Need to get rid of mice... No luck...

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I'm having issues with mice as of late and I am running out of options. As some of you know I still live with my parents (I know... laugh it off), so in order to deal with them the only real solution (that they will accept) is to set traps and block any point of entry. Unfortunately the mice have been avoiding the traps and are beginning to become a huge problem. We use glue traps and are baiting them with everything we know mice love (peanut butter, cheese whiz, the pumpkin bars they got into, etc) but nothing seems to work. They seem to leave my stash alone, but stored used ones are a different story. I could shower, come back and the bag is already chewed through (approx. 20min) and that's a real problem. I would greatly appreciate ideas short of calling an expert that will effectively trap mice (dead or alive) so that I can remove them from the house.
 

IanRoberts

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Poison the diapers is what id do, put something on it that will KILL the rat. Personally if I saw one I would throw an M-80 into it's hole. Or I'd shoot the little fuck with a cork or rubber shot. Of course though you Probably dont have a spud cannon or an M-80 so buy some RAt poison and soak whatever the little buggers are going for with it.
 

Near

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Rats are attracted to used diapers, but not dry ones? Gosh those things are creepers ^^.

I guess the best tip I would have for you is to buy a small thrash can that has a lip, that way it will be very difficult for the rats to get to them (just make sure to wash it often so the smell doesn't set in). The thing with rat poison is that it's, well, poison and thus not something to be handled casually. Anyway, good luck getting rid of those pesky rodents. I've never had rats in my house but we had to deal with both mice and ants in the past, and its not fun :(
 
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Glue boards are a fine way to catch mice. Place them along walls rather than out in the open, as mice tend to run along baseboards.
 
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crazykittensmile

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A cat would probably be the best way of removing mice, but I assume that getting (or even borrowing) a cat is not an option?

If the traps aren't working, then perhaps try a different sort of trap and see if that works. Put the trap in a place you know they are likely to visit, ideally next to a wall as animals are likely to stay close to the wall, rather than run into the middle of an open space, to remain safe. Are you sure that you have mice, and not rats? If you have rats then you will need to use a trap especially designed for rats, being as how they are larger and stronger. Rats are smarter too, and it is usually recommended that you first lay out a trap which is not set so that they become used to it and learn that it is safe, thus they learn it is not dangerous, and then after a few days set the trap and it has more chance of catching them, as they are not trying to avoid it. Even if it is mice you are dealing with, the same may work.

If they are attracted to your used diapers, then you could try poisoning the diapers or putting a trap amongst the diapers. Otherwise, I would say that you need to try and avoid leaving anything attractive to the mice (diapers, food etc) where they can reach it, as it will encourage them to keep coming back to your home. Try to find out where the mice are getting into your home or individual rooms, and try to block those areas off. Keep all food in wall-mounted cupboards, and if possible sealed inside chew-proof containers (eg: tins, jars). Don't leave anything you know is attractive to them (including used diapers) where they can get to it. Vacuum regularly to get rid of any crumbs etc that might have fallen.

We had rats in my house last year, and after following all of the advice we were given we still could not get rid of them, and they seemed to be wise to all of our traps. Often the traps would be gone off and the food gone, but nothing had been caught. In the end we had to get an expert in, he put down super-strength poison and this seemed to do the job. You may be able to buy poison without the need to call in an expert, although if you have pets or young children in the house you may want to consider whether it is safe. As I have a cat (the rats were behind the cupboards where she couldn't get to them) we decided to get an expert in as they were able to lay the poison properly and ensure it was pet-safe. If you do buy poison then you can lace areas or foods you know they will go for, and some poisons are attractive to the mouse/rat on their own so there is no need to hide them in food. Bear in mind though that if the mice are actually living in your house, and not just visiting it, then the poison will take a while to work and might result in them dying under floorboards or in other areas where you cannot get to them to remove the corpses. A short while later you will have the smell of this to deal with, and this may be followed by a fly infestation.

