The cause or solution for your psyche

Littlewolf

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  1. Adult Baby
  2. Diaper Lover
Honestly what my reasoning for being into this subject is from past but present situations. When do you figure time for therapy intervention.
 
Therapy for being ABDL? Is that what your asking about?

Being ABDL is normal. as odd as that sounds to some people. the only reason anyone would need therapy, is if there is something that is a harm to themselves of others. ABDL is inherently not harming to self or others.

I do work with a therapist on a lot of things, and he knows about my little side. But that's never really the focus of our work as there is nothing there to fix. Being AB/DL is a normal thing. the biggest thing is to love who you are, and first accept that you are good just the way you are.

If you ever want to talk, PM me. (open invite)
 
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Howler said:
Therapy for being ABDL? Is that what your asking about?

Being ABDL is normal. as odd as that sounds to some people. the only reason anyone would need therapy, is if there is something that is a harm to themselves of others. ABDL is inherently not harming to self or others.

I do work with a therapist on a lot of things, and he knows about my little side. But that's never really the focus of our work as there is nothing there to fix. Being AB/DL is a normal thing. the biggest thing is to love who you are, and first accept that you are good just the way you are.

If you ever want to talk, PM me. (open invite)
Thank you sorry to not clarify but I meant more on the psychological side of it. Like could therapy help with the understanding of it.
 
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Littlewolf said:
Thank you sorry to not clarify but I meant more on the psychological side of it. Like could therapy help with the understanding of it.
So what do you look to gain from therapy?
I'd say therapy as an intervention should only be used if this kink is interfering with living your everyday life.
If you are living a productive happy life and ABDL is just a kink that you indulge in then I see no reason for therapy.
Now on the other hand if ABDL is consuming your life to where you are constantly thinking or indulging and neglecting everything necessities, then it's time to see a therapist. At that point ABDL might not be the true issue, but just a coping mechanism for the underlying issue.
 
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Nowididit said:
Now on the other hand, if ABDL is consuming your life to where you are constantly thinking or indulging and neglecting everything necessities, then it's time to see a therapist. At that point ABDL might not be the true issue, but just a coping mechanism for the underlying issue.
I don't think there must be something evident only on close inspection. Being concerned about your thinking doesn't necessarily call for a therapist. Instead, read this:

Are You Consumed by Your Thoughts? Missing out on being present in your life



“Life is available only in the present moment.” Thich Nhat Hanh
166053-170820.jpg


A few years ago, I went in a store, bought a drink, and left. A few minutes later I could not remember where I put the change from buying the drink. In fact, I couldn't even remember the face of the cashier or any observations about the store. It's not that I have memory problems; in fact, my memory is very strong. So what happened? I realized I had been lost in thought. I was so lost in my own story of everything I needed to do and everywhere I needed to go that I was completely unaware of what I was doing in the moment. I then started to wonder how many other parts of my life I was missing while lost in my thoughts. Was I really listening to my children, husband and friends? Was I going through the day missing interacting with people, my environment and even opportunities that came my way because I was thinking about my blog, my next meeting or my next meal?

So, I did an experiment. I decided to silently recite a mantra all day long while I was moving from place to place so I would not get lost in my thoughts. I also said my mantra before meeting with someone or while engaged in any activity. The mantra I picked that day was "love first." For me it worked as a constant reminder that my awareness, kindness and actions throughout the day were more important than my thoughts. At first it was a little awkward. I actually felt “over focused” on everyone I came in contact with and everything I did. And there were also pauses between my words as I saw the color of each person's eyes. Yet, as I laid my head down to sleep that night, I recalled the waitress at the restaurant who said she was tired because it was Friday, the doorman who told me he was taking care of his sick mother and my daughter who told me she had pasta for lunch. I remembered the breeze on my face as I walked to pick up my daughter from school and how a cup of green tea had tasted. I realized that I had gotten a lot of work done that day, and yet the day was filled with something much more. I had connected with so many people, my environment and I had even been aware of my feelings as I went about my business.

