The book you are reading...

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weswissa

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Tell everyone what you are reading and discuss it. I am reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Pheonix. It is a good book except for Sirius dieing, I always cry when I read it. I'm such a wuss. I'm reading all seven of the books in succession because I am bored. After I get done reading the seven books. I will read Angels and Demons by Dan Brown. I loved The Da Vinci Code and a friend told me this was the prequel. So I am going to read it. There I have discussed my book, discuss yours.
 

chevre

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I am a strange loop by Douglas Hofstadter. Great book, I just need to finish it. It's much about Hofstadter's thoughts on how the human mind works and about self-referential systems. I'll write more about it later but I need to sleep now :p.
 

Takashi

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Alex Rider #5-Scorpia

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Alex Rider, the spitting image of his father in so many ways, is about to find out just how closely he is his father's son. When Alex learns that his father was an assassin for Scorpia, the most powerful terrorist organization going, his world shatters. Now Scorpia wants Alex on their side, and Alex wages a war of conscience he no longer has the will to win. Until, that is, he learns of Scorpia's latest plot: an operation known only as "Invisible Sword" that will result in the death of thousands of people. Unless he can stop it first . . .
 

weswissa

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Alex Rider #5-Scorpia

Synopsis
Alex Rider, the spitting image of his father in so many ways, is about to find out just how closely he is his father's son. When Alex learns that his father was an assassin for Scorpia, the most powerful terrorist organization going, his world shatters. Now Scorpia wants Alex on their side, and Alex wages a war of conscience he no longer has the will to win. Until, that is, he learns of Scorpia's latest plot: an operation known only as "Invisible Sword" that will result in the death of thousands of people. Unless he can stop it first . . .
Is that the back of the book... :D
 

dogboy

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I recently finished all three books in "The Golden Compass" trilogy. These were very strange books indeed. They were written for kids, but talk about higher church doctrine, and I think it would be way over their heads. The author tries to push his own agenda on the reader. He's an agnostic, hates the organized church, and pushes homosexuality. In the third book, two gay angels are kissing, etc. I read the books for our librarian because she wasn't sure if they were appropriate for Jr. High kids. I said I thought there was a lot they would not understand.

Personally, I thought they were well written, but that they weren't really written for children, and they were too childish for adults, not that I don't mind childish, it just needs to be the right kind of childishness. I objected to the fact that all of the bad guys were people of the church. I know that organized religion has made a lot of mistakes along the way, but this bashing was ridiculous. I also thought that the ending was very unsatisfying. The boy did not get the girl, but again, I think the author was pushing his own sexual agenda.
 

Roland

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Naked Lunch by William Burroughs.

It's an experimental novel with some sci fiction characteristics, and is an autobiography of his 25 year drug addiction, his experience with homosexuality and his encounters with other oddities of the drug world. (Not including homosexuality, don't get me wrong, that's a different subject).

Unless your a tough reader, this book needs at least one more re-reading to comprehend it. It's hard to keep up with it's developments, as he often skips into something different during mid sentence, switches from dialogue to storyline, stops the scenario to write a chapter about a totally different experience, etc. As said, it's rather experimental in it's genre.
 

Jaiden

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I recently finished all three books in "The Golden Compass" trilogy. These were very strange books indeed. They were written for kids, but talk about higher church doctrine, and I think it would be way over their heads. The author tries to push his own agenda on the reader. He's an agnostic, hates the organized church, and pushes homosexuality. In the third book, two gay angels are kissing, etc. I read the books for our librarian because she wasn't sure if they were appropriate for Jr. High kids. I said I thought there was a lot they would not understand.

Personally, I thought they were well written, but that they weren't really written for children, and they were too childish for adults, not that I don't mind childish, it just needs to be the right kind of childishness. I objected to the fact that all of the bad guys were people of the church. I know that organized religion has made a lot of mistakes along the way, but this bashing was ridiculous. I also thought that the ending was very unsatisfying. The boy did not get the girl, but again, I think the author was pushing his own sexual agenda.
The trilogy is called His Dark Materials, not The Golden Compass. The Golden Compass is just the name the first book was published under in North America for some reason when it was known as Northern Lights everywhere else.