Therefore, before going down the poison route I would try again with another type of trap, that way you know they are not dying somewhere within your home. If you choose to try a humane trap which catches the mice alive then bear in mind that you will need to drive the mice some distance away from your home to release them to ensure they don't find their way back into your house - ideally release them somewhere away from any homes so that you do not pass the problem onto anybody else.
 
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JDdl

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Get a cat, and in a week they will all be gone, a cat is the best exterminator that you can get. Anyone who has a cat knows that.
 

diapernh

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peanut butter with the humane traps seems to work, glue boards with the PB in the smack dab middle. There are some glue traps that fold up to a tube, these will force the mice to enter the tube to get the bait. The only problem with the poison is that they die in your walls....when they die, it smells like a poopy diaper

Now with the humane traps they stay alive for a little bit, then i just drown the things in the trash can.
 

CuddleWoozle

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This is going to sound really odd, but I have a couple of ferrets and have never had mice in here at all. I think it's because ferrets are weasels and weasels are natural predators of any rodent. So I honestly think that the funky ferret odor they get at times help keep the rodents away.

If that fails, try catnip. Mice, and I think rats, usually hate the smell of it. I'm not sure why, but it's true for mice at least. I had a pet one that I used to give jingly cat toys to and one of the balls I gave him had catnip in it and he would go out of his way to stay away from it. I figured out what was wrong and took it away and he was fine.
 

Siddy

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Am i really that much of a pest >O_O<
 

Shinxy

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Get a cat, and in a week they will all be gone, a cat is the best exterminator that you can get. Anyone who has a cat knows that.

This, if you really can.
Used to have a some-what bad mouse problem before we adopted out cat, and sense then, we have barely seen one.
If ya can't, I suppose my best guess is to put your used diapers in something they can't physically get to.
Maybe an enclosed box of hard plastic? I use something like that for mine, and I don't think they can chew through that.
And if not that: glue traps. Those things work amazingly to keep rats out of certain areas.
 

Wambles

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I advice that you do NOT try poisoning the mouse because it will end up dying in a crack or a hard to reach area and it will stink up the building. Funny how this topic suddenly arose because we had ONE mouse for a few weeks and we finally killed it earlier this week. It was very smart and also avoided the traps. Persistence is the key. Keep up with the traps and dont be afraid to move them into different corners of the house.

We got rid of our mouse problem earlier this week because I seen the mouse in the middle of the night and MOVED a sticky trap somewhere it didn't expect.
 
A

acorn

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I hate mice’es to pieces, too.

Mice will be attracted to used diapers, as they smell of ammonia (urine). Another smell that they cannot resist is that of common household bleach. When you go to prepare food on a counter top, that you had previously cleaned using bleach some time ago, it’s a given that it had curious visitor in the meantime and you are in fact working off a dirty surface.

Your new family pets simply love to eat whatever you are having yourself. They will feed wherever food can be found. Armed with this new found knowledge, you need to practice scrupulous cleanliness to insure that they cannot get food from anywhere but the traps. Do not use a kitchen bin for food and clean up food spillage immediately.

Take note of Babyjess’s second paragraph on baiting a trap. Let them get used to feeding from a trap for a couple of days, before setting the spring. Put fresh bait in the traps every two to three days and continue to set traps for at least two weeks after your last catch.

To add to diapernh’s warning about poison. If you are not versed in the art of; handling, setting out, accounting for loss, retrieving the unused and disposal all leftovers; Stay the hell away from it, remember it is dangerous to children and pets also, even long after your wildlife population has moved on.

Finally a word of warning, maybe you should lie low for a while, as the furry population on here will most certainly be 'put out' by your outright hostility towards their brethren.
 

TerryWhite

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Ah-hem, just what exactly do you do to live mice once they are caught on the glue traps?

Glue boards are a fine way to catch mice. Place them along walls rather than out in the open, as mice tend to run along baseboards.

