although like stated previously, it is mixed. Sometimes I feel and sometimes I don't.
 
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There maybe further replies to this thread but at least I know I am not alone. There are other things that I notice but am always afraid to say anything to anyone because sometimes I think it's just my imagination. The only other thing that seems to happen, I can be at home need to go somewhere and put a diaper on and I will feel a little bit of wetness very little but a little none the less.
 
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Generally I am aware of how wet I am, sometimes the little leaks add up more than I realize.
 
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enthusi said:
Yep, and it’s happening more frequently as my urge incontinence worsens. I’m wetting progressively smaller amounts more frequently. Similar to others here, I have mixed incontinence and my symptoms are all over the place. Usually I can tell when I’m peeing, but sometimes I don’t pay attentions and I’m surprised to see that I’m wet.

It mostly happens when I’m standing and working on a project and in the zone. I may or may not have a fuzzy recollection that I wet at some point in the not too distant past, but I couldn’t tell you what I was doing or where I was at at the time. It’s a weird sensation.
That's how it started with me, very similar!.
 
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Mine can be really huge at time and sometimes not at all. I do manage to go to toilet too sometimes but most of time need heavy diapers
 
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enthusi said:
I’m wetting progressively smaller amounts more frequently.
I'm grateful for being able to take Ditropan XL (oxybutynin tablets) because it reduces frequent urination. Even though I am diapered up 24/7, I have decreased the number of diaper changes by sometimes using the potty.
 
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I’m starting to notice my end is wet some times even though I haven’t wet in over an hour
Also my wetting voulums fairy greatly
 
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I'm often wet without remembering doing it or consciously realizing it's happening... After so many years of exclusively using the diaper, it's simply something that happens as there are far more interesting things going on that your attention is more focused on. Kinda like breathing, you don't remember doing it but you most certainly were! I still hold and void and don't constantly drip or squirt with movement, just do so more frequently and smaller amounts.

For the toilet trained folks, most of them don't remember each bathroom visit, it's simply something that happens multiple times a day and is not "eventful" or special to remember.

Also, good on you for using a good diaper (or other product?) that you don't notice is doing it's job! There's plenty of poor quality products available that are not reliable and uncomfortable - the poor quality products make incontinence more of a hassle than it needs to be!
 
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I sometimes wet the bed without even knowing I peed until it’s too late
 
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parcelboy2 said:
I’m starting to notice my end is wet some times even though I haven’t wet in over an hour. Also my wetting volumes vary fairly greatly.
With not seeing any mention of what is happening in bed, I'm going to present information on bed-wetting anyway:

A lot of folks think bed-wetting is something that only happens to kids, but it's a problem that can hit grown-ups, too. You may feel embarrassed to wake up to wet sheets, but it's not your fault. It could be due to a medical condition, medicine, or a problem with your bladder. You've got lots of ways to fix it.

A. Causes

If you start wetting the bed as an adult, see your doctor. You may hear them call your problem nocturnal enuresis, which is the medical name of the condition. Some of the reasons it may be happening to you:

1. Your kidneys make more pee than normal. A hormone called ADH tells your kidneys to make less urine, and you normally make less of this hormone at night. When you have bed-wetting issues, you may not make enough of this hormone or your kidneys might not respond well to it. A form of diabetes called diabetes insipid-us also affects ADH levels, causing you to make more urine.


2. Your bladder can't hold enough urine. When there isn't enough room in your bladder, pee can leak.

3. OAB (overactive bladder). Your bladder muscles normally squeeze when you're ready to pee. In OAB, these muscles squeeze too often or at the wrong times.

4. Medicine. Some drugs you take can irritate your bladder, such as sleeping pills or anti-psychotics like:

5. Bed-wetting may also be due to conditions that affect your body's ability to store and hold urine. For instance, bladder cancer and prostate cancer can cause it. So can diseases of the brain and spine, such as a seizure disorder, multiple sclerosis, or Parkinson's disease.

