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I think I found me a car WOOT

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Bryce

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So, went to look at a car my uncle saw today, nice as hell XD. $7,000 for a 2002 Saturn Coupe. Sadly, it's automatic, but it's got a sun roof and I think like 60k miles XD. Anyways, the guy said we could get it for $6200, so I think that's what we're going to do.

/excited
 
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awesome! Will this be your first? I personally would stay away from a sunroof, but that's just me. I've seen them leak alot when the car is older.

Anyway, good luck with the car!
 

Bryce

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Second one, my honda died yesterday :( Though, I did get a $1000 offer on the brand new transmission in it so that's good XD.
 

Raccoon

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My little beater Corolla I bought on spec; the most I had to lose, if it needed major work was the purchase price +inspection = $500. But for things $2000 and up I get them inspected BEFORE BUYING OR EVEN MAKING AN OFFER. For one thing, cars older than 10 years will need the insurance insepction anyway. For another, after I had decided an MPV was what I wanted, the first one I looked at ran beautifully, and was spotless but it turned out to need $2-3000 in work, not detectable by driving it or looking at it; the second one was near-perfect; both were listed for the same price. The cost of inspection prevents buying a lemon. It is also a bargaining chip for negotiating price.

If you have the skills of a mechanic to spot problems - or to fix them after - fine and dandy, especially if you intend the thing to be a project, and half the parts are going anyway to be replaced with stock or performance. I assume with any old car, I will replace plugs, wires, battery, belts, alternator (getting it rebuilt) and likely timing belt/chain, and likely exhaust. There are bargains out there but there are also tempting mistresses who turn into demanding wives when the papers are signed and sealed.
 
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Bryce

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My uncle has been a mechanic his whole life really and owns his own car shop. So, he's going to look at it and that'll say me the price if anything is screwed up on it. He stopped by and saw it and took a quick look over it and it looked fine. We're going back this afternoon to do a more thorough inspection of it, but everything seems to check out fine with it. So, yay, I might have a new car.

It sucks depending on others for rides, I don't know how I did it growing up -_-
 

TallestBabyEver

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My uncle has been a mechanic his whole life really and owns his own car shop. So, he's going to look at it and that'll say me the price if anything is screwed up on it. He stopped by and saw it and took a quick look over it and it looked fine. We're going back this afternoon to do a more thorough inspection of it, but everything seems to check out fine with it. So, yay, I might have a new car.

It sucks depending on others for rides, I don't know how I did it growing up -_-
I know that feeling, my car was done for almost a month after i fried the clutch. I had to depend on my roommate's truck until i could get the $$ to fix it. Luckily i go to tech school so i had all the tools needed to get the job done. It's a start though!
 

DHLA40

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Older Saturns are tuff little cars! The only major job I ever had to do to one, other than replacing a clutch, is to replace the rod bearings in a 99 SC2, and the timing chain, guides, and tensioners in an SL2. Even THAT stuff was easy.

They are great little cars. Just keep the oil changed. If it ever needs a water pump, replace the coolant with regular, garden variety green ethylene glycol antifreeze. Dex-cool causes sludging problems if air gets into the cooling system.
 

NEJay

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So, went to look at a car my uncle saw today, nice as hell XD. $7,000 for a 2002 Saturn Coupe. Sadly, it's automatic, but it's got a sun roof and I think like 60k miles XD. Anyways, the guy said we could get it for $6200, so I think that's what we're going to do.

/excited
$6,200 is an absolute, positive, rip off price for that car.

The car is worth about $4,500-5,000, in perfect condition, with that mileage. That said, it's a pretty bulletproof car.

Your uncle might be a cool guy, but he seems to be steering you in the wrong direction as far as cars are concerned.

He first said that your 1991 Accord has a carburetor, which it obviously, blatantly does not (really... for a computer literate person, it's like looking at a Mac, and calling it Windows XP), and now he's picked you out a car that is priced almost $2,000 over retail value. STOP LISTENING TO HIM!

Sorry to be harsh, but I HATE to see unknowing people get ripped off on cars. The Saturn SC is a great car, but that is way, way too much. I've purchased and sold almost 40 cars in my lifetime. I know what I'm talking about, and so does the poster above that said this car is priced too high. Do not screw yourself because "uncle carburetor" said it is a good deal.

My uncle has been a mechanic his whole life really and owns his own car shop.
Ask him if he is ASE certified. Any technician that doesn't know the difference between a carbureted and fuel injected engine could be lumped in with... My mom.
 

bobbyjeff

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Like ASE changes anything... I've seen "certified master mechs" get stumped over simple little electrical problems.

You should just cruise the papers and craigslist for a couple weeks. I promise you in this economy there are deals and steals to be had. I only paid $800 for a mislabled 1992 Toyota Corolla with 40,000 miles on it two years ago. All I have had to invest in was a set of tires and a few odds and ends that I replaced myself. Since it had a Geo badge on it, people are scared of them and think they are Korean or something. Now I have a 30mpg car with cold A/C that I have less than $1500 invested in totally. Just gotta keep your eyes open.
 

DHLA40

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ASE certifications give you upward mobility in a dealership, or franchise shop environment. When there's 5 to 25 other mechanics working in the same place, having your ASE's give you promotional credit, more seniority, and more pay. Some shop technical info services require at least one mechanic in the shop to have some ASE certification to qualify for their subscription.

