Finished The Fifteen Commandments of Storywriting

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Vexxus

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The Fifteen Commandments of Storywriting
By Vexxus, in coorporation with LeonSoryu117
An extension of the instructions by Moo

1. The chance of an outsider knowing about *B/DL or infantillism is less than 1%.

2A. Because of Rule #1, parents will not know where to buy adult-sized baby articles. In addition, there is no such thing as a retail store where such items can be bought publicly - or behind a "secret door", for that matter.

2B. The chance of any other character but the main character randomly being interested in diapers is even smaller.

3. Having something done by a female character does not make something more credible or believable.

4. Every *B/DL is one for a reason and one does not simply become an *B/DL overnight or out of mere curiosity.

5. One does not simply develop any incontinence issue for no apparent reason. Wearing diapers, whether forced or by choice, is never an apparent reason.

6. Be consistent about the age of your characters. If your main character is twelve, write about them like they are twelve. Don't make them more (or less) mature than they actually are. Put effort in making characters fit their given age.

7. Once subjected to (sissy) punishment, one (but specifically men) will not suddenly become docile.

8. Keep sexual tension down unless you're actually going to do something with it. As a rule of fist, keep it out as much as possibly anyway. Moo does not allow stories that contain actual sexual acts.

9. Do not break the fourth wall unless strictly necessary.

10. Prologues and intros are not needed. If you have to write a prologue, you haven't really written enough notes to yourself on what you want to explain to the reader. Show, don't tell.

11. Proper grammar, interpunction and spelling are necessary. With built-in applications to check these, there are no excuses.

12. The space bar, comma key and enter key are your friends. Each line of direct tense must be placed on a new line. In addition, use paragraphs of about three sentences that hold together considering content.

13. Find a balance between dialogue and description. Don't make a story a radio drama, but don't make each line of dialogue be separated by 25 paragraphs on what their pants look like.

14. Anything under 500 words is not to be considered a "chapter".

15. Plagiarism equals theft. There are no excuses. If an author is too lazy to post a story somewhere himself, he does not care enough about his own work.
 
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RoamingHermit

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Might be a dumb question, but I'm uncertain. What is "the fourth wall"? :confused:
 

Alphacore

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Might be a dumb question, but I'm uncertain. What is "the fourth wall"? :confused:

The fourth wall is a metaphorical barrier between the story/what's going on in the story and the reader, for the story to directly interact with the reader is considered breaking it.
 
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Cherub

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The fourth wall is a metaphorical barrier between the story/what's going on in the story and the reader, for the story to directly interact with the reader is considered breaking it.
Like the movie Never Ending Story? Sebastian reading the book in the movie?
 

Alphacore

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Like the movie Never Ending Story? Sebastian reading the book in the movie?

That might be framing device, I don't know, I haven't seen it. The most obvious example would be a character looking at the screen (looking at the person watching the show) and saying "Hey, you enjoying the show so far?"
 

dogboy

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Sadly, this is why I don't read many diaper stories. They just aren't engaging for these very reasons. It's not easy to write a story. If it was, professional writers would be out of a job. I read a lot of novels before I started writing, and I try to use those as models for writing. We could all learn from the great writers. As I've said before, most professional stories are mostly narrative with some dialogue. Diaper stories seem to be just the opposite. Dialogue should come naturally, out of need. You don't have to say what someone is thinking or how they are reacting to something. They simply have to say it in dialogue.

When I think of a story, I know the ending before I start writing. That way, I know where the story is going. In fact, I usually know all the major events before I write the first sentence. As a result, the story has a point and something to say. Of course, not many on this site read my stories, I guess because they aren't sexual. From what I've seen on other sites, the whole point of a diaper story is its sexual gratification. If that isn't allowed on this site, then the story should have something else to say, and that is the challenge.
 

Vexxus

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That might be framing device, I don't know, I haven't seen it. The most obvious example would be a character looking at the screen (looking at the person watching the show) and saying "Hey, you enjoying the show so far?"

The case of the Neverending Story, indeed, is a framing device. Your example is a good example of breaking the fourth wall. Other shining examples are characters from the Looney Tunes or Pinkie Pie from My Little Pony. Anything in which the characters happen to know that they are in a work of fiction or characters directly addressing the audience is, generally, breaking the fourth wall.
 

Tripped

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The Fifteen Commandments of Storywriting
By Vexxus, in coorporation with LeonSoryu117
An extension of the instructions by Moo
*snip*

11. Proper grammar, interpunction and spelling are necessary. With built-in
applications to check these, there are no excuses.

12. The space bar, comma key and enter key are your friends. Each line of direct tense must be placed on a new line. In addition, use paragraphs of about three sentences that hold together considering content.

13. Find a balance between dialogue and description. Don't make a story a radio drama, but don't make each line of dialogue be separated by 25 paragraphs on what their pants look like.