6. Some other possible causes are:

Blocked urethra (tube that carries urine from the bladder)

B. How Is Bed-Wetting Diagnosed?

Your doctor will do an exam and ask about your symptoms and health history. Keep a diary so you'll have the answers to their questions. Write down things like:
  • How often and what time your bed-wetting happens
  • How much urine comes out (a lot or a little)
  • What and how much you drank before bed
  • Any other symptoms you've had
Your doctor will do tests to diagnose the problem, such as:
  • Urinalysis. It checks a sample of your urine to look for an infection or other conditions of the urinary tract -- the collection of organs that are involved with urine like the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra.
  • Urine culture. Your doctor sends a small sample of your urine to a lab, where technicians put it in a special dish with nutrients. This test looks for bacteria or yeast in your urine. It can diagnose a urinary tract infection.
  • Uroflowmetry. You pee into a special funnel to measure how much urine you make and how quickly it flows out.
  • Post-void residual urine measurement. This test measures how much urine is left in your bladder after you pee.

C. How Do You Treat Bed-Wetting?

Your doctor may suggest you start by making a few changes to your daily and nightly routines:
  • Try bladder retraining. Go to the bathroom at set times during the day and night. Slowly increase the amount of time between bathroom visits -- for example, by 15 minutes at a time. This will train your bladder to hold more fluid.
  • Don't drink right before bed. That way, you won't make as much urine. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can stimulate your bladder.
  • Use an alarm clock. Set it to wake you up at regular times during the night so you can use the bathroom.
  • Try a bed-wetting alarm system. You attach it to your underwear or a pad on your bed. It will alert you as soon as you start to wet the bed.
  • Take medicines. Several can help with bed-wetting. DDAVP (Desmopressin) reduces the amount of urine your kidneys make.
Other drugs calm overactive bladder muscles, such as:
  • Darifenacin (Enablex)
  • Fesoterodine fumarate (Toviaz)
  • Gemtesa
  • Imipramine (Tofranil)
  • Myrbetriq
  • Oxybutynin (Ditropan)
  • Solifenacin (VESIcare)
  • Tolterodine (Detrol)
  • Trospium chloride
  • Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) can be injected into the bladder to relax the muscles so that you have more time to get to a bathroom when you feel the need to pee. If medicines and other treatments don't work, your doctor might recommend one of these procedures:
  • Sacral nerve stimulation. It helps control an overactive bladder. Your doctor puts a small device into your body that sends signals to nerves in your lower back that help control the flow of urine.
  • Detrusor myectomy. It's a major operation that treats an overactive bladder. Your surgeon removes part or all of the muscles around your bladder to stop them from contracting at the wrong times.

D. Tips to Deal With Wetness

Until you can get bed-wetting under control, take some simple steps to manage the situation:
  • Put a waterproof cover or pad over your mattress or sheets to keep them dry.
  • Wear absorbent underwear or pads to bed.
  • Use special skin cleansing cloths and lotions to prevent your skin from getting irritated.
If you try one treatment and it doesn't work, go back to your doctor. Sometimes it takes a few tries to find the right solution to bed-wetting.

See webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/bed-wetting-in-adults
 
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When i am doing things and can’t get to a toilet, and fill my diaper with a lot of pee, the extra weight is difficult to handle and still be active. Usually need to be changed ASAP!
 
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SeniorMan said:
With not seeing any mention of what is happening in bed, I'm going to present information on bed-wetting anyway:

A lot of folks think bed-wetting is something that only happens to kids, but it's a problem that can hit grown-ups, too. You may feel embarrassed to wake up to wet sheets, but it's not your fault. It could be due to a medical condition, medicine, or a problem with your bladder. You've got lots of ways to fix it.

A. Causes

If you start wetting the bed as an adult, see your doctor. You may hear them call your problem nocturnal enuresis, which is the medical name of the condition. Some of the reasons it may be happening to you:

1. Your kidneys make more pee than normal. A hormone called ADH tells your kidneys to make less urine, and you normally make less of this hormone at night. When you have bed-wetting issues, you may not make enough of this hormone or your kidneys might not respond well to it. A form of diabetes called diabetes insipid-us also affects ADH levels, causing you to make more urine.


2. Your bladder can't hold enough urine. When there isn't enough room in your bladder, pee can leak.

3. OAB (overactive bladder). Your bladder muscles normally squeeze when you're ready to pee. In OAB, these muscles squeeze too often or at the wrong times.