They aren't a "fine way" for anything. They're excessively cruel - the animal gets caught on a glue trap, starts to panic and struggles, ripping its skin off and breaking its limbs in the process. They also tend to gnaw their legs off while trying to escape. I don't like mice in my house as much as the next guy, but that doesn't mean it's right to torture them like this just for being mice. They should be killed humanely and swiftly, torture is never right. I find glue traps an absolutely disgusting way to kill any animal and I believe they should be outlawed. The trap instructions practically encourages people to throw them out in the trash alive so they're even in more prolonged misery, starving to death. Prolonged misery = cruelty, and it's quite sad some people find this acceptable.

Mice might be pests, but they still feel pain, and it's not their fault that they're just trying to survive. I can't believe people are recommending glue traps when there are traps on the market that are just as effective, and don't involve the same level of cruelty. Perhaps some of you should have been at my workplace a few weeks ago, where we found a mouse on a glue trap - its right eye was hanging out of its socket, its hind limbs twisted and broken, its belly skin partially torn - and it was practically squeaking/screaming in pain as it tried to get off. It was covered in its own urine and faeces, in fact the whole trap was. Who knows how long it was there for, must have been hours.

I'm sorry, but that is NO F-ING way to kill an animal, regardless if it is a "pest" or not (as if that matters anyway). To be perfectly honest, I'm GLAD the glue traps aren't working for you. Call me a PETA-ite or a hippy, I don't care - but you don't need to be a PETA card carrying member to say that inducing slow, painful deaths to any animal (when you can just be quick about it) is ethically wrong on many levels. Before someone interjects with "but would you rather have them poop everywhere, endanger your health, etc"... no, no I wouldn't. That is besides the point because the issue isn't the killing of them (which I don't disagree about), it's about the method. Torture/prolonged cruelty isn't ever necessary.

Expecting the typical "but they're just mice", "who cares", etc etc as justification for being lazy/overly cruel to them... but I at least hope you guys see where I am going with this.

---------- Post added at 04:22 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:02 PM ----------

Here is a couple of things that might make people reconsider glue traps:

1) A video of them in action.

2) The traps coming under legal review in NZ based on scientific literature (no surprise, they're banned there now):

Glueboards can be described as non-lethal or restraining traps. That is not to say that trapped animals will not die on a glueboard, but such death will arise as a result of being permanently stuck, leading to dehydration or suffocation, rather than through primary operation of the trap.

In testing, of 40 mice placed on two brands of glueboard, 35 survived for 24 hours attached to the board. At various stages during this period, most animals:

struggled vigorously when initially placed on the glueboard. In an apparent attempt to free themselves, animals stretched, twisted, and pulled on body parts caught in the glue; some mice bit and chewed on strands of adhesive or on their hair embedded in the adhesive. This action often resulted in additional body parts becoming embedded in the glue…(and)…as a result of struggling, patches of hair were sometimes pulled out of the body or limbs, exposing bare, raw patches of skin; legs were sometimes broken by vigorous struggling.

Normal eye condition lasted for about 1 h in most animals. Pathological conditions developed…(and)…sometimes progressed…so that the eye and eyelids became covered with a thick, gelatinous exudate which, in its severest state, was milky white and could not be removed by blinking the eye.


These reported reactions indicate a significant amount of distress and pain over a prolonged period. As further indication of distress, the study reports that:

Within 3-5 h after capture, most of the animals showed heavy defecation and urination…(and)…by 24 h, the wastes were often smeared over much of a mouse’s body.

3) A wildlife site which has good info.

None of these sources are affiliated with PETA or any animal-rights group. If someone did this kind of torture to a dog or cat, they'd get put to jail. But I suppose that since it's a "feral" animal, or "vermin", that must make it OK then? Cruelty is cruelty - what kind of animal it is, is irrelevant. It's the mindset that counts. People who think it is OK to torture animals have something wrong in their heads, whether it be pest or pet. Now, I'm not saying that anyone here is into that sort of "thing", but using glue traps comes very close to that line IMO based on the information that has been presented.
 
