If You Had a Kid

If your child was a bedwetter, would you automatically get them diapers

  • Yes

    Votes: 74 47.4%
  • No

    Votes: 18 11.5%
  • If they asked

    Votes: 44 28.2%
  • Other

    Votes: 20 12.8%

  • Total voters
    156
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FullMetal

Guest
Alright, so I was just wondering. If you had a kid who wet the bed, would you diaper him? Not really like, powder and baby oil, but give them GoodNites/Pull-Ups or something. I thought about this in the thread that Raccoon made.

I am not sure if I would, as I said before. If the kid specifically asks for them, of course I would give them to him. But if not, I am just not sure. I don't know what it will do for his self esteem and all of that. I mean, GoodNites always has those commercials where the kids say that it helps them but if my kid was like "I don't want to wear them" I would never make him even if I had to wash his bedding every night.

What do to you think?

FullMetal
 

PrinceMatthew

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Adult Baby, Diaper Lover
I could write a message quite long about this.
But to keep it short;
I would, except he/she could make his/her choice.
and I wouldn't be part of it. If he/she did want to I would just be sure he/she didn't run out until he/she didn't wet the bed.
 

Trevor

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This is one of those things where there are too many variables to say for sure (personality, age, frequency, etc.) However, my default position would be that this is just another thing in life that needs to be dealt with. If you're bleeding, you get a bandage. If you have a different kind of frequent leak, you deal with that. I'm not fussed about the cleanup as much as I'd want to teach my child how to deal with problems. In this case, the age-appropriate diaper (although I sure wouldn't call it that) is the reasonable way to deal with the theoretically frequent and persistent problem.

I don't want a kid in diapers, but if he or she needed them, that would be my parental nudge. If there was resistance, it might take some days of gentle persuasion, and I wouldn't mind waiting. My job would be to make the child see this the right way and to be very glad when the wetting period passed. If it wasn't an ongoing problem, I'd just be of the opinion that "accidents happen", clean things up and move on.

Edit: mattress protection would be non-negotiable as far as I'm concerned. It wouldn't have to be a whole rubber/vinyl sheet; they make discreet pads that could go beneath the mattress pad. I think I'd have one of those for the kid before wetting ever came up. Easy to do laundry, but a mattress is pricey! If it was somehow an issue, I'd get one for every bed in the house.
 
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Grutzvalt

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Like Trevor said, it depends on age, frequency, and other variables. The urine would ruin the mattress, but it would be up to the child if they wanted mattress protection, but diapers would definitely be a must.
 

Jeremiah

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Diaper Lover
No one answer is correct.

This is one of those things where there are too many variables to say for sure (personality, age, frequency, etc.) However, my default position would be that this is just another thing in life that needs to be dealt with.
:whs0be:


There are multiple methods to deal with enuresis. The tendency of us to focus on the most drastic option (diapers) is not an appropriate response. Behavior modification, BW alarms, fluid restrictions before bed, and mattress protection should be a parent's first choice unless frequency dictate otherwise. Diapers may be mentioned in a neutral manner at the beginning of discussions on ways to handle it, but should not be the primary focus. Get the child involved in deciding how to handle the issue. This ensures that the solution will be most pleasant to the child. The primary goal is to care for the physical and emotional needs of the child, not get them back into diapers.
 

Takashi

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I would not at first but if the bedwetting was constant and showed no signs of stoping then I would suggest Gootnites/Pull-ups/Underjams to my kid and explain why I think it would be a good idea and then if they say they want to try then I let them try. It's possible that I might force him for one night and just say "just try this for one night and if it doesn't work you don't have to were them again." Yes that's forcing it alittle bit but sometimes you have to be forced to do something to relise the benifets.
 

avery

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those bedwetting alarms are supposed to be successful in most cases. if they didn't work i would think most kids over the age of 6 or 7 would prefer to change their bedding regularly rather than wear diapers, and the problem would probably stop sooner if they had to get up and deal with a wet bed as soon as it happened.

i probably wouldn't suggest goodnites, but if the kid expressed an interest in trying them i'd allow them to make that decision for themselves. wearing protection would allow the kid to get a decent night's sleep without worrying about the bedwetting problem, which sounds like a good thing in some ways but isn't such a good thing if you both really want the bedwetting to stop as soon as possible.
 
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secretdl26

Guest
As has been said before, I would focus on finding solutions that would work for the long run (such as alarms, limiting fluids, etc.) but I think that providing a way for a child to be able to sleep through the night without having to worry about the mess and stress that comes with wet sheets in the morning would make me want to provide something like Goodnites/Pull-Ups.

Not that I would force my child to wear Goodnites, but if they had the desire too and expressed their need to wear them. It wouldn't be about the easy way out, but the best solution for the situation.
 

Ranger

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If I had a kid and they asked for diapers, I would of course get them some. Of course, if this became a constant issue, I'd take them to the doctor.
 

Fire2box

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It depends on a case by case basis really. Like do they wet a lot or a little? Are they capable of washing their clothes etc.