4. Medicine. Some drugs you take can irritate your bladder, such as sleeping pills or anti-psychotics like:

5. Bed-wetting may also be due to conditions that affect your body's ability to store and hold urine. For instance, bladder cancer and prostate cancer can cause it. So can diseases of the brain and spine, such as a seizure disorder, multiple sclerosis, or Parkinson's disease.

6. Some other possible causes are:

Blocked urethra (tube that carries urine from the bladder)

B. How Is Bed-Wetting Diagnosed?

Your doctor will do an exam and ask about your symptoms and health history. Keep a diary so you'll have the answers to their questions. Write down things like:
  • How often and what time your bed-wetting happens
  • How much urine comes out (a lot or a little)
  • What and how much you drank before bed
  • Any other symptoms you've had
Your doctor will do tests to diagnose the problem, such as:
  • Urinalysis. It checks a sample of your urine to look for an infection or other conditions of the urinary tract -- the collection of organs that are involved with urine like the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra.
  • Urine culture. Your doctor sends a small sample of your urine to a lab, where technicians put it in a special dish with nutrients. This test looks for bacteria or yeast in your urine. It can diagnose a urinary tract infection.
  • Uroflowmetry. You pee into a special funnel to measure how much urine you make and how quickly it flows out.
  • Post-void residual urine measurement. This test measures how much urine is left in your bladder after you pee.

C. How Do You Treat Bed-Wetting?

Your doctor may suggest you start by making a few changes to your daily and nightly routines:
  • Try bladder retraining. Go to the bathroom at set times during the day and night. Slowly increase the amount of time between bathroom visits -- for example, by 15 minutes at a time. This will train your bladder to hold more fluid.
  • Don't drink right before bed. That way, you won't make as much urine. Avoid caffeine and alcohol, which can stimulate your bladder.
  • Use an alarm clock. Set it to wake you up at regular times during the night so you can use the bathroom.
  • Try a bed-wetting alarm system. You attach it to your underwear or a pad on your bed. It will alert you as soon as you start to wet the bed.
  • Take medicines. Several can help with bed-wetting. DDAVP (Desmopressin) reduces the amount of urine your kidneys make.
Other drugs calm overactive bladder muscles, such as:
  • Darifenacin (Enablex)
  • Fesoterodine fumarate (Toviaz)
  • Gemtesa
  • Imipramine (Tofranil)
  • Myrbetriq
  • Oxybutynin (Ditropan)
  • Solifenacin (VESIcare)
  • Tolterodine (Detrol)
  • Trospium chloride
  • Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) can be injected into the bladder to relax the muscles so that you have more time to get to a bathroom when you feel the need to pee. If medicines and other treatments don't work, your doctor might recommend one of these procedures:
  • Sacral nerve stimulation. It helps control an overactive bladder. Your doctor puts a small device into your body that sends signals to nerves in your lower back that help control the flow of urine.
  • Detrusor myectomy. It's a major operation that treats an overactive bladder. Your surgeon removes part or all of the muscles around your bladder to stop them from contracting at the wrong times.

D. Tips to Deal With Wetness

Until you can get bed-wetting under control, take some simple steps to manage the situation:
  • Put a waterproof cover or pad over your mattress or sheets to keep them dry.
  • Wear absorbent underwear or pads to bed.
  • Use special skin cleansing cloths and lotions to prevent your skin from getting irritated.
If you try one treatment and it doesn't work, go back to your doctor. Sometimes it takes a few tries to find the right solution to bed-wetting.

See webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/bed-wetting-in-adults
It’s neurogenic bladder, my urologist already told me, and I’ve tried medication and self catheterization and they didn’t work, my stepfather doesn’t believe CP causes bed wetting, my half sister deals with this too, even though she’s only 13, She has CP like I do, she wears Depend Night Defense diapers for her bed wetting, my biological father understands,and my urologist also made me hold it for two hours and I wet my pants like a baby without protection, I was extremely embarrassed and I cannot predict when I’ll have an accident, I have autism as well
 
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I’m wet again! This is completely embarrassing, I can smell the urine
 
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Jorelaxed said:
I does happen, My incon is rathed mixed, at times I can feel the wetness coming out, other times, don't feel a thing but my diaper is clearly wet.
Been like that for me many years now.
Same here.
 
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It happens as your body adapts to being diapered and you get use to using your diaper.
 
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