*snip*

Numbers 11, 12, and 13 are covered in great detail in the 'writing' section of our articles collection. Most of them are covered in my own article "Tripped's field guide to story writing." Sorry couldn't resist a self-plug... :tongueout:

The fourth wall is a metaphorical barrier between the story/what's going on in the story and the reader, for the story to directly interact with the reader is considered breaking it.
If you've seen the first couple of seasons of Malcolm In The Middle, you've seen 'breaking the fourth wall.' Thats when Malcolm turns and talks to the camera while everyone else around him keeps going about their own things.
 

Vexxus

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Numbers 11, 12, and 13 are covered in great detail in the 'writing' section of our articles collection. Most of them are covered in my own article "Tripped's field guide to story writing." Sorry couldn't resist a self-plug... :tongueout:

Speaking of which, I think there should be a total guide that merges both the rules, your article and the Commandments. That should be enough for both posting writers and active critiques. Furthermore, this establishes a certain standard or guideline to which everyone can refer, which renders it easier for the majority of the readers to judge whether a story is to be called qualitatively good or not.
 
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Cherub

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Of course, not many on this site read my stories, I guess because they aren't sexual.
I read your stories. My favorite so far is: The Un-training of Stanley Kaminski. To which I am awaiting the ending or closing chapter(s).
 

EPO1

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Objection:

No. 5: (one does not suddenly become incontinent):
Well it actually can happen...
There are enough people out there who - despite numerous urologist consultations - have no clue why they became incontinent, or why they out of nothing started to wet the bed.


No. 10: prologue ...why not... ? Why then sometimes a prologue can actually be found even in books considered as good literary works, even classics...?
I think if a story starts somewhere in a "complex structure" and with a certain background but there would be no benefit in adding 10 chapters to outline just that, than why not a short and strong prologue?
 

Vexxus

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Objection:
No. 5: (one does not suddenly become incontinent):
Well it actually can happen...
There are enough people out there who - despite numerous urologist consultations - have no clue why they became incontinent, or why they out of nothing started to wet the bed.
Certainly, but the amount of people that have these predicaments are even more rare than those that are "small for their age". Objection overruled.
No. 10: prologue ...why not... ? Why then sometimes a prologue can actually be found even in books considered as good literary works, even classics...?
I think if a story starts somewhere in a "complex structure" and with a certain background but there would be no benefit in adding 10 chapters to outline just that, than why not a short and strong prologue?
A good story wouldn't need anything to excuse or explain itself. Not to boast, but check the first two or three chapters of my story "True Colors". That part of the story introduces the characters, who they are, what they do, what they hide and what their world looks like. It even tells that they are not human, while making it seem natural.
I might not be the greatest writer on Earth, but you're going to have a hard time convincing me that I should have used a prologue or intro to make a blunt and dry enumeration of the base elements on which the story is constructed ;).
Again: objection overruled.
 

EPO1

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Certainly, but the amount of people that have these predicaments are even more rare than those that are "small for their age". Objection overruled.
Well bed wetting can start for no obvious reason - especial secondary enuresis has the habit of starting in quite a few people without obvious precedence.
And with day time Ic, there's a long list of medical issues that can cause incontinence...

A good story wouldn't need anything to excuse or explain itself. Not to boast, but check the first two or three chapters of my story "True Colors". That part of the story introduces the characters, who they are, what they do, what they hide and what their world looks like. It even tells that they are not human, while making it seem natural.
I might not be the greatest writer on Earth, but you're going to have a hard time convincing me that I should have used a prologue or intro to make a blunt and dry enumeration of the base elements on which the story is constructed ;).
Again: objection overruled.

Good writer or not, that isn't on debate...

A few examples: tolkien's lord of the rings... Has a prologue
Neil Gamon's highly acclaimed "American gods" has one too.
And James Joyce' "finnegans wake" would really suffer without its prologue.
These are just a few examples where introductionary texts / prologues are used - and not wrongly though.
 

Calico

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Certainly, but the amount of people that have these predicaments are even more rare than those that are "small for their age". Objection overruled.

A good story wouldn't need anything to excuse or explain itself. Not to boast, but check the first two or three chapters of my story "True Colors". That part of the story introduces the characters, who they are, what they do, what they hide and what their world looks like. It even tells that they are not human, while making it seem natural.
I might not be the greatest writer on Earth, but you're going to have a hard time convincing me that I should have used a prologue or intro to make a blunt and dry enumeration of the base elements on which the story is constructed ;).
Again: objection overruled.

I've seen books out there that have such so I don't see any difference when a story on here has it. Even one of my unposted stories have it.
 

Frogsy

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And James Joyce' "finnegans wake" would really suffer without its prologue.

Finnegan's Wake and all who have read it have suffered enough with or without a prologue.

Anyhow. Writing rules can and will be broken. Deeper writing rules I've seen include such things as: Never start with the weather. ("It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen." - 1984)

If you can break a rule and do it well, good on you. But most people around here aren't quite on the level of Orwell. So when you break rules, it's probably because you're not a great writer rather than that you're pushing boundaries.