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racer

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Two things, point of entry and the food source. It is simple, you remove all points of entry and what is bringing them there, the food source. Removing the food source alone will cause them to go someplace else.
Placing out traps is not going to solve your problem alone, and is more likely to just bring more mice into your room looking for the scent of the bait.

Your first step should be to remove anything that is a possible source of food. Dont leave any open food laying around, place any open food in sealed containers and up high, like in the upper cabinets, not the bottom ones. Keep dog and pet foods in sealed containers, dont leave it sitting around in open bowls.
After you get rid of the food sources, your second step is to seal all the entry points in your room (and preferable any other room they are at). This means pulling all your furniture away from the walls, and going inch by inch around your room looking for any holes or gaps. Plug any hole or gap that is a quarter of a inch or larger, and don't leave any place unchecked for holes. If there is a gap under your door, apply a rigid door sweep (bought at any hardware store for a few dollars).
Problem solved.

---------- Post added at 04:50 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:19 AM ----------

Prolonged misery = cruelty, and it's quite sad some people find this acceptable.

What do you think happens when a snake in the wild constricts a mouse slowly squeezing the life out of it, or simply just eats it alive, or injects a painful toxin into it.
All those animals out in the wild arnt all gathered around a fire singing kumbaya together!
Taking away there food source and not using a trap can just as easly cause them to die a painful death from starvation, or to be killed by other predators.
It might be a painful death, but we are talking about killing the mice with reason, not simply finding mice to kill just for the hell of it.
Mice carry a very large number of diseases, and one can get sick very easy and possibly die from coming into contact with mouse urine and feces.
If you had to chose between the painful killing of a person or a mouse, what one would you chose to kill?
This argument would be different if someone was just killing without reason, but killing for survival is a universal part of life on earth, you do away with killing for survival and food, and all life on earth will cease to exist.

The way I see it, the saying "no killing" is like saying you want to kill on a massive scale, so in reality, who is being more humane here?

---------- Post added at 05:02 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:50 AM ----------

If someone did this kind of torture to a dog or cat, they'd get put to jail. But I suppose that since it's a "feral" animal, or "vermin", that must make it OK then?

actually, yes, your allowed to shoot a wild dog or cat, that is perfectly legal as long as you follow all the gun safety rules for your state. Even someones pet that escapes, doesn't have a collar on, you can shoot them as if it was a wild cat or dog. You could even then cook them up and eat them if you were really wanted (you would have to be pretty sick or starving).
The one job I had, this barn was over run with wild cats, and they shot them all the time to try to keep them under control. If they didn't do this, they would attack you while trying to walk threw the door, and a wild cat (just like a domestic one) can rip hunks of flesh off of you!
Cats are small, so what do you think happens when someones aim is just a little off, they just wound the cat then it goes off a suffers for days or longer before it dies!

I am not saying I would ever like to kill a cat or dog, and would definantly feel bad if I had to, these sorts of things are just part of life, its how life works
 
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Ah-hem, just what exactly do you do to live mice once they are caught on the glue traps?



They aren't a "fine way" for anything. They're excessively cruel - the animal gets caught on a glue trap, starts to panic and struggles, ripping its skin off and breaking its limbs in the process. They also tend to gnaw their legs off while trying to escape. I don't like mice in my house as much as the next guy, but that doesn't mean it's right to torture them like this just for being mice. They should be killed humanely and swiftly, torture is never right. I find glue traps an absolutely disgusting way to kill any animal and I believe they should be outlawed. The trap instructions practically encourages people to throw them out in the trash alive so they're even in more prolonged misery, starving to death. Prolonged misery = cruelty, and it's quite sad some people find this acceptable.

