Wellness Superio Review

KatelynG

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The Wellness Superio is the allegedly premium version of Wellness-brand diapers. They are the fabled "astronaut diapers" - marketed as using the same material as NASA's MAGs.

This is a review of the medium size, purchased October 2014. These are designed to fit people with waist size 24-36 inches and are rated to hold approximately 739mL. The other available sizes are Large (36-46", 798mL) and X-Large (46-67", 858mL).



Appearance, Size, and Features



The Wellness Superio is plain white with a blue wetness indicator running up and down the diaper. It is plastic-backed with a thicker plastic layer at the landing area for the tapes.

261-1-FrontFolded.png


261-2-BackFolded.png


Front and Back of Folded Diaper


Three of the diapers were stacked, pressed down with a heavy object (a PS3), and measured to give an average height. The stack was measured at approximately 6.3 cm, giving an average thickness of about 2.1 cm.

261-3-stacked.png


3 Diapers Stacked


The Wellness Superio has two adhesive tapes on each side which stick to the plastic surface of the diaper. These are not refastenable and do not have a two-part tape system, although they can be removed and replaced if done carefully. The adhesive on the tapes is very strong and unlikely to accidentally come off.

261-4-tapes.png


The Tapes


I laid out the diaper and measured its dimensions. These are organized below for simplicity:

Length: 75 cm
Width at center: 19.0 cm between the elastics, 30.3 cm from edge-to-edge
Width at wings (both sides): 66 cm

261-5-outside.png


261-6-inside.png


Front and Back of Unfolded Diaper



Performance and Fit


In order to measure the capacity of the diaper, I wore it and poured water down the front 100 mL at a time followed by 30 seconds of sitting accompanying each pour, recording any observations I made and repeating. I concluded the test when the diaper leaked.

Throughout the test, the wetness indicator smeared, but did not disappear or change color. At 800mL, there was a very slight leak from the back cuffs. I could not determine if this was due to improper water pouring or an actual leak, so I kept going. I poured extremely slowly for the remainder of the test. A very significant leak occurred at 1000mL and I concluded the test.

At capacity, the Wellness Superio was fairly thick but not difficult to move in. Its squishiness rivaled that of baby diapers - this diaper is largely SAP.

I find it reasonable to believe that the effective capacity of these diapers is similar to the advertised capacity of 739mL due to the slight leak at 800mL. Although I was able to get the diaper to hold more water, it absorbed the water slowly enough that it would be impractical to expect that capacity in daily use.

When refolded and measured, the diaper had swollen to 6.8cm, around 3.24 times the dry size - a fairly large swollen size for an adult diaper.

261-7-wetdry.png


Dry Diaper Next to Full Diaper After Quantitative Test


My waist size is around 28 inches - in the low-middle end of the Wellness Superio's advertised size range. It fit a lot like a baby diaper fits a baby - it rose to my belly button and covered more of my body than most adult diapers. The plastic was soft but very thin.

To test the diaper out in a real-life scenario, I wore it for a day starting at around 6 PM and ending at around 9 AM the next day. As I always do and advise others to do, I wet the diaper often and in small quantities. The diaper was fairly close to capacity when it was taken off, although it probably could have lasted a tiny bit longer. These felt extremely soft and only felt softer as they became more wet, and were probably the softest-feeling diapers I've used.

The diaper was distinctly not discreet, but it was very thin when dry as well as easy to move around in. The most notably non-discreet part of the diaper was the tapes. I once had to remove the diaper to use the restroom rather than mess and the tapes were audible throughout the house according to my (possibly over-sensitive) roommate. In addition, the removal of the tapes actually ripped part of the plastic covering of the diaper, exposing the fluff and SAP underneath. I was forced to apply packing tape to prevent further issues with ripping.



Price and Final Thoughts


I obtained these diapers for review purposes from NorthShore Care Supply, where they are available in a pack of 18 for $29.50 ($1.64/diaper) or a case of 54 for $79.97 ($1.48/diaper). These should be available at most diaper resellers as they are a fairly mainstream product.

These are honestly probably the closest thing to plastic-backed baby diapers available in adult sizes. I would definitely not recommend using these as a daytime, out-and-about diaper. I'd also be wary of the thin and fragile plastic backing - maybe put a bit of packing tape around the landing zone just in case. They don't hold a ridiculous amount, but they're cheap enough to not need to. These would probably be a decent AB diaper if they didn't look so generic. - I'd suggest making your own tapes/adding patterned duct tape if you're using these because they fit/squish like baby diapers.
 
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GrumpyMonk

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I'd also be wary of the thin and fragile plastic backing

This. I ordered a sample of both this and the original Wellness brief from the manufacturer's website and found that, while capacity, fit, and feel were all pretty good, BOTH diapers' plastic backing ripped open near the seat area. I wasn't moving in any kind of unusual way and they weren't taped on excessively tightly or anything. I did notice a lot of SAP crystals sort of melted in with the plastic backing creating weirdly sharp surface texture, so this may have been a contributing factor to the product failure. I already thought that they were too expensive for what you get, but if the plastic backing is unreliable, none of the other features really matter in my view.
 

pepsijoe

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I tried this diaper and it is not to good for some one who works a lot and bending down a lot I have had them spilt open in the back and leak as well fall a part
 
D

Deleted member 47370

Guest
The Wellness Superio is the allegedly premium version of Wellness-brand diapers. They are the fabled "astronaut diapers" - marketed as using the same material as NASA's MAGs.