Either way I wouldn't want to force them to wear diapers nor would I encourage them to like diapers. However there is a point where diapers could almost be necessary, wif you like them or not as sad as that is.
 

starshine

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Generally speaking yes, why? Because I'm not going to clean the damned mess. If they want to not wear them, then they can clean up after themselves. I don't really care.
 

Aki

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Little
Not automatically. Depends on how severe it is.
If they flood their mattress every night, then yeah.
If they need 'em, they're getting them.
 

Mesmerale

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Diaper Lover, Babyfur, Sissy
As a first response, I'd have to say no. Just because it's appealing to me doesn't mean it's appealing to my child. What makes me happy may traumatize him or her.

I would exhaust many of the other options before seriously mentioning diapers.

If my child asked me for some sort of diaper before I brought it up, I would immediately get them for my child until I was told to stop.

If my child is against wearing diapers then, depending on his or her age, I would:

1) Apply pressure until he or she caved and just did as I said

or, if the child is old enough to clean up after his/her self.

2) Respect his or her wishes on the condition that he or she will be responsible for cleaning up from that point on.
 

Jeremiah

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Good parenting is the key.

those bedwetting alarms are supposed to be successful in most cases. if they didn't work i would think most kids over the age of 6 or 7 would prefer to change their bedding regularly rather than wear diapers, and the problem would probably stop sooner if they had to get up and deal with a wet bed as soon as it happened.
While I have experience with a wet bed, I have no experience with the BW alarms. The assumptions made in your paragraph are not always true. The pain of cleaning a wet bed in the middle of the night is unlikely to affect the bedwetter in a positive way. Most likely, this will only stress out the child and prevent them from getting a good night's sleep. A stressed and tired bedwetter is more likely to wet the bed.

In my experience, the wet bed does little to change the problem. I have rarely woken up during the night with the urge to urinate. The wet bed did not disturb my sleep very often. When it did, I just rolled over and slept on a dry section of the bed because I was not awake enough for it to register that I should do something about the bed at that time. For about a year after the safety rail was removed from the bunk bed (age 4-5), I occasionally fell off the top bunk, made a loud thud, and muttered in pain. By the time that my parents checked on me, I was already sleeping soundly enough that they could put me back into bed without waking me. Therefore, cleanup waited until morning. In my case, something to soak up the mess and hold it until morning would have been the best choice. Either an absorbent pad over the sheet or something else absorbent would have worked better. I sleep soundly and very few things disturb my sleep.

Bedwetting is caused by the bladder being too full and the person not emptying it in an acceptable manner. Somehow, the person must either learn to wake up when the bladder is full, or keep the bladder from getting too full during the night. Only an attentive parent listening to the child will be able to determine the best course of action. The bedwetting alarm may be useful for light to average sleepers. My parents know that I sleep soundly and an alarm clock is not 100% effective. Therefore, the best course of action for me was to limit fluid intake after dinner and to ensure that my bladder was absolutely empty right before going to sleep in hopes of not allowing the bladder to become too full while I slept. This continues to be my nightly routine unless I want to wake up with a wet diaper.

The best method is good parenting skills combined with a willingness to seek out what is best for everyone involved.
 

BluTack

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I would say yes but only if it was quite frequency and if he/she asked for them... Or the girlfriend/wife wants me to.

If the kid don't want to wear them then fine by me. He/she will just have to clean up after themselfs.
 

FluffyFluffers

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I'd seriously if my kid wet the bed(Hell I'm likely not going to have a kid. I hate them.)

Wait till he is in his room and chunk a bag of whatever in there. Assuming that they are older then 10. Then talk with him later that day. Bring him/her into the doctor. If they're younger. I do not know what I would do. . Doctor visit!!! I'm not going to dehydrate my kid(It does do that.) or have one of those shitty alarms. I'd take the steps to let him sleep through the night and to help him/her get better if they can.
 

Sky

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Babyfur
When I was younger, I used to get so scared of monsters that live in the dark, that I was too scared to leave the safety of the bed to go to the toilet. Dad threatened me with putting me back in diapers but I turned them down even though it meant more telling offs. Oddly enough I did want them, but was too scared to admit it to him. I asked mum later that week, and she said she would talk it over with dad. Nothing became of it.

I think I would have to just show I’m not mad, but want to help them stay dry and comfy.

I don’t know what you guys think, but I know a lot of kids who are re-diapered, get attached to the bonding they get again when being changed. I guess it would be important to make sure they clean them selves up. I don’t know. I’m thinking aloud here.
 

dangermouse

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I think a poll like this will be clouded by personal desires.

I wouldn't want my own diaper desires/fetish/weirdness to influence them.
 

Mesmerale

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Wow, that's actually really horrible..

42 voters...

17 posters...
 
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kitty0230

Guest
I would make matress protection mandatory, and diapers an option

also, I would advocate for other methods, such as alarms, and such, take them to the doctor and do whatever else was in my power to do to them, I would never force MY desires on my kids.
 
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