Mice might be pests, but they still feel pain, and it's not their fault that they're just trying to survive. I can't believe people are recommending glue traps when there are traps on the market that are just as effective, and don't involve the same level of cruelty. Perhaps some of you should have been at my workplace a few weeks ago, where we found a mouse on a glue trap - its right eye was hanging out of its socket, its hind limbs twisted and broken, its belly skin partially torn - and it was practically squeaking/screaming in pain as it tried to get off. It was covered in its own urine and faeces, in fact the whole trap was. Who knows how long it was there for, must have been hours.

I'm sorry, but that is NO F-ING way to kill an animal, regardless if it is a "pest" or not (as if that matters anyway). To be perfectly honest, I'm GLAD the glue traps aren't working for you. Call me a PETA-ite or a hippy, I don't care - but you don't need to be a PETA card carrying member to say that inducing slow, painful deaths to any animal (when you can just be quick about it) is ethically wrong on many levels. Before someone interjects with "but would you rather have them poop everywhere, endanger your health, etc"... no, no I wouldn't. That is besides the point because the issue isn't the killing of them (which I don't disagree about), it's about the method. Torture/prolonged cruelty isn't ever necessary.

Expecting the typical "but they're just mice", "who cares", etc etc as justification for being lazy/overly cruel to them... but I at least hope you guys see where I am going with this.

---------- Post added at 04:22 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:02 PM ----------

Here is a couple of things that might make people reconsider glue traps:

1) A video of them in action.

2) The traps coming under legal review in NZ based on scientific literature (no surprise, they're banned there now):



3) A wildlife site which has good info.

None of these sources are affiliated with PETA or any animal-rights group. If someone did this kind of torture to a dog or cat, they'd get put to jail. But I suppose that since it's a "feral" animal, or "vermin", that must make it OK then? Cruelty is cruelty - what kind of animal it is, is irrelevant. It's the mindset that counts. People who think it is OK to torture animals have something wrong in their heads, whether it be pest or pet. Now, I'm not saying that anyone here is into that sort of "thing", but using glue traps comes very close to that line IMO based on the information that has been presented.

What you do with the rodent after it has become trapped is entirely up to you.

When I was an exterminator, we had a guy who--in front of a client--pulled a still-living rat off the glue-board by its tail, bashed it on the concrete a few times, and asked the client where the trash can was. Not exactly how I like to do things.

As for the rest of your points, different people do different things.

If you eat animals, your food has probably been tortured or at least tormented. If you eat vegetables, then they, too, have been tormented. All for your personal eating pleasure. Killing rodents has nothing to do with pleasure; it is removing pests from areas where we are disinclined to see them.

As this is the goal, glue boards are a fine idea.

I myself would prefer to use other means (either live-catch or the T. Rex insta-death traps), but perhaps OP just wants the mice gone. For this, glue traps work fine--the mice become stuck and are therefore not wandering around in the residence.

I note that you have not contributed any advice on how to solve OP's problem, but have instead chosen to pull out a straw-mouse.

There are some people who are afraid--to the point of hysteria and self-injury--of mice and rats. I would not prefer to see them suffer over a mouse; as I would prefer a different kind of trap (see above), I would put glue boards down if this was what the person wanted to do.

Tell you what: do in Oz what they do in China[1] and eat them. If you are willing to do this, then poison is out. If you are unwilling, then we come to your observation that "what kind of animal it is, is irrelevant." It's all protein after all, is it not?

[Mouse-]Food for thought.

[1] Yes, they do. The Northerners ship rats down to the Southerners (I think that's the way it goes), who in turn consider rats a delicacy. Then again, next to some of the things that Szechuan folks eat--and I speak here from personal, direct, and prolonged experience--rats are a welcome reprieve.
 

TerryWhite

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What do you think happens when a snake in the wild constricts a mouse slowly squeezing the life out of it, or simply just eats it alive, or injects a painful toxin into it.
All those animals out in the wild arnt all gathered around a fire singing kumbaya together!

Since when are we talking about wild situations here? How is this even relevant to anything I have said?

A snake can only use the tools that it is available to it - it has no other choice. Not to mention that comparing human action to that of a snake is simply a naturalistic fallacy - snakes have no moral thought, they just do it to survive based on an instinctual behaviour. See, unlike animals in the wild - we have a choice.