Anyway, I read them as a kid (teen for the last one) and absolutely adored them. Pullman doesn't push his ideas anymore than C. S. Lewis did in Narnia and I love how he doesn't talk down to his readers and actually explores properly interesting ideas. I don't get the 'sexual agenda' bit at all, there were gay characters, sure, but there should be gay characters in any book - children's or otherwise - with such a large cast of characters. I don't think he was pushing anything there, he just wasn't whitewashing it either. It is brilliantly written so as to keep the attention of children but also fiercely intelligent and interesting. Exactly the sort of thing kids should be reading. I also loved the ending, incidentally; bittersweet, poignant, brave enough not to follow convention and rather quite moving, I thought.

As for me, I just finished The Constant Gardener, which was a good read and an interesting diversion from John Le Carre's earlier career. All the interesting plot twists, tensions and motivations you would expect but a modern setting which makes it a bit more accessible than his older Cold War stuff. Right now I'm reading Corridors of Power by C. P. Snow. Not a great book by any means- the characterisation is markedly poor and his writing is very, very dry - but if you've an interest in the machinations and workings of the British political system it is quite illuminating.

Next on the list is Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol in an attempt to continue sampling some of the Russian greats.
 
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"his dark materials" is the series that got me into reading. i was about 13 so it was perfect.

the book i'm reading now thought is much better and i recomend it to everyone. it's "the legend of drizzt" by R.A. Salvator. there's 13 books in the whole series, but the story is broken up at about 3 books each. i'm on the 6th book called "the halflings Gem" and it's incredable. the book has a fantacy setting, similer to the lord of the rings. it has drizzt the dark elf, brunor the dworf, reigis the halfling, wulfgar the barbarian, and catti-brie the human as main characters. it's a bizzar mix, but it makes for an amazing story. the story line is increadable with many twists and turns, but the best part are the fight scenes. there are constantly battles where the 5 fight for their lives. at one point, the 5 have to fight a deamon black dragon that didn't breath poison like most black dragons, but it breathed a black cloud that saped you will to fight.

over all, it's the best story i've ever read.
 

Lowie

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I'm currently reading: Hot Rod Magizine..

the current book im reading is Silverwing. Really good so far!
 

BromeTeks

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I just finished reading The Watchmen today, Now I am moving on to either Atlas Shrugged, or a non-fiction book on quantum physics (what can I say, I find it fascinating)
 

Fire2box

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I am in the late middle of the Narnia series and half way into the last Artemis Fowl book. Narnia is really good and the first 4 books of Artemis Fowl rock.
 

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I JUST finished The whole Twilight series a few days ago, took me about a week and a half, was SUCH a good series.

I figured she wouldn't be able to end it well but she did, it ended perfectly, I dunno how she did it, but I'm happily satisfied, although I will admit, I would like to see more. I'm not craving it like I do other books which are not really ended *cough* The Golden Compass *cough*.

There are only two books/series I would recommend more than the Twilight series and those are, The Looking Glass wars, and His Dark Materials, which is the Golden Compass series.
 

Emileigh

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I just read the fourth book of the morganville vampire series by rachel caine, they're really good books. I also finished reading the book breaking dawn by stephanie meyer (I think?) I absolutely LOVE the twilight series, and breaking dawn was by far the best one out of the series!
 

mizzycub

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At the moment I'm not. I go through phases of reading for a week or two, where I'll get through five or six books, then not pick one up for a month or so. Part of this comes from primary school reading which was compulsory for half an hour every day. I was not that good at it, often didn't get a book I enjoyed and it made reading a chore. Then in secondary school he had to analyse every last word. For me this spoilt books and took the enjoyment out of the occasional book I cam across and really enjoyed. Now I don't do English I am slowly recovering.

The next book I am likely to read is "The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy". I love that series of books, and want to read it again.
 
D

daria7483

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Tell everyone what you are reading and discuss it. I am reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Pheonix.
Wow, coincidentally I'm reading Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Or rather, I was. I always re-read the books before the movies come out so I can judge the movie more accurately, but now the movie's been pushed back to next summer so I stopped reading and need to find something new. Hmm, maybe I'll go to the library today.
 

Chillhouse

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Hearts in Atlantis

I'm on the second novella, and so far I don't know what it's about.
 

