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Typing...

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andrew90

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Why is it better to type like this?

than like this. i mean its just a convention right?
 

FluffyFluffers

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Why is it better to type like this?This one conveys more intelligence to the conversation. Thus not making the person (For lack of a better word) sound Stupid.



than like this. i mean its just a convention right?This Sentence makes you sound like an uneducated third grader.
 

LilRabbit

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Because we all learned how to manage our grammar in like first-grade or something? Granted, using all lower case isn't that bad... at all, really. It's the internet slang that's REALLY obnoxious and that you should avoid like the plague.
 

FluffyFluffers

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Because we all learned how to manage our grammar in like first-grade or something? Granted, using all lower case isn't that bad... at all, really. It's the internet slang that's REALLY obnoxious and that you should avoid like the plague.
Really, I did not know a lot of proper grammar(Shit! I still rarely use it.) till about 6-8 months ago. :p
 
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Because we all learned how to manage our grammar in like first-grade or something? Granted, using all lower case isn't that bad... at all, really. It's the internet slang that's REALLY obnoxious and that you should avoid like the plague.
rofl u realy fukn mad!!

Seriously though, I type properly because I figure I have to use it when I get started in my career. "if im used 2 typing like dis" then I'll have to change my habits, which is something I've never been a fan of doing.
 

Chris H

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Plus, it's like beating your brain against the monitor when you have to read horrible grammar/spelling. You can't expect people to have perfect grammar, but they should at least try more than "lol i leik dis thred." This is a forum, not a Yahoo Chatroom. :p
 

Jussen

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It's definitely more appealing to type using the rules designed for English as a language :D

In Spanish, if you remove a simple accent mark from the word nadó, you create just nado, which means "I swim" rather than the intended "he swam." You can see how this causes confusion and annoys academic-level Spaniards. ^^;
 

Dawes

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I type in proper English because it's easier and more natural for me to do so, because I've been doing it so long. Trying to pull away from that habit would be immensely difficult.
 

Charlie

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I think I'm a bit OCD with it. :p

It really annoys me when something isn't quite right...

The most annoying thing is people NOT CLOSING BRACKETS (like this.

Because then I'm spending the rest of the post expecting the bracket to close, even if deep down I know they've missed it I'm stubborn: 'No, this is still in the bracket!'.

This is why I hate newspapers, because they do this:

Somebody said: "Blah blah blah
"Blah blah
"blah blah blah"

Who came up with that convention? Somebody who wanted me to suffer probably!

So annoying.).

Anyway using capitals just seems better, and it requires no extract effort on my part since my finger seems to hit the shift button without me knowing it so...
 

Hex

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[font="Calibri,Arial"]Since my wpm is normally 40 and if I'm sure of what I'm typing (rather than the usual thinking as I type) it can be as high as 70wpm (wpm = words per minute), the time taken to capitalise those words is negligible. The only exception is on my iPod and even then it has predictive text for things like im to I'm and
end of sentence.nww sentence
(deliberate typo)
to
end of sentence. New sentence.
As for why I prefer other people to do it aswell, it's because I at least find it easier to read.
[/font]
 

Squigma

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I like to think of it as decoration. Yes, people will be able to say if you avoid basic punctuation. Just like... you can live in a house with unpainted walls. Yeah, it takes more effort to paint the walls. And yeah, it takes more effort to punctuate what you're writing. So if you're fine living in a house with bare walls, then go for it. Just don't expect your guests to appreciate it.

Without the metaphor: well presented text looks nicer. You don't need puntuation or capitalization. But a lot of people will be much happier if you do. My pet hates are people not capitalizing "I", and multiple exclamation marks. Not using enough commas and full stops (and paragraphs, for longer stuff) bothers me too, it just feels like they're speaking really fast and I have no time to rest and take in what I've read. I think that's the best bit of punctuation - it breaks up the flow a bit, makes it calmer.

Some people overuse it though, and I'm not sure about that. Sometimes it annoys me to see a full stop where a comma would be much better, or nothing at all. But for some people it's fine, it's just they're style.

I think the only thing that makes up for the poor grammar in the second part of the post is the fact that your post number is a mersenne prime. :p
 

dogboy

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I often run the computer labs at my school, and if it's an English class, I look at what they are writing. You can always tell which students are spending too much time texting to one another by their writing style. I'll go around and help them with grammar and structure. They fall into lazy habits by texting, and then those habits follow them into everyday life.
 
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Why is it better to type like this?

than like this. i mean its just a convention right?
Yes and no.

I think you're going for capitalization and other "concrete structure" rules of English.

There are two reasons:
  1. It's convention, as you pointed out.
  2. It's easier on the eyes and gives visual cues to letters.

IT IS FOR THE SECOND REASON THAT TYPING IN ALL CAPS IS DIFFICULT TO READ; YOU NO LONGER HAVE AS MANY STRUCTURAL HINTS INTO THE LETTERS AND THEREFORE READING SLOWS DOWN WHEN READING IN ALL CAPS.

it is the same case for all-lowercase letters. for example, without a capital to denote the start of a new sentence, it is more difficult to pick out of a block of text. also, it makes it harder to figure out locations or people, such as washington or jefferson or even dr. freud. either way, it gives few low-level (bottom-up) hints about content/structure.

This, on the other hand, is a bit easier to read. You can fairly quickly tell where one sentence begins, given the capitalization. Furthermore, you can pretty quickly pick out people and places - even Washington and Jefferson, and the physician Dr. Ron Paul as well. There are more "hints" here for your eyes/brain to latch on to.