On the other hand. Stories are about when remarkable things happen. Unremarkable things, those easily believed, aren't stories to be told and stories to be read. Unremarkable things are uninteresting. It's unremarkable that AB man never finds an AB partner and he lives alone for the rest of his sad diapered life. It's remarkable when AB man happens upon a darling AB woman. That's the story. While it's important to keep a low suspension of disbelief, it's also important to have a story. I'll have no trouble believing that you had orange juice with breakfast, went to work, did paperwork, went home, watched the news, and fell asleep. But where's the story in that? I would say that no great story would have zero suspension of disbelief. Otherwise it's not a story.
 

EPO1

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Finnegan's Wake and all who have read it have suffered enough with or without a prologue.

Anyhow. Writing rules can and will be broken. Deeper writing rules I've seen include such things as: Never start with the weather. ("It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen." - 1984)

If you can break a rule and do it well, good on you. But most people around here aren't quite on the level of Orwell. So when you break rules, it's probably because you're not a great writer rather than that you're pushing boundaries.

On the other hand. Stories are about when remarkable things happen. Unremarkable things, those easily believed, aren't stories to be told and stories to be read. Unremarkable things are uninteresting. It's unremarkable that AB man never finds an AB partner and he lives alone for the rest of his sad diapered life. It's remarkable when AB man happens upon a darling AB woman. That's the story. While it's important to keep a low suspension of disbelief, it's also important to have a story. I'll have no trouble believing that you had orange juice with breakfast, went to work, did paperwork, went home, watched the news, and fell asleep. But where's the story in that? I would say that no great story would have zero suspension of disbelief. Otherwise it's not a story.

Isn't it a tad pretentious to try to set rules, try to define Nader what circumstances and by whom those rules might be broken an the result be favorable?

Sorry but I've been an avid reader for almost 30 years and there are so many amazing books, writings, poems, etc. out there - some of them defying all "rules", written by mostly unknown authors. Yet others by great names follow every convention and still are good reads.
Besides I don't know who came up with the idea that an intro or prologue is a bad thing anyhow - after all it's just another tool in a writers toolbox.

And finnegans wake - are you kidding me??? That stuff is brilliant.
Certainly not an easy bed side lecture, but a wonderful application and transformation of language.
 

Frogsy

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I'm the pretentious one while you argue for the brilliance of Finnegan's Wake and suggest that because I dislike the jumbled up hoax of an alcohol-fueled novel that I must only read grocery store paperbacks?

riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

"Sir Tristam, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war: nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselves to Laurens County's gorgios while they went doublin their mumper all the time: nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick ..."

Anyhow, I'll just leave that there and let others decide the pretentiousness for themselves.

The quality of writers here are so bad that someone had to make a rule that asked them to spell check. If they need that rule to understand what to do, then they are the type of writer that won't understand why you don't start a novel with "Xyz woke up-" And if you don't understand the rule you're breaking; you won't understand how and when and why to break it.

I didn't make a post called the fifteen commandments, EP01. All I did was agree with you that rules need to be broken sometimes, and are brilliantly broken very often. Since it ruffles your feathers so greatly, I'll attempt to try and no longer agree with you in the future.
 

dogboy

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I read your stories. My favorite so far is: The Un-training of Stanley Kaminski. To which I am awaiting the ending or closing chapter(s).

Thanks. I finished that and put it into the Finished Stories section. I had fun writing it, making the ending chaotic. My novel ends with perhaps ten times the chaos, all the major characters coming together for the final battle. The cool thing is that you can make anything happen when you write, even sharknadoes, haha.

- - - Updated - - -

Objection:

No. 5: (one does not suddenly become incontinent):
Well it actually can happen...
There are enough people out there who - despite numerous urologist consultations - have no clue why they became incontinent, or why they out of nothing started to wet the bed.


No. 10: prologue ...why not... ? Why then sometimes a prologue can actually be found even in books considered as good literary works, even classics...?
I think if a story starts somewhere in a "complex structure" and with a certain background but there would be no benefit in adding 10 chapters to outline just that, than why not a short and strong prologue?

I think one could consider the beginning of "A Death in the Family" by James Agee as a prologue. It's brilliant and it makes me cry. The novel won the Pulitzer.
 
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Cherub

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Can you provide me a link? I seem unable to locate it.

Never mind I found it :D
 

Vexxus

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I find your lack of empathy... well, I don't find it disturbing, but does anyone of you understand theatrical irony? To clarify myself: these "commandments" are not really meant to be seen as etched-in-stone definitions, rather a compilation of things I've picked up over the past few years (and some rules by other people)

There are a lot of crappy stories out there, either written with one hand or written by people that don't do their homework. They just suck a story out of their thumb (as we say in Dutch) and hope that others will buy it. Of course, one cannot expect high quality from a beginnner, but there's a difference between a beginner and "an amateur that doesn't plan nor anticipate and neglects to steer clear of clichés".

That's what this is about: clichés. ;)
 
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