Mingus

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The trilogy is called His Dark Materials, not The Golden Compass. The Golden Compass is just the name the first book was published under in North America for some reason when it was known as Northern Lights everywhere else.

Anyway, I read them as a kid (teen for the last one) and absolutely adored them. Pullman doesn't push his ideas anymore than C. S. Lewis did in Narnia and I love how he doesn't talk down to his readers and actually explores properly interesting ideas. I don't get the 'sexual agenda' bit at all, there were gay characters, sure, but there should be gay characters in any book - children's or otherwise - with such a large cast of characters. I don't think he was pushing anything there, he just wasn't whitewashing it either. It is brilliantly written so as to keep the attention of children but also fiercely intelligent and interesting. Exactly the sort of thing kids should be reading. I also loved the ending, incidentally; bittersweet, poignant, brave enough not to follow convention and rather quite moving, I thought.
Agree on the ending, sad as it is. And I agree about the gay characters--there are two gay characters, who feature only in the third book, in a series with dozens of characters. Their love is depicted with sensitivity--it's not about sex at all. Moreover, most of the characters in the book (as in real life) are straight, including most of the principles.

I recently finished all three books in "The Golden Compass" trilogy. These were very strange books indeed. They were written for kids, but talk about higher church doctrine, and I think it would be way over their heads. The author tries to push his own agenda on the reader. He's an agnostic, hates the organized church, and pushes homosexuality. In the third book, two gay angels are kissing, etc. I read the books for our librarian because she wasn't sure if they were appropriate for Jr. High kids. I said I thought there was a lot they would not understand.

Personally, I thought they were well written, but that they weren't really written for children, and they were too childish for adults, not that I don't mind childish, it just needs to be the right kind of childishness. I objected to the fact that all of the bad guys were people of the church. I know that organized religion has made a lot of mistakes along the way, but this bashing was ridiculous. I also thought that the ending was very unsatisfying. The boy did not get the girl, but again, I think the author was pushing his own sexual agenda.
I don't think that the books are over children's heads. Children will get different things from the books on subsequent readings as they mature. I know I did. But children can certainly appreciate the first two books for the stories, and come at the theological, philosophical, and social questions they raise later.

I'm really not at all sure that Pullman was pushing a 'sexual' agenda with the ending. For one thing, it's not at all clear whether Will and Lyra have sex as such, although it's clear that there is an important emotional bond between them. I don't think they're books for children or for adults--Pullman has made it quite clear in interviews that he wants to focus on stories, and that is what the His Dark Materials trilogy is about. It is, of course, a reworking of the Eden story, heavily influenced by Blake and Milton (the title is a quote from the first book of Paradise Lost). I don't think the agenda trumps the story or the characters. I think The Amber Spyglass is a difficult read, and probably better for young teens and up (about 14 or 15 for most kids). It's more thematically complex, for one thing. But the Golden Compass/Northern Lights is beautiful, moving, deep, thought-provoking, gripping, beautifully-written--really everything I want in a book. I recently re-read the trilogy, and was in tears again. I first read all three in 9 days when I was 13 (and they were school days, so I really didn't do much besides go to school and read them). They're my sisters favourite books, but I love them to. At the risk of attracting peoples' ire, I think they're head and shoulders above Tolkien and the Narnia books, in quality of thought, story-telling, and writing.

I'm working on a novel by Kazuo Ishiguro, A Pale View of Hills, which is about a Japanese woman's recollections of life in Nagasaki after WWII (before she moved to Britain) as she comes to grips with her daughter's suicide. It's very well written, as was the other Ishiguro novel I've read, The Remains of the Day. A lot of it deals with memory--how and why we remember our pasts a certain way, how the past influences the present. It also looks at relationships between men and women, and between parents and their children. It shifts in time, as well, so that you consider the course of Etsuko's life.

Also working on book on contemporary political philosophy (very interesting and thought-provoking, if quite difficult), and a history of Dehli during the Indian uprising of 1857 (but I haven't picked that up in a week or so).
 

Charlie

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I've just started reading The five people you meet in Hell, which is a parody of The five people you meet in Heaven (which was very enjoyable).

I know that this book will be annoying and only a bit funny, but I'll probably read it all anyway.
 
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