Tips to cut down on wet nights, and leaks.

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jter42

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Hey I just wanted to ask,

Anybody know any tricks to cut down on the number of wet nights you have? I'm really trying to start becoming more proactive at ending my bed-wetting problem. It's come back as of a few months ago due to stress, and it's driving me mad. I'm up to about 4/7 wet nights a week which is rather disappointing.

I know there's things like cutting down on liquids, alarms, etc and would like to know if anyone has had any success in using those methods. The alarm doesn't sound like to much fun, but if it works I may try it. There's always the option of going back to the doctor and going for the medicine, but I despise taking medicines. I just feel like I may be able to solve this one through other means.

Also would anyone know a good site for a mattress protector that's durable? I already have a washable pad but it doesn't cover the whole bed so I still worry.

Thanks for the help,

Jter42
 

EPO1

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jter42

first let me say, that I'm sorry that you go through this (being a bedwetter)... I've been one for almost my entire life (I'm 33) and also have IC issues (daytime).

If you're certain it's "just" the stress, and you have had a medical check up (urologist) to rule out other possibilities than I'd suggest find a way to reduce the stress-level.
If it's "psychological" stress, go for some therapy. ... if it's an "outside" issue (work, etc.) try to find a solution.

Alarms. UGH... My parents tried those on my when I was about 10 or 11.... (can't really remember when exactly)... but they were HORRIBLE for myself...
I woke up, yes I did... but in 99% of the cases I was WET already or in the midst of it and couldn't stop it.... after a few weeks I was pretty much worn out, by being woken twice or thrice a night for most of the nights, having a hard time going back to sleep, as I had to change the PJ, get up and try to do the rest in the toilet, etc... my grades dropped, I was sleepy all the time and worst of all, it didn't stop the bedwetting.
Now the thing's this, they're supposed to have a rather high success rate (the alarms), not for me though. But it might be worth a try.

Cutting down Liquids is STUPID. I mean, OK, don't drink half a liter before you go to sleep, that'd be stupid on it's own... but you need to keep hydrated... cutting down drinks isn't a good thing for your health.
But about WHAT you drink: stay away from coke, sprite, etc... also most teas and coffee (if you're a coffee-drinker already). most of these kind of drinks are considered to have a diuertic effect (Read: you need to pee more)... stick with water, some teas (NOT green / black teas mostly), some juices, etc.

Other than that, as mentioned, if you haven't done so already, get an appointment with a urologist... skip the family doc - they know usually not a good deal about Incontinence.
 

downtide

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Cutting down Liquids is STUPID. I mean, OK, don't drink half a liter before you go to sleep, that'd be stupid on it's own... but you need to keep hydrated... cutting down drinks isn't a good thing for your health.
But about WHAT you drink: stay away from coke, sprite, etc... also most teas and coffee (if you're a coffee-drinker already). most of these kind of drinks are considered to have a diuertic effect (Read: you need to pee more)... stick with water, some teas (NOT green / black teas mostly), some juices, etc.

Basically, avoid anything with caffeine in it. Or alcohol.
 

itsacurlyone

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I was talking with an Osteopath a day or two ago about this very subject, because I had heard that both Chiropractors and Osteopaths can often assist. A friend of mine who is around 18yrs and has bedwetting problems prompted me to make the enquiry, and the Osteopath said.. oh yes.. he should go. They suggested a Cranial Osteopathy which gentley manipulated the head/skull. If not, they will try skeletal manipulation. - but it is an option worth considering if you have not considered this in the past. I hope you soon are able to sleep a full night without accidents.
 

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It is not advised at all to limit your daily liquid, your kidneys do need water to make their job which is to eliminate protein's wastes, toxins, etc . The more you drink and pee during the day, the less your kidneys will produce pee during the night. So you should drink at least 1.5 litre of water during the morning and afternoon.
On the contrary, if you don't drink enough during the day, you may be thirsty at diner and evening, and your kidneys will keep producing pee during the night instead of reduce the among. I agree with the previous post it s not a good idea to limit fluid (except caffeine) when you are thirsty.
So try to dont be thirsty in the evening by drinking plenty water earlier.
After several days, you will pee less at night so it may help you to reduce your bedwetting.

Take care.
 

jter42

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jter42

first let me say, that I'm sorry that you go through this (being a bedwetter)... I've been one for almost my entire life (I'm 33) and also have IC issues (daytime).

