The solution to the gas prices.

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Darkfinn

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The original idea of the diesel engine was for farmers that could 'grow' and create their own fuel. However, if we all switched to bio-diesel, then there will be less farm land for food. Which In turn, Would bring high fuel and food prices.
A valid point UnMarth... unfortunately it is one that few people understand.

Take E85 ethanol for example. It is an "alternative fuel" made from corn. The problem with this is that the gas companies are buying up as much of it as they can get their hands on... which has driven the price of corn through the roof.

Now it's just corn you say... so what? So what indeed. Corn and corn byproducts are used in a huge amount of goods. Cattle and chickens are fed corn as well... which means that now the prices of beef, milk, cheese, poultry, and eggs have gone up too. Take a look at the price of a gallon of milk or a block of cheese next time you are at the store... it is outrageous.

The one thing about old-school diesels that I like is the fact that they do run off of old cooking oil. Now it seems to me that there is a McDonalds or BK or KFC or Wendys or Hardees (Carls Jr) or any other kind of fast food joint on nearly every street corner in this vast nation of ours. These places all fry their food... and the oil must be disposed of. That is a lot of oil that is currently going to waste. So why not continue to capitalize on America's love for the artery hardening good stuff (which I consume as I type this) and start selling the stuff as fuel?

Want a car that will run off of the stuff with a minimum of modification? Get ya' an 80's model Mercedes 300D... pour it in... and go to town.
 

ballucanb

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That Oil from cooking will work, but it won't work on a cold engine, or in cold weather, I have seen something to that effect on one of the science channels.

You need to start the car and warm the fuels and then you can switch to the cooking oil, it might be Ok for a warmer area of the country, but I don't think I would want to go thru that if I owned a diesel.

If I bought a deisel car the first thing I would do, is install a few oil tanks somewhere on my property, and start buying home heating oil, No tax, and it is cheaper, not by much, than buying it at a station.

The only difference is the higher sulfer content and it has a dye in it, so the truck drivers can't use it, and the DOT checks trucks for this and fines the driver lots of money.
 

DotDotDot

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That Oil from cooking will work, but it won't work on a cold engine, or in cold weather, I have seen something to that effect on one of the science channels.

You need to start the car and warm the fuels and then you can switch to the cooking oil, it might be Ok for a warmer area of the country, but I don't think I would want to go thru that if I owned a diesel.

If I bought a deisel car the first thing I would do, is install a few oil tanks somewhere on my property, and start buying home heating oil, No tax, and it is cheaper, not by much, than buying it at a station.

The only difference is the higher sulfer content and it has a dye in it, so the truck drivers can't use it, and the DOT checks trucks for this and fines the driver lots of money.
You're right about the diesel fuel. I havnen't heard of people using heating oil in their diesel vehicles, but it is possible like you said, instead I hear of people stealing diesel fuel (20-30) gallons from truck fuel tanks to heat their homes.

I have a friend that ran the veggie oil in an old diesel benz of his. The benz didn't have a block heater (not that he could use it, parked in school lot), no glow plugs, no tank heater and was running 100% waste veggie oil. Needless to say it didn't start. Ended up towing it into a garage and putting a salamander heater on it. WVO gels at a higher temperature than diesel.
 

MysteriousVisitor

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That's nice for people who live close to work or friends, but there are lots of places that require cars. I don't know of many people who are willing to bike 4 miles in 105-degree weather to reach the store, and then 40-degree weather in the winter. The groceries would probably melt/spoil on the way home too! Biking when possible is cool, and buses work for lots of people, but some of us just live too far away from the city.
I bike about 3 miles each way to campus each day. Probably a bit more, but I've never actually measured it out.

I said this to illustrate what is wrong with the American public. Everyone bitches about gas prices. About how either TEH EBUL ARABS or TEH EBUL OYL COMPANEES are killing us. Yet people still drive everywhere. People still make unnecessary trips. People still do not look at alternatives. My family is guilty of this. My stepmother constantly complains about gas prices while driving a 12 MPG SUV around. This price that we are paying now is less then the Europeans have been paying for years. Yes, we don't have the public transport or tiny cars available to us, but not every European city has a massive public transport infrastructure.

I'm rambling, but the point is that we, as consumers, underestimate the power we have. I'm not talking about some halfass boycott. I'm talking about fundamentally changing the way we live. And now we're finally doing this. A bikestore down the road has had 4 consecutive record months of sales, all because of gas prices. And I think that our reduced driving has really affected oil prices. We've saved millions of barrels of oil compared to last year. If we continue, we can definitely reduce our oil consumption and price.
 
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Our Diesel heats up the fuel before starting, although I think that is just the fuel in the fuel line, I do not know. :p I assume most newer ones do so.
 
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