I also felt less burdened by the endless list of everything that I needed to do in the next few days because there was a new awareness of life as it was happening. I realized that there is little peace for me when I am lost in thought because the to-do list always grows and there are always more goals to achieve. Nothing ever feels completely done. Yet the replacement of my random thoughts with an ever-present mantra created a wholeness and completeness that left me satisfied exactly where I was in the moment. Maybe try a mantra or word of your own that constantly brings you back to where you are and what you are doing. You might find that there is so much more to each moment than there ever was before. The trees have many more beautiful leaves, and the sky offers so many glorious moments to pause and admire the awe of it all. We also might find that our sweet children have so much more to say than we've been hearing. And yes, ice cream. Eat ice cream while saying your mantra. It will taste like never before!

Just, maybe!!

See psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-gift-maybe/201412/are-you-consumed-your-thoughts
 
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My therapy is wearing my diapers, it is having that special bond in that special time with my wife. That does more to make me feel better about everything than anything.
 
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Littlewolf said:
Thank you sorry to not clarify but I meant more on the psychological side of it. Like could therapy help with the understanding of it.
Your good. :D(y) I wasn't understanding what you were asking, and it's something that I'm a bit sensitive to. I spent years hating my little side... that's not a place any one should be in. So forgive me if I harp a lot on loving your little... I have seen the other side.

I would recommend the book: 'Adult Babies: Psychology and Practices' by Micheal and Rosalie Bent.

littlemoosey said:
My therapy is wearing my diapers, it is having that special bond in that special time with my wife. That does more to make me feel better about everything than anything.
True... So true. My wife is slowly opening up and she keeps finding that she enjoys it more and more. this only has me enjoying the time more and it's a wonderful thing.
 
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Littlewolf said:
Thank you sorry to not clarify but I meant more on the psychological side of it. Like could therapy help with the understanding of it.
To better understand AB/DL you have to do your own research because the effects are different for everyone. Indulging in diapers, kink or your innocent little side is a coping mechanism, comfort, therapy or even a part of your lifestyle.
Acceptance of yourself needs to also come from yourself because your health physically and mentally comes first.
If you feel shame and or guilt that consumes you then it would be best to talk to someone who will take a neutral or positive stance like the people in this forum or a therapist.
 
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Howler said:
Your good. :D(y) I wasn't understanding what you were asking, and it's something that I'm a bit sensitive to. I spent years hating my little side... that's not a place any one should be in. So forgive me if I harp a lot on loving your little... I have seen the other side.

I would recommend the book: 'Adult Babies: Psychology and Practices' by Micheal and Rosalie Bent.


True... So true. My wife is slowly opening up and she keeps finding that she enjoys it more and more. this only has me enjoying the time more and it's a wonderful thing.
Thank you I have seen that book and wondered if buying it would be good
 
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littlemoosey said:
My therapy is wearing my diapers. It is having that special bond in that special time with my wife. That does more to make me feel better about everything than anything.
As you mentioned, diapers are therapeutic. See the following.

How Diapers Can Help with Mental Health Issues in Adults

Can diapers have a positive impact on our mental health? You might be wondering how that’s possible, but it’s true. Diapers can be good for our mental health in many ways, from making us feel more secure to reducing stress levels which can improve our attention span. Here are some of the most interesting ways that adult diapers can help people with mental health issues in adults.

The Basics

Age regression is the act of going back to a simpler time, often associated with childhood. This can be done through things like play, art, and music. It can also be done by diapering up. As kids we are generally more relaxed than as adults because we didn't have as many responsibilities. When people regress into this child-like state, it allows them to escape from their stresses for a little while without having to take on any new responsibilities. Age regression has been shown to help people with depression, anxiety, PTSD and many other mental health issues, not just those who were previously diagnosed with these disorders before entering adulthood.