This is a review of the medium size, purchased October 2014. These are designed to fit people with waist size 24-36 inches and are rated to hold approximately 739mL. The other available sizes are Large (36-46", 798mL) and X-Large (46-67", 858mL).



Appearance, Size, and Features


The Wellness Superio is plain white with a blue wetness indicator running up and down the diaper. It is plastic-backed with a thicker plastic layer at the landing area for the tapes.

261-1-FrontFolded.png


261-2-BackFolded.png


Front and Back of Folded Diaper


Three of the diapers were stacked, pressed down with a heavy object (a PS3), and measured to give an average height. The stack was measured at approximately 6.3 cm, giving an average thickness of about 2.1 cm.

261-3-stacked.png


3 Diapers Stacked


The Wellness Superio has two adhesive tapes on each side which stick to the plastic surface of the diaper. These are not refastenable and do not have a two-part tape system, although they can be removed and replaced if done carefully. The adhesive on the tapes is very strong and unlikely to accidentally come off.

261-4-tapes.png


The Tapes


I laid out the diaper and measured its dimensions. These are organized below for simplicity:

Length: 75 cm
Width at center: 19.0 cm between the elastics, 30.3 cm from edge-to-edge
Width at wings (both sides): 66 cm

261-5-outside.png


261-6-inside.png


Front and Back of Unfolded Diaper



Performance and Fit


In order to measure the capacity of the diaper, I wore it and poured water down the front 100 mL at a time followed by 30 seconds of sitting accompanying each pour, recording any observations I made and repeating. I concluded the test when the diaper leaked.

Throughout the test, the wetness indicator smeared, but did not disappear or change color. At 800mL, there was a very slight leak from the back cuffs. I could not determine if this was due to improper water pouring or an actual leak, so I kept going. I poured extremely slowly for the remainder of the test. A very significant leak occurred at 1000mL and I concluded the test.

At capacity, the Wellness Superio was fairly thick but not difficult to move in. Its squishiness rivaled that of baby diapers - this diaper is largely SAP.

I find it reasonable to believe that the effective capacity of these diapers is similar to the advertised capacity of 739mL due to the slight leak at 800mL. Although I was able to get the diaper to hold more water, it absorbed the water slowly enough that it would be impractical to expect that capacity in daily use.

When refolded and measured, the diaper had swollen to 6.8cm, around 3.24 times the dry size - a fairly large swollen size for an adult diaper.

261-7-wetdry.png


Dry Diaper Next to Full Diaper After Quantitative Test


My waist size is around 28 inches - in the low-middle end of the Wellness Superio's advertised size range. It fit a lot like a baby diaper fits a baby - it rose to my belly button and covered more of my body than most adult diapers. The plastic was soft but very thin.

To test the diaper out in a real-life scenario, I wore it for a day starting at around 6 PM and ending at around 9 AM the next day. As I always do and advise others to do, I wet the diaper often and in small quantities. The diaper was fairly close to capacity when it was taken off, although it probably could have lasted a tiny bit longer. These felt extremely soft and only felt softer as they became more wet, and were probably the softest-feeling diapers I've used.

The diaper was distinctly not discreet, but it was very thin when dry as well as easy to move around in. The most notably non-discreet part of the diaper was the tapes. I once had to remove the diaper to use the restroom rather than mess and the tapes were audible throughout the house according to my (possibly over-sensitive) roommate. In addition, the removal of the tapes actually ripped part of the plastic covering of the diaper, exposing the fluff and SAP underneath. I was forced to apply packing tape to prevent further issues with ripping.



Price and Final Thoughts


I obtained these diapers for review purposes from NorthShore Care Supply, where they are available in a pack of 18 for $29.50 ($1.64/diaper) or a case of 54 for $79.97 ($1.48/diaper). These should be available at most diaper resellers as they are a fairly mainstream product.

These are honestly probably the closest thing to plastic-backed baby diapers available in adult sizes. I would definitely not recommend using these as a daytime, out-and-about diaper. I'd also be wary of the thin and fragile plastic backing - maybe put a bit of packing tape around the landing zone just in case. They don't hold a ridiculous amount, but they're cheap enough to not need to. These would probably be a decent AB diaper if they didn't look so generic. - I'd suggest making your own tapes/adding patterned duct tape if you're using these because they fit/squish like baby diapers.
 

Diaperman95

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I ordered case of the original ones that are plastic back. every diaper in the case split down the middle of the but. I called wellness they said they was not made for active people they was made for bed ridden people. I said You mean astronauts cant space walk in them. They kina made me mad because I purchased a case and they refused to give back my money and no place I read on the package or their site said for bed ridden non ambulatory patients only. I was not impressed.
 