Are you saying just because nature can be brutal sometimes, means that our own brutality is justified? Does it make it right for me to torture an animal, for example, just because a snake may slowly constrict its prey with no conscious thought about it?

It might be a painful death, but we are talking about killing the mice with reason, not simply finding mice to kill just for the hell of it.

Well, killing isn't even the issue here, as I have explicitly said. You might have a reason to kill, but what is your reason to make it very slow and painful? Shouldn't one be minimising pain if one is to kill something? That is why we shoot to kill when hunting, or breaking a rabbit's neck if it is still alive after the dog has mauled it. Is that not the right thing to do in those circumstances (ie. to stop the animal from further suffering)?

Mice carry a very large number of diseases, and one can get sick very easy and possibly die from coming into contact with mouse urine and feces.

The same can be said for most other animals. Everything carries disease - the only way you can get it "easily" is if you are too careless. That is not the point, though.

If you had to chose between the painful killing of a person or a mouse, what one would you chose to kill?

This question makes no sense at all. You're implying here that killing something painfully is the only way to be rid of a nuisance and/or health concern... no, it is not. To answer your question, of course I'd rather kill the mouse - but there's never realistically going to be a situation where, say, burning a mouse alive (torture) is going to make you any more or less safe.

This argument would be different if someone was just killing without reason, but killing for survival is a universal part of life on earth, you do away with killing for survival and food, and all life on earth will cease to exist.

It appears you either missed my point, or didn't read what I said. And I don't know where this survival/food part comes from, it's like you're implying that I said we shouldn't kill at all (which I did not) Again, I will specify:

That is besides the point because the issue isn't the killing of them (which I don't disagree about), it's about the method.

This has nothing to do with killing per se. I'm criticising the way they are being killed. A slow death vs a fast one. How is causing a slow and painful death to any animal morally justifiable if the means are there for a humane/swift kill?

The way I see it, the saying "no killing" is like saying you want to kill on a massive scale, so in reality, who is being more humane here?

Again, you are missing the point, presuming I am against killing, which I am not.

actually, yes, your allowed to shoot a wild dog or cat, that is perfectly legal as long as you follow all the gun safety rules for your state. Even someones pet that escapes, doesn't have a collar on, you can shoot them as if it was a wild cat or dog. You could even then cook them up and eat them if you were really wanted (you would have to be pretty sick or starving).

Clearly you can't see the distinction between humanely killing a pest animal vs torturing one to death. Are you telling me it is perfectly legal for me to torture someone's pet that escapes? No. People who did this were arrested and prosecuted. I am just highlighting the double standard here - where doing some of the things we do to feral animals to a domesticated one would get you into trouble.

Since when is it ever acceptable to torture any animal to death, regardless of its status?

The one job I had, this barn was over run with wild cats, and they shot them all the time to try to keep them under control. If they didn't do this, they would attack you while trying to walk threw the door, and a wild cat (just like a domestic one) can rip hunks of flesh off of you!

You shoot them, that's fine, but you don't torture them... do you? Do you stick them in vats of glue and force them to maim themselves/starve?


I am not saying I would ever like to kill a cat or dog, and would definantly feel bad if I had to, these sorts of things are just part of life, its how life works

If torturing animals is someone's part of life, then they need to re-evaluate it. You don't seem to understand what point I was trying to make, you've successfully misinterpreted my argument from "killing is OK, torture is not" to "killing is not OK". Gee, thanks.
 
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WildThing121675

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I'm for using a cat myself... my parents had mice in their house when they moved back to Ohio cause my sister's idiot boyfriend never helped take care of the house. My mom and dad's cat so far since they've been back has killed 3 mice, and chased out at least two my dad thinks.

Mice are a nuisance. That's for sure. They get into everything.

WildThing121675

When mice know there's a cat in the house, they stay away from it.
 