Why Wearing Diapers/Nappies Makes People Feel Better

  1. Being diapered up can help reduce stress by providing a physical barrier between the wearer and their environment.
  2. Diapers can also act as comfort objects, providing a sense of security.
  3. For some people, diapers can act as a security blanket, providing a sense of safety and comfort.
  4. For others, diapers may help with age regression, providing a way to feel younger and more carefree.
  5. Finally, for some adults who experience incontinence, wearing diapers may be a helpful solution for managing it.

What Are Adult Baby Diaper Lovers?

ABDL (adult baby diaper lovers) are a group of people who enjoy being diapered up for this topic, typically for non-sexual purposes. For some, it may be a way to regress back to a time when they felt more innocent and carefree. For others, it may simply be a comfort thing. Whatever the reason, there is no shame in being diapered up.

What Else Can Diapers Do for Mental Health?

Diapers can also be used to help with mental health issues such as anxiety and stress. Wearing a diaper can help you feel more relaxed and secure and can even be a form of self-care for many. If you are struggling with mental health issues, please speak to a friend or doctor, but don't be afraid to consider age play or diapers as a means for coping.

Where To Start?

When it comes to diapers, there are a few things you need to take into account. For one, you want to make sure that you're getting a product that's going to be comfortable for you to wear. You also want to make sure that it's going to be absorbent enough for your needs. And finally, you want to make sure that it won't leak.

See https://tykables.com/blogs/news/how...re. They,even be a form of self-care for many
 
IcyBlue said:
To better understand AB/DL you have to do your own research because the effects are different for everyone. Indulging in diapers, kink or your innocent little side is a coping mechanism, comfort, therapy or even a part of your lifestyle.
Acceptance of yourself needs to also come from yourself because your health physically and mentally comes first.
If you feel shame and or guilt that consumes you then it would be best to talk to someone who will take a neutral or positive stance like the people in this forum or a therapist.
I'm still working on accepting myself, but doing my own research to learn why I'm into this definitely helped me feel less shame. I like diapers for comfort. Specifically how they feel and make me feel. I have high functioning autism and a behavior associated with this is sensory seeking. So I'm apparently a sensory seeker and one of the things that I seek is the sensory stimuli of a diaper.
 
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PaddedWolfie said:
I'm still working on accepting myself, but doing my own research to learn why I'm into this definitely helped me feel less shame. I like diapers for comfort. Specifically how they feel and make me feel. I have high functioning autism and a behavior associated with this is sensory seeking. So I'm apparently a sensory seeker and one of the things that I seek is the sensory stimuli of a diaper.
I can relate. My offer to talk stands, and is open to anyone.

Depending on where you are, I have a book that I want to recommend to you.
- You're Not Broken: Dr. Rhoda's Guide to Strong Self Worth for AB/DLs

It has a ton of info and may help you out.
 
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PaddedWolfie said:
I'm still working on accepting myself.
The following should be quite helpful.

8 Ways to Accept Yourself.

Learning to be OK with all the pieces of you can be hard, but with some practice, you can learn the art of self-acceptance.
While there are always ways to improve and better ourselves, in the end, we are who we are. After all, who doesn’t have good qualities they’re proud of and flaws they could do without? And we each experience success or failure at different times in our lives.
Learning to accept yourself for who you are can bring peace and calm to your life.

How to accept yourself.

  1. Forgive yourself.
  2. Practice self-compassion.
  3. Use present moment awareness and mindfulness.
  4. Acknowledge and love your abilities.
  5. Ignore your inner critic.
  6. Connect with loved ones who appreciate you.
  7. Move on from disappointments.
  8. Gain perspective on your limitations.

Self-esteem differs from self-acceptance.

