"Officials consider parole for Charles Manson follower with cancer" - Opinions?

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Charlie

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Hmmm...
Well if her being in prison/hospital is costing the tax payer a lot of money, I say let her go. She's not got long to live, she's paralysed and is missing a leg, I say giving her three months of freedom isn't being all that compassionate... I think that it's worth releasing her, just to save money.
 

Martin

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Allowing people to go from prison due to health is a delicate thing, right now they may only let the most severe terminally ill people go - later it might be all terminally ill people. One thing leads to an other. And I think nobody should be allowed to go from prison on they're state of health. What I do think though is that they should pay for they're health care in the same way as all other people outside of jail. Being in prison shouldn't mean that you can get free health care at the taxpayer's expense (unless that's available to the general public too).

This may sound harsh but what gives those people the right to leech off of society after what they've done. That would mean that if you do something bad enough to be put into jail you'll get free health care while the people that abide to the law won't. Call me harsh but I think that's crooked. If anything they deserve it less. If you don't like the punishment then don't do the crime. In Dutch they have a saying: "If you burn your ass you'll have to sit on the blisters." She burnt her ass, let her sit on her blisters.
 

ballucanb

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I would let her go home to die, it's not like someone in that condition is going to run away, you couldn't get that far if you did run.

And if she trys just stick her back in.
 

Kip

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Allowing people to go from prison due to health is a delicate thing, right now they may only let the most severe terminally ill people go - later it might be all terminally ill people. One thing leads to an other. And I think nobody should be allowed to go from prison on they're state of health. What I do think though is that they should pay for they're health care in the same way as all other people outside of jail. Being in prison shouldn't mean that you can get free health care at the taxpayer's expense (unless that's available to the general public too).

This may sound harsh but what gives those people the right to leech off of society after what they've done. That would mean that if you do something bad enough to be put into jail you'll get free health care while the people that abide to the law won't. Call me harsh but I think that's crooked. If anything they deserve it less. If you don't like the punishment then don't do the crime. In Dutch they have a saying: "If you burn your ass you'll have to sit on the blisters." She burnt her ass, let her sit on her blisters.
I agree 100%. Very well said.
 

ayanna

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She's 60 years old, she's paralysed on one side and has had the opposite leg amputated, and she is dying from brain cancer with maybe 3 months to live. Her medical treatment and paying for prison guards to watch over her has cost state taxpayers more than $1.4 million since March. That's about $400,000/month for the last 3-1/2 months!

I don't really see the problem with releasing her...or at least allowing her family to be with her in these last days. She's paid for her crime...she's spent her entire life behind bars...and now she's dying a slow and painful death.
 

LittleAdam

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She killed a woman and her unborn baby. That is one of the worst crimes I can imagine. Sorry to be cruel here, but a slow and painful death is exactly what this prisoner deserves. The death penalty as they do it these days would be way too quick. Torture is fitting for this wretch.
 

Footed P.J.

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I would have been OK about her early release, but it really depends on the situation. Not sure where I'd draw the line. Not heartbroken at her denial, though.
 

SteveC1981

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Isn't it aggravating that the Manson family gets free health care and most of us who work don't have such a thing?

Granting a terminally ill murderer parole just so they can have hospice care on the outside still doesn't send the right message in the long run, so taxpayer dollars never get saved either way.
 

diapernh

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I don't really see the problem with releasing her...or at least allowing her family to be with her in these last days. She's paid for her crime...she's spent her entire life behind bars...and now she's dying a slow and painful death.
I do agree with you, release her to a hospice house. or to a family members house, let her live out her days with an ankle bracelet tracking her.

She killed a woman and her unborn baby. That is one of the worst crimes I can imagine. Sorry to be cruel here, but a slow and painful death is exactly what this prisoner deserves. The death penalty as they do it these days would be way too quick. Torture is fitting for this wretch.
yes, she did something very henious (sp?), If i am correct, she has been in prison for the last 30 to 40 years. A slow and possibly painful death is what she is enduring at this time. I take it you have never been there to see somebody take their last breath fighting end stage cancer. I hope nobody ever has to see that, but it is a fact of life. I would hope that no matter what somebody had done in life, that they would at least be allowed to be near family and friends in their final days.

I for one would have let her out, even if it were just to a hospice center where the staff would make sure she was comfortable in her final days, where her friends and family could be with her when it is time for her to pass.
 

Martin

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Were the women and her unborn baby comfortable when they were stabbed to death.
 

quattrus

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Generally speaking, the way a society deals with penalities for their criminals is one of the main "civilization meters" that tells you how much evolved this society is.

Although I wouldn't be glad of paying for the medical treatments for a brutal murderer, and although the following is not a wrong consideration:

Were the women and her unborn baby comfortable when they were stabbed to death.
...I must also recognize that on the other hand the "an eye for an eye" penality was the standard criteria applied in the middle ages. A bit outdated, don't you think?
 

LittleAdam

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yes, she did something very henious (sp?), If i am correct, she has been in prison for the last 30 to 40 years. A slow and possibly painful death is what she is enduring at this time. I take it you have never been there to see somebody take their last breath fighting end stage cancer. I hope nobody ever has to see that, but it is a fact of life. I would hope that no matter what somebody had done in life, that they would at least be allowed to be near family and friends in their final days.

I for one would have let her out, even if it were just to a hospice center where the staff would make sure she was comfortable in her final days, where her friends and family could be with her when it is time for her to pass.
Uh huh, I get your point, and no I've never had to see someone dying from cancer and I hope I never do. But she is in prison for a reason..for life, and she should stay there until her life ends.
 

SteveC1981

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I've lost relatives to cancer and trust me...terminal cancer is something you wouldn't wish on anyone, not even your worst enemies. :eek:

I'm not quite sure where the money adds up to though...I doubt she is staying at the country-club prison where Martha Stewart did time and corrections officers make about as much as teachers do, so how does that add up to President Bush's yearly salary every MONTH to take care of her?

Uh huh, I get your point, and no I've never had to see someone dying from cancer and I hope I never do. But she is in prison for a reason..for life, and she should stay there until her life ends.
 

Corri

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Oh no! Not the famous Manson Family!
Given the crimes they committed... they deserve life behind bars. Manson DOES NOT. He is a mentally ill individual and needs proper treatment.
However, having many people around be with cancer... I'm saying let her go. Its a waste of tax payer money to keep her in, and it is also inhumane to not let her body deteriorate in a place like that (for the other prisoners). God knows how long she has left.... just let her go and die outside.
 

tiger2

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she's sick, i say let her rot to death (in prison)
i studied manson for history and will say this
they have all showed minimal remorse, the most remorseful they have ever gotten was when a parole was up.
 

dogboy

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Whether in jail or out, it probably doesn't matter in her case. Tax money is paying for her treatment in jail, and would pay for it out of jail, since she isn't employed with health insurance. As for even knowing where she is, I doubt it, if she has brain cancer. Either way, her life is over.

I watched my mom die of cancer. For weeks she lay in a comma. She had come to live with me and my wife, but was at the house only for a week before she became very ill. We had sold our first house and bought a ranch so that she could get around in her wheel chair. However, she never saw that house because of her comma. She laid in the hospital bed for weeks, not knowing that we sold our old house, moved into the new house, closed her apartment down, and moved the furniture to our new home. So much happened that she was not aware of. Then, one day I was sitting with her, and she simply came to. I told her all that had happened, and she was so happy. We had a lovely conversation. That night she slipped back into the comma, never to come back. What a miracle that day was.
 
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