If you're certain it's "just" the stress, and you have had a medical check up (urologist) to rule out other possibilities than I'd suggest find a way to reduce the stress-level.
If it's "psychological" stress, go for some therapy. ... if it's an "outside" issue (work, etc.) try to find a solution.

Alarms. UGH... My parents tried those on my when I was about 10 or 11.... (can't really remember when exactly)... but they were HORRIBLE for myself...
I woke up, yes I did... but in 99% of the cases I was WET already or in the midst of it and couldn't stop it.... after a few weeks I was pretty much worn out, by being woken twice or thrice a night for most of the nights, having a hard time going back to sleep, as I had to change the PJ, get up and try to do the rest in the toilet, etc... my grades dropped, I was sleepy all the time and worst of all, it didn't stop the bedwetting.
Now the thing's this, they're supposed to have a rather high success rate (the alarms), not for me though. But it might be worth a try.

Cutting down Liquids is STUPID. I mean, OK, don't drink half a liter before you go to sleep, that'd be stupid on it's own... but you need to keep hydrated... cutting down drinks isn't a good thing for your health.
But about WHAT you drink: stay away from coke, sprite, etc... also most teas and coffee (if you're a coffee-drinker already). most of these kind of drinks are considered to have a diuertic effect (Read: you need to pee more)... stick with water, some teas (NOT green / black teas mostly), some juices, etc.

Other than that, as mentioned, if you haven't done so already, get an appointment with a urologist... skip the family doc - they know usually not a good deal about Incontinence.

I've seen the doctor a couple time's, and he chalks it up to stress every time. He say's there's nothing wrong with my bladder, or anything else, and that this should go away with time. I'm mainly just stressed about living on my own, paying bills, work, school, etc. I have bad anxiety too so that's definitely not helping.

I've really been considering seeing a therapist recently, it may do some good. I'm a little discouraged about the alarm definitely thought that may be a good option. I'm also going to start watching what kind's of fluids I drink to, that's one thing I haven't payed attention to.

Thanks so much for all the advice!

- - - Updated - - -

I was talking with an Osteopath a day or two ago about this very subject, because I had heard that both Chiropractors and Osteopaths can often assist. A friend of mine who is around 18yrs and has bedwetting problems prompted me to make the enquiry, and the Osteopath said.. oh yes.. he should go. They suggested a Cranial Osteopathy which gentley manipulated the head/skull. If not, they will try skeletal manipulation. - but it is an option worth considering if you have not considered this in the past. I hope you soon are able to sleep a full night without accidents.

Thanks for the suggestion! I just did some research on this, and it seems very interesting. I may have to look into this if nothing I try starts working within a few weeks. I didn't know that there were methods such as this one to help reduce stress. Going to be doing a good bit of research on this today.

And thanks, I hope I will too!
 

EPO1

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Back when I was a teen & bedwetting (well that has persisted unfortunately to this very day), my parents tried EVERYTHING... I mean everything.
From about a dozen different medical doctors (general, urologists, neurologists), to therapists, osteopath (didn't do zing), cranio sacral (which I personally don't believe in at ALL - didn't do dip either), to medications (some worked partially but the side effects were "killing" me), to hypnotherapy (nice experience, meditative state, relaxation, but didn't help at all either), to techno-gadgets (alarm pants, yuck)... to keeping me in cloth diapers (read: feel the wetness when it happens) (I HATE CLOTH DIAPERS), to different diets, etc... at one point I remember being so fed up with all that - I felt like a damn Guinea pig - I basically begged my parents to stop trying so damn hard to cure me and just let it be as it is (diapers)... at that point I wasn't a DL by definition... and I would still love to be rid of the bedwetting and daytime issues I have.

Short: I've tried it all... and nothing worked - but that's just me...
these days I'm not much of a believer in most of the "alternative esoteric medicine" anyhow.


if it's stress: then find a way to cut that down.
I don't know what kind of stress you have to deal with - respectively what situation causes you all that stress... but really try to find a way out of this.
Also Psycho-Therapy can be a really good thing in that case... it can greatly help you to develop ways to deal better with stress and probably prevent a good bit of it.
Going to a therapist isn't bad at all... quite to the contrary, it can be a great experience by teaching you new stuff about yourself and life.
 

SimonSays

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Hi EPO1, you said "Back when I was a teen & bedwetting (well that has persisted unfortunately to this very day), my parents tried EVERYTHING... I mean everything".
You were (are) the one who had (has) bedwetting, not your parents. This problem were firstly your, and the way they acted, they didn't give the choice to choose or not a treatment of your bedwetting, to be agree with it so you were involved and not undergo the treatment(s).

