Messing around with Port Forwarding..

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Fire2box

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Well after only downloading at pretty slow speed on BitTorrent sometimes I decided to finally get around to the whole port forwarding or port opening things on my router to MY computer only.



So I enter the Ports that I guess BitTorrent and other programs like that use, (6881-6889). Then it asks me to enter Protocol timeout the problem is I have no idea what to type in here! Here's a picture of what I am working with...



I am trying to find out what goes into the boxes in the red circle, I see that it says 86400 for TCP and 600 for UDP but I tried both by themselves and it still wouldn't take it. So yeah I am at a major loss right now. <_>

Thanks for the help in Advance.
 

Fire2box

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Well that did work but my torrent downloads showed no improvement. I guess those ports were already opened.
 

mm3

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Before I begin -- I lol'd when I saw AT&T's logo in the logo space (Homeportal 1000HG eh?). I'm sure all ISPs do it, it just makes me shake my head...
Bah, nevermind me... anyway.

So wait, you're using your ISP's given modem/router? Or do you have a router on top of your modem? Because if the latter is the case, then you're configuring the wrong device.

Assuming that the latter isn't true, and that you're configuring a modem/router hybrid from your ISP (a la Verizon), then you need to make sure of the following:

-Your computer is set to receive a Static IP address from your router/modem (hybrid?)
-You need to put the port a third time into Map to Host, this is essentially what it sounds like, a "map" that leads back to your computer.
-Your firewalls are allowing those specific ports through.

If you do not have a static IP address assigned to your computer from your router's DCHP, I can either walk you through it here or you can IM me if you like (see profile).
 

Fire2box

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Before I begin -- I lol'd when I saw AT&T's logo in the logo space (Homeportal 1000HG eh?). I'm sure all ISPs do it, it just makes me shake my head...
Bah, nevermind me... anyway.

So wait, you're using your ISP's given modem/router? Or do you have a router on top of your modem? Because if the latter is the case, then you're configuring the wrong device.

Assuming that the latter isn't true, and that you're configuring a modem/router hybrid from your ISP (a la Verizon), then you need to make sure of the following:

-Your computer is set to receive a Static IP address from your router/modem (hybrid?)
-You need to put the port a third time into Map to Host, this is essentially what it sounds like, a "map" that leads back to your computer.
-Your firewalls are allowing those specific ports through.

If you do not have a static IP address assigned to your computer from your router's DCHP, I can either walk you through it here or you can IM me if you like (see profile).
I use the router given to me by AT&T since it covers the whole house with a Wi-Fi blanket at 2.4ghz wireless B/G. Anyways it seams I opened my ports from this router on only my computer and not my home network. All I am trying to do is get Torrents to download fast even if by a little bit.
 

mm3

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AT&T is a DSL service, yes? Not downing on your ISP, but DSL isn't the fasting of connection methods.

Be sure to check your torrent client to see if it is set to change port on startup. If it is, be sure to disable that and set an appropriate port. Also note that your ISP might block incoming connections on those ports, you never know. Make sure that your PC has a static IP address, so that the forwarding sticks to your computer even after a reboot (which thus changes your DHCP-assigned address).
 

Fire2box

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AT&T is a DSL service, yes? Not downing on your ISP, but DSL isn't the fasting of connection methods.

Be sure to check your torrent client to see if it is set to change port on startup. If it is, be sure to disable that and set an appropriate port. Also note that your ISP might block incoming connections on those ports, you never know. Make sure that your PC has a static IP address, so that the forwarding sticks to your computer even after a reboot (which thus changes your DHCP-assigned address).
It is indeed DSL and my dad pays for it while I manage the network. Anyways the only non DSL option here is with Comcast and they want about 60 dollars per month for non-cable customers. Pretty much it was AT&T DSL or dial-up. There's no fiber optical lines here yet.
 

chevre

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1) Make sure that your Torrent client is set to report your public IP.
2) Opening ports won't necessarily increase your torrent download speeds. It just gives you more peers to cheese from. Basically:

Connectable peers can connect to connectable peers.
Unconnectable peers and Connectable peers can connect to each other.
Unconnectable peers cannot connect to other unconnectable peers.
 

mm3

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My 22Mbit DSL begs to differ. Wheres your cable-god, now?
my cable-god? Well, the maximum is 30Mbits :) (with 5-10Mb/s upload to go with it)

22Mbit DSL means nothing if you don't get a static IP and unblocked ports to go with it.
And, who's your ISP? I'm curious as to what service has 22Mb/s on *phone lines*. Pretty hard to believe...
 

Sawaa

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my cable-god? Well, the maximum is 30Mbits :) (with 5-10Mb/s upload to go with it)

22Mbit DSL means nothing if you don't get a static IP and unblocked ports to go with it.
And, who's your ISP? I'm curious as to what service has 22Mb/s on *phone lines*. Pretty hard to believe...
Static IP and no port blocking from the ISP end.
ISP is TPG, but pretty much every ADSL2+ ISP offers the same thing. Up to 24Mbit downstream sync, dependent on distance to the exchange. Maybe you should investigate the technology, before you find it 'hard to believe'? :p
 

mm3

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I found it hard to believe because I didn't think that standard RJ-11 telephone wire was capable of such speeds xP
 

Sawaa

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Well it's got as many data wires as standard Cat5e/RJ45. Infact, you can network quite successfully with RJ11 plugs, they fit right into an RJ45 socket~
 

mm3

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lolwut. I don't think I can connect my PowerBook to my router right now with RJ-11.

EDIT: Just tried to back me up. Nope. And as many data wires? Check your phone, right now. I'll wait...

...


...


There's 2, right? And how many are on a standard RJ-45...?

I really don't see where you're heading with this.
 

Sawaa

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According to the EIA/TIA standards you MUST be able to plug in a "RJ11" into a "RJ45". And you can. In-fact, there are many larger OEM PC's out there from the likes of HP and Dell that have a single RJ45 plug that you can either plug an RJ45 into for networking, or an RJ11 in for use as a dialup modem~
Comparing pinouts, while it's true RJ45 plugs have 8 pins vs 6 pins used for RJ11, Cat5E spec only requires FOUR pins to be used (Green/Green-White/Orange/Orange-White) for basic networking. Applications such as GbE and PoE use the additional pairs, but you only need pin 1/2/3/6 for Ethernet to work, and the RJ11 (which contains six wires, except in cheaply made cables which eliminate the 'unused' wires) standard provides that.
Where I'm heading is the fact that carrying information at speeds of 24Mbit is perfectly feasible on standard phone copper; so you shouldn't act like you know everything~
 

mm3

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I'm not acting like I know everything, thank you, i'm simply asking questions because apparently there's something I don't know.

And I am quite aware that RJ11 can fit into RJ45, The fact that most "telephone" RJ11 cables only have two pins is what led me to *ask a question* and test some things out.
 

chevre

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RJ-11 and RJ-45 only refer to the connectors at the ends of the cables. So, saying "RJ-11 cable" really doesn't make much sense.
 

Sawaa

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...except not, given you can use the terms to refer to the wire count; which will never be higher than the pins available in the connector~
 
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