Finally, one interesting point: I learned to type on a typewriter. A real one. With clacky keys. Keys that you had to mash and would answer with "SNA-CLACK!" When you really got going, the keys would sometimes mash together (thanks, QWERTY layout ... but that's another story for another day) and you'd have to untangle them. I learned - on a monotype font - that there were two spaces after a period. Like this.* It was only in the past couple of years that I was clued in to the fact that these days, we abhor two spaces after a period, as it creates "ugly rivers of whitespace" down the page. You see, we now use proportional-width fonts. So ... if you need any information on the concrete structure of the language, specifically as used and expected by "professional" layout types, you'd be really well-served by the book, The PC is not a typewriter.

Okay, I've seen something else that I want to comment on:
I like to think of it as decoration. Yes, people will be able to say if you avoid basic punctuation. Just like... you can live in a house with unpainted walls. Yeah, it takes more effort to paint the walls. And yeah, it takes more effort to punctuate what you're writing. So if you're fine living in a house with bare walls, then go for it. Just don't expect your guests to appreciate it.
Yikes. Punctuation and grammar form the foundation of written communication (along with syntax, diction, and so on). By "guests not appreciating it", what you really mean is, "not gaining employment past lower-middle management."

Without the metaphor: well presented text looks nicer.
And it shows education. And attention to detail. And a general ability to work within a framework. There's more going on here than, "looking nice" versus "looking sloppy."

You don't need puntuation or capitalization.
Disagree.
But a lot of people will be much happier if you do. My pet hates are people not capitalizing "I", and multiple exclamation marks. Not using enough commas and full stops (and paragraphs, for longer stuff) bothers me too, it just feels like they're speaking really fast and I have no time to rest and take in what I've read. I think that's the best bit of punctuation - it breaks up the flow a bit, makes it calmer.
Correct. I've started to see sentences, however, that go a bit beyond what I like. Granted, I come from a tradition of reading long sentences that scan well (18th and 19th century), but it makes me crazy when I see the following:

This, is a sentence, it's great, with all its commas.

That kind of conceptual brevity makes me feel like I'm reading while bouncing around on a treadmill. It - bounce - is - bounce - really - bounce - good - bounce - for - bounce - turning - bounce - me - bounce - off - bounce - to - bounce - the - bounce - author. Also, what on earth is going on with apostrophes? Its li'ke peop'le use them when'ever the'y want, without regar'd for their correct u'se. Theyre crazy, tho'se people.

(Yes, leaving an apostrophe off "it's" and "they're" was intentional.)

*Well, the filter strips off two spaces after a period. Bah. Suffice it to say, it looks weird.
 
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starshine

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The *only* person who doesn't get on my nerves that doesn't type properly is avery. And that's because he does type properly, he just leaves out upper-case letters. Srssly, he's the only one.
 

Squigma

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The *only* person who doesn't get on my nerves that doesn't type properly is avery. And that's because he does type properly, he just leaves out upper-case letters. Srssly, he's the only one.
Agreed. If I know someone is not an idiot, I usually forgive them for poor typing. In fact, it kinda looks cute. I've been trying to stop capitalizing in chat, because I think it makes me look too serious :p
 

Hex

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I learned - on a monotype font - that there were two spaces after a period. Like this. It was only in the past couple of years that I was clued in to the fact that these days, we abhor two spaces after a period, as it creates "ugly rivers of whitespace" down the page. You see, we now use proportional-width fonts.
[font="Calibri,Arial"]Technology has moved on so far that web browsers automatically condense multiple spaces into one. There were actually fifteen spaces in between these two sentences (quote it to see, they show in the editor but nowhere else).[/font]
 
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[font="Calibri,Arial"]Technology has moved on so far that web browsers automatically condense multiple spaces into one. There were actually fifteen spaces in between these two sentences (quote it to see, they show in the editor but nowhere else).[/font]
True (as evidenced by this post and my earlier post) but I was talking about publication. As in academic journal publication. I asked a co-author why he stripped out all my double spaces, and that's how I found out! He likely saved us from some editor going a bit more nutty that day. :)
 

recovery

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I will simply say that I think everyone should be typing to the best of their ability, simply because it makes you easier to understand, makes the writer deliver their point better.

There are a few things that do annoy me though, and I just feel that certain people who do use "Text Speak" and blame it on their dyslexia or other related learning disability. I just think they should ideally stop reading text speak and try to read more.

I'm sorry, I was horendous to understand when I was younger with my writing. Being naive thinking that "only I had to understand my work, which often I couldn't read due to bad handwriting anyway". But I realised the importance and get my act together and worked on it.

I still don't feel confident in the way I express my points and I still can spot loads of mistakes given I look at them long enough. But not every error that doesn't "feel right" I will be able to fix. As if I keep rephrasing it too long I just have the bad phrase stuck in my head. But I feel that I have reached an acceptable level for most people to understand me. Just need to plan my writing more if It's going to be something large like 2 paragraphs. Which isn't always easy to judge as you can find yourself making more than you inteded.

Also Charlie, I too hate the missing " character too when newspapers quote people. It can get confusing. "Is this part of the quote or not?" It's not always obvious.
 

Jussen

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I think, in the grand scheme of things, as long as your message is conveyed, you have succeeded as a human being.

If you're writing like this poor fellow here: "faf kittttnes i hurd" then perhaps this is not the place for you o_O

Clear punctuation, grammar, spelling, &c. is appreciated, though ^^
 
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