Dont get me wrong : I dont say you didnt want to cure your BW, I just say they made the choice for you, disturbing you, and finally pushing you more into the security to wear night time diapers.

For Jter42: I m sure you ll success to stop wetting the bed as long as it s your own decision and you get support from your physician and your parents.
Being 17, you can treat this problem yourself without the closer's parents support a kid needs.
 

itsacurlyone

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As a retailer, I have sold bedwetting alarms for many years, and generally the feedback from the parents that have purchased them for their child has been very good. It has to be said that they do not work for everyone, but they certainly can be the answer to the parent's and childs dreams. Many suffer for years, but after just a short time using the product their children are often dry - and they wonder why they have not tried the product previously.

It is not suprising to me that a very small percentage of children do not respond when you hear sometimes how the child is just left to get on with it - without any support from the parent - but that is another story and only happens very occasionally.

The use of bedwetting alarms should not be thought of as 'just an alarm' to wake the child up, The alarm is used to make the body associate the sound of the noise with the sensation of needing to pee and should be considered as a 'treatment' and yes of course they will only work when the sensor gets wet as that is part of the process, so there is a learning curve. Very frequently the child is a heavy sleeper and it is necessary for the parent to wake the child with the alarm still sounding and take them to the toilet to clean up etc. However the brain adapts quite quickly to the noise and successful treatments I believe are in the 85/90% range.

There are two models of the alarm, Wireless - which has become more popular recently and corded version.

Bedwetting alarms are certainly not the answer for everyone, but the success rate is quite high from the feedback received.

I am aware that drinking fluids should be 'normal' and not be reduced, but have also heard that the caffine drinks should be swaped for something else.
 
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whisko

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i agree about alarms! they're worth trying. our 6-year-old daughter was bothered by bedwetting and decided to try an alarm. we told her that it might take a while for her body to get the idea. it only took 2 months! she's been a dry sleeper for two weeks now, including the past four days without an alarm. she's rather proud :)
 
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Tiddles

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I was about nine when I had to suffer the bed wetting alarm. In my case all it did was programme my brain to wake me up between 1 and 2 am, then again between 5 and 6 am. I hated it so much that by the end of the two weeks that I hardly slept because I kept thinking that the damn thing would go off at any time. My parents suffered too because it woke them up too, then they would dry me off, then change the bedding and re-set the alarm. I had some basic tests and the doctor said this could take some time. I soon learned that if I kept quiet about my wet bed they assumed that all was well and I had a dry night. I remember on more than one occasion that the bed was so well soaked that the only dry place was where the pillows were and that is were I slept untill that too got wet and I had to either say that I had wet the bad, gather everything up myself so no one knew how badly soaked the sheets were, got them washing before I let mum finish them off. I soon learned to strip the bed and wash the stuff myself.
 

itsacurlyone

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Hey Tiddles. I am sorry you that you sufferd with the alarm - the treatment differs from person to person. For some people it is a long journey and others it is a breeze. I am sorry that you feel that it would not work for you - just maybe if you had continued through the hoops it may have worked for you. Though perhaps you are one of the small percentage that they do not work. I am just going by feedback. But thanks for sharing your experiences and am sorry it did not work. I hope that you had a supportive parent reegarding this
 

EPO1

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@itsacurlyone:

Alarms, as I mentioned my experience with the (back then wired) alarms was horrible...
I don't doubt - as mentioned - that for some it may work amazingly well. I guess it all comes down on the why you wet the bed, how, how quickly, how much, etc and how easy it is to weak you up quickly enough.

To me the alarm back at that time (mind you that's a good lot of years gone by since) was "horrbile" on multiple levels:
It would indeed wake me up twice or thrice almost EVERY night... and yes, it reacted to becoming wet. Usually I seem to be wetting once quite "heavy" and two to four times just "slightly"... (but that's not scientific ;) ).... Back then, when the alarm woke me the first time I was soaked - or often in the midst of peeing and even though I tried to stop - I basically couldn't... it's a bit odd, I can stop peeing if I try hard enough during the day... but not at that state.... then I was wide awake, went to the toilet to try to see if I had to pee some more... put on a new diaper (at first as suggested by the doc back then who "gave" us the alarm) I wore diapers over that special "sensor-underpant".... also that underpant had to be changed and the sensor re-attached.
Tried it with bed-mats and just those underpants... same effect... same work but usually also a whet blanket / cover..

