NHS continence clinic self referral.

HappyNappin

Est. Contributor
Messages
644
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Little
As per title, has anyone in the UK been able to 'drop in' to an incontinence clinic for a check up, tests or diagnosis?
I know normally you would need to see a GP first.

What are the clinic's like?
Do you just talk to a nurse, or do they give you a sheet to fill out, etc.

I'm getting increasingly worried about leakage, usually after peeing, sometimes before as well but I had an urge episode the other night, I got home and had a really sudden urge as soon as I got out the car, I couldn't get the door unlocked in time and filled my boxers before I got up the stairs to the loo.

Even on normal days if I'm not wearing a nappy my boxers stink of stale urine when I take them off, even if I've only had them on an hour or 2.

I'm getting increasingly hassled buy family members to stop wearing 'pads' (nappies) and go get checked out.
But I'm extremely nervous about the whole thing.
 

Furrytum

Will smile for pancakes.
Est. Contributor
Messages
564
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
No referral is needed to visit a continence clinic. Simply phone them directly and make an appointment.

Initial visits typically include an assessment and education on treatment options. Other experts on staff will provide help in other areas, including training on how to perform pelvic floor exercises.

Clinics may also offer incontinence supplies, including vaginal cones, bed pads and pull-ups.

(I cut and pasted this from a website, it's not my personal experience.)
 

TheWetOne

Est. Contributor
Messages
60
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Sissy
  3. Incontinent
In my experience, in all the continence I've used in the UK you don't need a GP referral. I've simply phoned up and explained my situation, and have been given an appointment. The nurses, I have found, are usually brilliant, and will never criticise or ostracise you in any way. Yes, they do assessments and take your history of what is relevant to their service; there may be some forms to fill out, but it is all kept very confidential as it should be. Believe me, these nurses will know what's best for you and advise you accordingly, and they will also take your wishes and needs into account too.

Go for it, I'm sure you will not regret it.
 

winterheart01

Est. Contributor
Messages
1,276
Age
38
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Diaper Lover
  3. Babyfur
  4. Incontinent
Even outside the UK, in the central europe part you don't need a referral for that.
Not even for stomach issues (for which I was surprised) since I asked my endocrinologist to arrange a referral due to complaints and they said I could make an appointment myself just fine but I still had them do it because otherwise you're put in a very long waiting list and I was having moderate gastroparesis symptoms back then.
It does seem to depend on the hospital, one already asked for a referral before I could even see the doctor , while others do not.
 

Minih

Est. Contributor
Messages
101
Role
  1. Incontinent
I've looked into it a couple of times in different NHS areas, and it's always been a case of self-referral (interestingly, I've never had a GP mention it to me at all). I've never been to one though (couldn't really see the value in going), so I couldn't tell you what it's like.
 

TheWetOne

Est. Contributor
Messages
60
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Sissy
  3. Incontinent
I've looked into it a couple of times in different NHS areas, and it's always been a case of self-referral (interestingly, I've never had a GP mention it to me at all). I've never been to one though (couldn't really see the value in going), so I couldn't tell you what it's like.
You say you don't see the value in going? Why ever not? You say you are incontinent; it's the staff at the continence clinics that assess you to decide what is best for your condition, be it medication, referral on to urology maybe, or pads/nappies/diapers. If you are in the UK then you are entitled to make use of them, so why wouldn't you?
 

Minih

Est. Contributor
Messages
101
Role
  1. Incontinent
You say you don't see the value in going? Why ever not? You say you are incontinent; it's the staff at the continence clinics that assess you to decide what is best for your condition, be it medication, referral on to urology maybe, or pads/nappies/diapers. If you are in the UK then you are entitled to make use of them, so why wouldn't you?
I've been fortunate to have had some very pro-active GPs. In the past fifteen years, I've seen approximately four consultants, three senior registrars, two registrars, and inumerable nurses and specialists. In the past three years alone (Covid caused a few delays), I've had eight different tests, and am now at the point (again, many of these having been repeats of earlier tests) where, according to my current consultant, I've been put through every test with any scientific or medical value that relates to my problems. I've tried numerous drug treatments, some on a hope-for-the-best basis, and am currently waiting (without too much expectation of success) to hear whether I qualify for exceptional funding for another drug treatment.

Aside from free pads (which will be Molicare - I've checked - and they don't fit me well), I don't see what else they'll do for me. They list online the programme they offer for managing symptoms and diagnosing problems, and I've already done all of it through the GP and hospital.
 

winterheart01

Est. Contributor
Messages
1,276
Age
38
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Diaper Lover
  3. Babyfur
  4. Incontinent
Something I noticed from many that get pads/diaper supplies from NHS is that many seem to get molicare, they must seem to have a contract with them o_O
 

HappyNappin

Est. Contributor
Messages
644
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Little
Something I noticed from many that get pads/diaper supplies from NHS is that many seem to get molicare, they must seem to have a contract with them o_O
The contracts vary depending on where you are and your health board, up here its ID, But was tena, and attends before that.
Cumbria was abena, Newcastle molicare etc.

I know there's zero chance of me getting any sort of useful pads off of them, but the idea of the other treatments fills me with dread.
 

Pongoandperdi15

Est. Contributor
Messages
126
Role
  1. Incontinent
I get Tena off my continence service can't say I was thrilled at first but Tena have put a lot into development and the plus & super have improved a lot over the years while my usual go to ID have gone down in quality over the years
 

PCS

Est. Contributor
Messages
2,311
Role
  1. Private
Something I noticed from many that get pads/diaper supplies from NHS is that many seem to get molicare, they must seem to have a contract with them o_O
Some areas have Formacare.

In fact, NHS supply chain is the only way to get the EasySlip (cheapest plastic backed option) in the UK.
 

TheWetOne

Est. Contributor
Messages
60
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Sissy
  3. Incontinent
I have only ever had ID or Tena, which I currently get (Maxi Slip) which I am perfectly happy with. They do the job.
 
Top