Special needs clothing

Trevor

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When I have seen it, it doesn't hit me in quite the right way. The concept is on-target but I'm looking for baby stuff, not adult, and the differences have made them unappealing.
 

icklespace

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hey i am interested in looking at some of this stuf. could you send me some links??
 

Hakanloaim

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I would say that special needs clothing is real clothing as opposed to ABDL clothing which is more like a costume. For me, an ABDL onesie (for instance) could only be some sort of toy, while a special needs onesie is the real thing. Maybe this is a market for ABDL companies.

I actually bought a special needs onesie, in fact at time it was cheaper than the ABDL equivalent if I recall correctly, plus it can be considered as some sort of support (having a special needs child costs a fortune). I don’t wear it much though, but it’s amazing during the winter underneath regular clothes. Mine came from Wonesie (Australian brand), a simple, plain white short sleeved.
 

cantthinkofaname

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little keeper sleepers are pretty good, and they are cheap and made in adult sizes.
 
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sissybaby34

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Take a look here, I have 2 of the "Hansops" with back zips. They are very good quality.

 

diaperfooties

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The one I recently bought is little keeper sleeper. Love it well worth the money.

IMG_2019-09-02_14-08-37.JPG
 

Hakanloaim

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How cute! A few sizes to big on the shoulders though.
 

diaperfooties

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How cute! A few sizes to big on the shoulders though.
Thanks yeah they have a lot of different colors and different kinds as well check it out of you want to.
 

Treelad

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I would say that special needs clothing is real clothing as opposed to ABDL clothing which is more like a costume. For me, an ABDL onesie (for instance) could only be some sort of toy, while a special needs onesie is the real thing. Maybe this is a market for ABDL companies.

I actually bought a special needs onesie, in fact at time it was cheaper than the ABDL equivalent if I recall correctly, plus it can be considered as some sort of support (having a special needs child costs a fortune). I don’t wear it much though, but it’s amazing during the winter underneath regular clothes. Mine came from Wonesie (Australian brand), a simple, plain white short sleeved.
This is exactly why I prefer medical diapers as opposed to abdl diapers.
 

Seasonedcitizen

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Take a look here, I have 2 of the "Hansops" with back zips. They are very good quality.

I have a few of their onesies. When I'm out shopping for the day I will wear a pull-up so I can use the urinal. I can't close the crotch snaps because I can't open them without dropping my pants. They are well made.

I got a back zipper suit which I will wear under my clothes this winter with a megamax diaper. It should be fun.
 
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specs41

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I'm into special needs clothing for other reasons (mostly the fact it's "special needs" and it is super comfy in itself). I feel it.

To anyone who is also curious, I recommend any regular adult clothing that is accessible. Especially work apparel or elderly clothing in your size or accessible wear at Walmart or Target. Get full body pajamas that don't have a special design and wear them backwards with some booty socks. Get diapers that fit well and wear them backwards, like what real parents do with real babies who are naughty. Get anything with drawstrings or waistbands that are a little too snug. Or virtually any sweats with jogger or cinch ankles, or elastic jeans (since they are so baby-like). They fit well for playing, are snug fit, don't have holes or easy removal options. They are often a tad tight when paired with the bigger diapers and there's a bulge.
 
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buridan

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I bought a Little Keeper Sleeper a few years ago. Putting it on by myself is possible, but it's a 15-minute project with a lot of contortions. I can take it off in about 15 seconds.
 

Rave1

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I think I'd rather get something like this (link below) since it seems cheaper than the ABDL specific ones and higher qualify materials, and I'm very sensitive to synthetic materials. I think the designs are fine, back when I was about 5 I had footed pyjamas which were solid blue so I don't necessarily need babyish motifs to feel little
 

bounduptoplease

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Anyone else find themselves shopping/fantasizing the special needs clothing shops? The idea of anything that makes my access to my diaper impossible....ya, makes my pee pee feel funny.

I have my stuff custom made to prevent nappy access, works for me but yes a little pricey for true nappy restraints.
 

RedPandaDL

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I would say that special needs clothing is real clothing as opposed to ABDL clothing which is more like a costume. For me, an ABDL onesie (for instance) could only be some sort of toy, while a special needs onesie is the real thing. Maybe this is a market for ABDL companies.

I actually bought a special needs onesie, in fact at time it was cheaper than the ABDL equivalent if I recall correctly, plus it can be considered as some sort of support (having a special needs child costs a fortune). I don’t wear it much though, but it’s amazing during the winter underneath regular clothes. Mine came from Wonesie (Australian brand), a simple, plain white short sleeved.
I find this a bit humorous, because I have a 14 year old special needs child and didn’t even know special needs clothing existed. I checked out one of the links and the onesie was designed to keep the child from taking their clothes off. My daughter doesn’t have motor control of her hands, so I guess that was never an issue.

I can vouch for special needs items being expensive. Things like strollers, car seats, therapy aids, bath chairs, etc. are quite expensive. Wheel chair modifications to a van are a whole nother level of expensive. Luckily we have a state Medicaid waiver that pays for a lot of stuff and good Medical insurance.
 

icklespace

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I would say that special needs clothing is real clothing as opposed to ABDL clothing which is more like a costume. For me, an ABDL onesie (for instance) could only be some sort of toy, while a special needs onesie is the real thing. Maybe this is a market for ABDL companies.

I actually bought a special needs onesie, in fact at time it was cheaper than the ABDL equivalent if I recall correctly, plus it can be considered as some sort of support (having a special needs child costs a fortune). I don’t wear it much though, but it’s amazing during the winter underneath regular clothes. Mine came from Wonesie (Australian brand), a simple, plain white short sleeved.
Well for me just thinking about a back zipping sleeper made out of fleece is verry comforting. I love being safe and secure but also snuggly. Why isn't comforting clothing using a big market. And it don't seem hard just to size up what babies wear anyways
 
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