Self-esteem refers to having confidence in your qualities and abilities. A person with higher self-esteem might feel worthy of good and positive experiences and feel able to handle difficult situations. In a 2017 studyTrusted Source based on data from 201 adolescents, researchers observed that a person’s self-esteem was linked to them having fewer symptoms of anxiety, depression, and attention problems. While self-esteem and self-acceptance are connected, self-acceptance refers to the act of embracing every aspect of yourself — strengths and weaknesses. You might think of it this way: Self-esteem is the quality of fuel you use, and self-acceptance is how you drive on that tank of fuel.

Why is it so hard to accept yourself?

From the moment we’re born, how we fit into the world is determined and highly influenced by our caregivers. This gives them a lot of power in terms of how we understand and see ourselves. For instance, if your caregiver encouraged, loved, and accepted you, your self-acceptance will often be much different from a child who experienced the opposite. When we start school, we’re measured by how well we perform on tests and in class, as well as how we assimilate with our peers. All this can contribute to self-worth and acceptance. As we get older, life circumstances, relationships, and how we’re treated by others can influence how readily we accept ourselves. It can be hard for many of us to accept ourselves if:
No matter how your self-acceptance was shaped up until this point, there are practical ways to work on accepting yourself, right now, just as you are.

How to start loving and accepting yourself.

There are several ways you can work on self-acceptance:

Try self-forgiveness.

If you’ve hurt people in the past or acted in ways you’re not proud of, forgiving yourself can feel hard. But doing so does not mean you condone your behavior. Instead, it means you accept what you’ve done, take responsibility, and are giving yourself permission to move on. One approach Trusted Source some therapists use to help people practice self-forgiveness incorporates:
  • responsibility
  • remorse
  • restoration
  • renewal

Practice self-compassion.

Self-compassion involves giving yourself warmth and understanding during difficult times or when you feel inadequate.
Some ways to practice self-compassion include:

  • Talking to yourself like you would to a friend.
  • Writing down how you’d like to help yourself.
  • Putting your situation into perspective.
  • Engaging in self-care such as meditation, exercise, and healthy eating.

Lean into mindfulness.

While we often cannot control life’s circumstances, it is possible to wake up each day and try to live more mindfully. For instance, each night you might try creating a purpose for the following day. Something as simple as setting a time to wake up and going on a walk before you work can give you direction. If you want to tackle a bigger purpose like finding your dream job, you might try adding in job searching or updating your resume to the day.

Applaud your abilities.

Maybe you make a great apple pie or are the person your friends turn to for a listening ear. Or perhaps you’re a hard worker or have a green thumb. Whatever your strengths are — no matter how small or big — you could write them down as a way to applaud yourself. Whenever you’re slow to see what’s praiseworthy about yourself, you can read the list aloud.

Ignore your inner critic.

It’s easy to be your own worst critic and listen to your negative thoughts. But when you feel self-criticism coming on, you can try to put it on hold, take a step back, and think about what you would tell a friend who was thinking that about themselves.

Cultivate your inner circle.

There’s nothing like family and friends you can trust and share your deepest thoughts, concerns, and funny stories with. Surrounding yourself with people who welcome you for who you are is a great way to feel accepted. Like-minded people can be found in online support groups or forums as well.

Mourn and move on from unsatisfied aspirations.

When your hopes and dreams aren’t met, it’s easy to feel disappointed. However, allowing yourself to feel disappointed is healthy. Moving on when you’re ready can also help. You could try memorializing the effort to strive for that vision in life and closing that chapter mentally in favor of a new goal.

Realize acceptance is not settling.

Accepting your flaws and failures does not mean you’re settling for less. In fact, knowing your limitations can go a long way for mental well-being. For instance, instead of focusing on how impatient you are with children, embrace how well you connect with older individuals by visiting your grandparents often or volunteering at a nursing home.

Let’s recap.

Learning to accept who you are can be challenging, especially the parts of you that you believe are not your “best.” If you’ve had a hard time with self-acceptance in the past, know that there are ways to embrace the present, gain perspective on the past, and love everything in-between.

See
psychcentral.com/lib/ways-to-accept-yourself
 
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