Frungie

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I have never had the problem of Wellness Original diapers splitting in the back while I am active and wet. I wear them with confidence to work all the time without an embarrassing incident. I like the soft blue plastic. I think I just talked myself into wearing one for work today after I change my current wet and messy InControl Essential diaper. For a little more security and absorbency I am going to use a diaper booster.
 

Needdiscipline

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  2. Diaper Lover
  3. Little
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The Wellness Superio is the allegedly premium version of Wellness-brand diapers. They are the fabled "astronaut diapers" - marketed as using the same material as NASA's MAGs.

This is a review of the medium size, purchased October 2014. These are designed to fit people with waist size 24-36 inches and are rated to hold approximately 739mL. The other available sizes are Large (36-46", 798mL) and X-Large (46-67", 858mL).



Appearance, Size, and Features


The Wellness Superio is plain white with a blue wetness indicator running up and down the diaper. It is plastic-backed with a thicker plastic layer at the landing area for the tapes.

261-1-FrontFolded.png


261-2-BackFolded.png


Front and Back of Folded Diaper


Three of the diapers were stacked, pressed down with a heavy object (a PS3), and measured to give an average height. The stack was measured at approximately 6.3 cm, giving an average thickness of about 2.1 cm.

261-3-stacked.png


3 Diapers Stacked


The Wellness Superio has two adhesive tapes on each side which stick to the plastic surface of the diaper. These are not refastenable and do not have a two-part tape system, although they can be removed and replaced if done carefully. The adhesive on the tapes is very strong and unlikely to accidentally come off.

261-4-tapes.png


The Tapes


I laid out the diaper and measured its dimensions. These are organized below for simplicity:

Length: 75 cm
Width at center: 19.0 cm between the elastics, 30.3 cm from edge-to-edge
Width at wings (both sides): 66 cm

261-5-outside.png


261-6-inside.png


Front and Back of Unfolded Diaper



Performance and Fit


In order to measure the capacity of the diaper, I wore it and poured water down the front 100 mL at a time followed by 30 seconds of sitting accompanying each pour, recording any observations I made and repeating. I concluded the test when the diaper leaked.

Throughout the test, the wetness indicator smeared, but did not disappear or change color. At 800mL, there was a very slight leak from the back cuffs. I could not determine if this was due to improper water pouring or an actual leak, so I kept going. I poured extremely slowly for the remainder of the test. A very significant leak occurred at 1000mL and I concluded the test.

At capacity, the Wellness Superio was fairly thick but not difficult to move in. Its squishiness rivaled that of baby diapers - this diaper is largely SAP.

I find it reasonable to believe that the effective capacity of these diapers is similar to the advertised capacity of 739mL due to the slight leak at 800mL. Although I was able to get the diaper to hold more water, it absorbed the water slowly enough that it would be impractical to expect that capacity in daily use.

When refolded and measured, the diaper had swollen to 6.8cm, around 3.24 times the dry size - a fairly large swollen size for an adult diaper.

261-7-wetdry.png


Dry Diaper Next to Full Diaper After Quantitative Test


My waist size is around 28 inches - in the low-middle end of the Wellness Superio's advertised size range. It fit a lot like a baby diaper fits a baby - it rose to my belly button and covered more of my body than most adult diapers. The plastic was soft but very thin.

To test the diaper out in a real-life scenario, I wore it for a day starting at around 6 PM and ending at around 9 AM the next day. As I always do and advise others to do, I wet the diaper often and in small quantities. The diaper was fairly close to capacity when it was taken off, although it probably could have lasted a tiny bit longer. These felt extremely soft and only felt softer as they became more wet, and were probably the softest-feeling diapers I've used.

The diaper was distinctly not discreet, but it was very thin when dry as well as easy to move around in. The most notably non-discreet part of the diaper was the tapes. I once had to remove the diaper to use the restroom rather than mess and the tapes were audible throughout the house according to my (possibly over-sensitive) roommate. In addition, the removal of the tapes actually ripped part of the plastic covering of the diaper, exposing the fluff and SAP underneath. I was forced to apply packing tape to prevent further issues with ripping.



Price and Final Thoughts


I obtained these diapers for review purposes from NorthShore Care Supply, where they are available in a pack of 18 for $29.50 ($1.64/diaper) or a case of 54 for $79.97 ($1.48/diaper). These should be available at most diaper resellers as they are a fairly mainstream product.

These are honestly probably the closest thing to plastic-backed baby diapers available in adult sizes. I would definitely not recommend using these as a daytime, out-and-about diaper. I'd also be wary of the thin and fragile plastic backing - maybe put a bit of packing tape around the landing zone just in case. They don't hold a ridiculous amount, but they're cheap enough to not need to. These would probably be a decent AB diaper if they didn't look so generic. - I'd suggest making your own tapes/adding patterned duct tape if you're using these because they fit/squish like baby diapers.
This is nice to see side by side with the air supreme it really helps provide a grasp on what’s going on.
 
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