The bad part was that the alarm for me created an unprecedented amount of stress about my bedwetting back then - when I "rigged" the thing up and went to bed I was really anxious to start with, as I knew it will wake me up when I wet and I'll have to deal with the situation (yes my parents helped me with changing the bedding if that got wet sometimes... but the diapers was a thing I was quite quick to change on my own, as I felt horribly uncomfortable having or dad diaper me as a young teen... so that was my business (gladly).

After two excruciating weeks I was close to a break down from sleep depriviation, anxiety about the situation and frustration for the fact that it didn't make the wetting better (actually it made it worse, I guess due to the stress)... there's no way I would have wanted to stick with this for another two month...
As mentioned, I was happy to be back in just diapers (mind you, at that time I wasn't "fond" of diapers... but they worked and let me sleep through the night).

Again, I think it can work for some... but I find it hard to believe that there's only a few who have real issues with that thing.
 

jter42

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The alarms starting to sound like a bad option for me. I don't like the idea of being woken up in the middle of every night, I need my sleep :sad:. Although I may still buy one if nothing else works. So far though it seems they work for some and others not.

Also thanks for all the replies, and suggestions. I would reply with a quote to them all, but that would take forever. So just wanted to say gracias to everyone who has commented so far it mean's a lot. I really hope I can get rid of this problem, or at least lessen how many wet night's I have. It'd be nice to be able to have a sleepover, and not worry all night long about being found out.
 

itsacurlyone

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@itsacurlyone:

Alarms, as I mentioned my experience with the (back then wired) alarms was horrible...
I don't doubt - as mentioned - that for some it may work amazingly well. I guess it all comes down on the why you wet the bed, how, how quickly, how much, etc and how easy it is to weak you up quickly enough.

To me the alarm back at that time (mind you that's a good lot of years gone by since) was "horrbile" on multiple levels:
It would indeed wake me up twice or thrice almost EVERY night... and yes, it reacted to becoming wet. Usually I seem to be wetting once quite "heavy" and two to four times just "slightly"... (but that's not scientific ;) ).... Back then, when the alarm woke me the first time I was soaked - or often in the midst of peeing and even though I tried to stop - I basically couldn't... it's a bit odd, I can stop peeing if I try hard enough during the day... but not at that state.... then I was wide awake, went to the toilet to try to see if I had to pee some more... put on a new diaper (at first as suggested by the doc back then who "gave" us the alarm) I wore diapers over that special "sensor-underpant".... also that underpant had to be changed and the sensor re-attached.
Tried it with bed-mats and just those underpants... same effect... same work but usually also a whet blanket / cover..

The bad part was that the alarm for me created an unprecedented amount of stress about my bedwetting back then - when I "rigged" the thing up and went to bed I was really anxious to start with, as I knew it will wake me up when I wet and I'll have to deal with the situation (yes my parents helped me with changing the bedding if that got wet sometimes... but the diapers was a thing I was quite quick to change on my own, as I felt horribly uncomfortable having or dad diaper me as a young teen... so that was my business (gladly).

After two excruciating weeks I was close to a break down from sleep depriviation, anxiety about the situation and frustration for the fact that it didn't make the wetting better (actually it made it worse, I guess due to the stress)... there's no way I would have wanted to stick with this for another two month...
As mentioned, I was happy to be back in just diapers (mind you, at that time I wasn't "fond" of diapers... but they worked and let me sleep through the night).

Again, I think it can work for some... but I find it hard to believe that there's only a few who have real issues with that thing.

Hi EPO1, Thanks for your reply, I must be honest, when my children were growing up, we were very fortunate as they were dry at a very early age.

To be honest, I must be very nieve as I had not really thought of the trauma associated with the alarm for all concerned, as no one has really discussed that subject with me previously, and so I have been educated with your experience - thank you.

I was actually talking with another mother today, and she was saying much the same as yourself about the tiredness etc. as she had been sleeping in the same room with her (8 yr old son) to wake him up.. So sleepness nights for the family. I have only really heard the positive results and not gone through the same truama as yourself and many others. Bedwetting is always an emotive subject for all but not generally discussed with others outside the family for obvious reasons and not easy to deal with for all concerned for lots of reasons. Thanks for your comments and sympathise with you. I wish I had an easy answer.
 

Ringer

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Just an observation;
Half the people on this forum are trying to become bed wetters and the other half are trying to quit.
I guess the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.
 