TerryWhite

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What you do with the rodent after it has become trapped is entirely up to you.

What I'm saying is that acts of cruelty should never be encouraged.

As for the rest of your points, different people do different things.

So?

If you eat animals, your food has probably been tortured or at least tormented. If you eat vegetables, then they, too, have been tormented.

Proof? I get my meat from local farms where I know that have humane standards... in addition, there are animal cruelty laws which pertain to farm animals. Torturing farm animals is counter-productive, pointless and gives rise to bad meat.

Killing rodents has nothing to do with pleasure; it is removing pests from areas where we are disinclined to see them.

As this is the goal, glue boards are a fine idea.

I don't agree that they are "fine", because they are an inhumane device that tortures the animal on them, when quick kill snap traps exist.

For this, glue traps work fine--the mice become stuck and are therefore not wandering around in the residence.

Except that my argument is an ethical one, not of practicality.

I note that you have not contributed any advice on how to solve OP's problem, but have instead chosen to pull out a straw-mouse.

I made a point about glue traps - how awful/cruel they are. It was an expansion to the discussion of trapping - it was not a strawman, because last time I checked, I did not misinterpret the OP's position. Perhaps you could accuse me for going a little OT, but definitely not "straw-mousing" here.

There are some people who are afraid--to the point of hysteria and self-injury--of mice and rats. I would not prefer to see them suffer over a mouse; as I would prefer a different kind of trap (see above), I would put glue boards down if this was what the person wanted to do.

Too bad said hysteria clouds rationality. People do stupid things when they panic. Just because someone has a phobia of mice doesn't mean it is right to stick one on glue paper, and force it to maim itself and starve to death. Not when it can be killed more mercifully. Sorry, but that's torture in my books - no amount of irrational hysteria justifies something like that.

Tell you what: do in Oz what they do in China[1] and eat them. If you are willing to do this, then poison is out. If you are unwilling, then we come to your observation that "what kind of animal it is, is irrelevant." It's all protein after all, is it not?

Congratulations for taking that quote completely out of context. It doesn't matter what animal it is when it comes to cruelty, because the mindset to intentionally prolong something's pain is still there. Whether it is a rat, a dog, or a cat - it is sick.

---------- Post added at 04:28 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:14 AM ----------

Finally a word of warning, maybe you should lie low for a while, as the furry population on here will most certainly be 'put out' by your outright hostility towards their brethren.

I don't really mind that people kill animals - may it be for pest control/food etc just as long as it is done humanely. What I dislike immensely are the people who do things like use glue traps and simply throw the in the rubbish with the poor thing still alive, or catching a rat in a cage and pouring boiling water all over it, etc. But when I state this very obvious point, for some reason I am being accused of being anti-killing. Either that or I really don't know why people are trying to defend the torture of animals. Meat was mentioned, but even then, laws exist in place for that.
 

Kalis

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They sell a box style trap that uses a battery to humanely and quickly electrocute a mouse, if you are unable/unwilling to set a standard spring-bar trap. Glue traps are inhumane, but in some very densely infested situations, they are faster. Mice really like cashews and chocolate, thet have always been the best2 baits for me. The traps need to be set along the travel routes(usually along a wall or other hard edge). The reason rats and mice travel along walls is not primarily fear. It is because they use their whiskers as sensory devices, rats have very poor vision. Hope this helps.
 

racer

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Since when are we talking about wild.....

I am not even going to reply to what you said, as it would be pointless. When you pick apart my post that much and reply to every sentence individually, your taking away the overall idea I was trying to convey. If you read the whole thing all together and not fragmented, the idea I was trying to send was that animals, domestic, wild, humans, we all suffer that it is part of nature/life, and that there is no humane way to kill something. One does what they need to do and hopes the mouse doesn't suffer that much, but you cant take suffering out of the equation. All life dies, killing/dying = suffering, thats pretty much all I said, but I am sure if you break it all apart you can make it mean whatever you want :dunno:
 
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