EPO1

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Just an observation;
Half the people on this forum are trying to become bed wetters and the other half are trying to quit.
I guess the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

In my opinion: whatever floats your (or anyone else') boat...
What does it BOTHER ME as a Bedwetter if for someone it would be the ultimate fulfillment to have what I'd like to get rid of.
Vice Versa... I mean it doesn't hurt me neither physically nor emotionally if someone sees what I look upon as a nuisance as something nice... it doesn't change anyhting, I still would love to say good-riddance to my bedwetting, and the other person still would wish to be a bedwetter - no matter how much I tell him that it's not nice.

Take food... if you love something and someone else hates the same thing seriously or is highly allergic to it... no coin on the globe will make the other person *love* that dish... and no matter how much the other one hates that bit of food, you'll not going to stop loving it...

- - - Updated - - -

Hi EPO1, Thanks for your reply, I must be honest, when my children were growing up, we were very fortunate as they were dry at a very early age.

To be honest, I must be very nieve as I had not really thought of the trauma associated with the alarm for all concerned, as no one has really discussed that subject with me previously, and so I have been educated with your experience - thank you.

I was actually talking with another mother today, and she was saying much the same as yourself about the tiredness etc. as she had been sleeping in the same room with her (8 yr old son) to wake him up.. So sleepness nights for the family. I have only really heard the positive results and not gone through the same truama as yourself and many others. Bedwetting is always an emotive subject for all but not generally discussed with others outside the family for obvious reasons and not easy to deal with for all concerned for lots of reasons. Thanks for your comments and sympathise with you. I wish I had an easy answer.

Hey itsacurlyone,

thanks for your reply... I'm glad you can find some info useful from my writing / experiences ...

Yeah, well - for me these days I have come to a point where I'm "OK" with my bedwetting, I don't push myself over it day by day anymore, I have come to accept that this is a part of me - not one I'm especially fond of, but one that most likely is here to stay as it looks.
I'm happy that I can "deal" with it by wearing comfy diapers at night and pads/pull-ups for my daytime IC issues. I mean it could be far worse.

As a child / teenager though it was really awkward - not just for being a bedwetter - but for being constantly "pushed" to get rid of it with either this / that / whatever therapy, treatment, medication, gadgets... it was like the diapers were regarded as the WORST POSSIBLE "solution"... where in my opinion as a child/teenager at the time they were the only "solution" that would give me some comfort, relieve me of that stress of waking up once more in a soaked bed, suffering from yet another medication induced side effect, being tired from the sleep-depriving alarms, etc... or feeling like a guinea pig at a medical facility.
I understand, that my parents at the time were trying to do what they believed to be in my best possible interest (try everything to get rid of the bedwetting)... but they never really grasped that the whole trying and constant "failing" actually scarred (emotionally) me more than the bedwetting on it's own ever did... I felt like there was something SERIOUSLY WRONG with me all the time, even though my really loving parents always told me that it's not that bad, that it's not "important" , that they love me none-the-less,etc.. and yet it was a constant issue. for some odd reason it was being looked upon as far worse than my daytime issues (which at the time were really minor... bits of dribbling and some very very rare accidents if I couldn't get to a toilet within a shorter time (like car rides or flights...). And it was always being made into something like : "son, I'm sorry but you'll should wear a diaper for that family trip, flight, etc..."... I was always "OK" with wearing a diaper, as it was giving me the comfort and reassurance that my wetting wouldn't cause me any real embarrassment as due to the pads/diapers it never really "showed".

What kind of "hurts" me to this day is that diapers especially for bedwetting are still mostly regarded as the last possible resort... parents try so hard that the diaper never gets used unless as a last resort... it's stigmatized as ultimate fail by some, as a resignation, as something REALLY BAD.... whereas if they'd look at it as a possible "remedy" to take away the STRESS behind the bedwetting, it would never be that bad for the child I guess.
 
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I rarely have any occurences when bedwetting, jter42. But, on a computer, I checked on this goodnites website that says about these bed mats. You should go try and look at them and see what you think.
 

ScoobyDooKiddo

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Alarms never worked for me.

Soda helped cut down on the number of nights

Set your alarm for a set time every night, when you wake up go even if you don't have to try to anyways

Avoid alchoal and certain foods with caffine in it as that also causes problems. No treas either

Try going before bed even if you doing have to

I still have incidents but this helps alot for me anyways
 
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