I got mine in engine, undercar, brakes and suspension, and refrigerant handling/ air conditioning only because it was necessary to have so our shop could be included in the TechNet network. I'm the only mechanic there besides my boss, so "totem pole" politics wasn't a reason. TechNet required it in order for us to be in their network, and even paid for my testing.
 

Rheeer

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I loved the old stick shift I had, but honestly I really appreciate my new automatic. There's less to do and pay attention to. I can just drive without worrying about rpms, downshifting, where to put my drink when I have to do something...lol...

So I see you like manual transmissions, but...automatics are fun too.
 

Raccoon

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Manual vs standard: each has its advantages; I am not like the snotty Europeans who look down on autos. I do stuff with my right hand, and the low-powered/close-ratio standards I have had (old rwd Mazda GLC/323 wagon, current 85 Corolla, 76(?) Celica ST, Honda Civic wagon, Chevette Scooter) all required much shifting.

As to old cars, there are $500 bargains out there; but watch out too: paying big bucks is no guarantee of anything, I could regale you with tragic tales of woe about my F250 long box extended cab, and its electrics. Try steering that beast when it stalls. Or pushing it. (I like a car I can push... Have had to do so too many times, and always it seems while wearing runners, in deep snow or rain... there's boots in my trunk always now.) (Yay boots in the boot.)

On the other hand, blue book does not tell the whole story. Like when I bought the MPV I paid well over book value because it was in perfect condition (owned by a mechanic at a dealership.) Try to think in terms of amortised cost: total running cost over its lifetime: paying more up front to save repairs down the road is worth it, if you are not ready, willing, and able to fix things, and if you don't have access to a second vehicle for running around to fix the first one.
 
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I loved the old stick shift I had, but honestly I really appreciate my new automatic. There's less to do and pay attention to. I can just drive without worrying about rpms, downshifting, where to put my drink when I have to do something...lol...

So I see you like manual transmissions, but...automatics are fun too.
I was looking at the Nissan GT-R last night... Believe it or not, it seems to come with an automatic-only gearbox.

No option for a manual.

I, too, enjoyed driving cars with manual transmissions, but I would rather a phenomenal car with an automatic transmission than a mediocre car with a manual transmission.
 

Lil Snap

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I was looking at the Nissan GT-R last night... Believe it or not, it seems to come with an automatic-only gearbox.

No option for a manual.

I, too, enjoyed driving cars with manual transmissions, but I would rather a phenomenal car with an automatic transmission than a mediocre car with a manual transmission.
H3g3l, I think the GT-R is equipped with a dual clutch sequential manual that uses (as Jezza on Top Gear says) flappy paddles to change the gears. It does have an automatic mode, but the internals (and the lack of a torque converter) are patterned on a manual trans. It just shifts electrically, instead of a stick.

I, too, love to row a manual, especially in something that has some stones. A muncie 4-speed, a 12 bolt posi and about 4-500 HP is my "Idea of a Good Time" !
 

TallestBabyEver

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Like ASE changes anything... I've seen "certified master mechs" get stumped over simple little electrical problems.
.
ASE certification is more for impression purposes. I just got mine in brakes and steering and suspension. It shows employers that you know what to do when faced with a task and also impresses customers that the employers use ASE techs for work. Some employers require ASE certification in order to work at a shop. Some master certified techs are the best at their job and make a ton of money on flat rate. Others just know how to take a test but don't know how to turn a wrench. Electrical stuff is really harrowing, especially when trying to locate electrical problems. It may be easy when all the wires are in front of you but try looking for an electrical drain on a harness that looks like a spider web under the dash. It ain't easy.

h3g3l said:
I was looking at the Nissan GT-R last night... Believe it or not, it seems to come with an automatic-only gearbox.

No option for a manual.

I, too, enjoyed driving cars with manual transmissions, but I would rather a phenomenal car with an automatic transmission than a mediocre car with a manual transmission.
The GT-R is one hell-of-a-car partly because of it's transmission. It has an automatic mode for easy street driving but when the driver wants something spirited, a simple push of a button and you got yourself a killer sports car. The gearbox is automatic, but can be controlled electronically. This is the modern trend for most sports cars as of recent because auto trannies are much easier to control and can give better, more accurate response than a manual transmission where human error is more likely to occur. Would i roll one? No. I like a human challenge not something that is all wadded up in wires and electronics just to make a driver look better when he doesn't know crap. Stick shift FTW :cool:
 

bobbyjeff

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ASE certification is more for impression purposes. I just got mine in brakes and steering and suspension. It shows employers that you know what to do when faced with a task and also impresses customers that the employers use ASE techs for work. Some employers require ASE certification in order to work at a shop. Some master certified techs are the best at their job and make a ton of money on flat rate. Others just know how to take a test but don't know how to turn a wrench. Electrical stuff is really harrowing, especially when trying to locate electrical problems. It may be easy when all the wires are in front of you but try looking for an electrical drain on a harness that looks like a spider web under the dash. It ain't easy.
Oh I agree. Its no different than any other educational opportunity. There are some who use the program to better themselves and truly learn something, and then there are those who just do whatever it takes to get the piece of paper. I've just had too many of the paper warriors try to argue stuff that doesn't make the least shred of sense, so I'm a bit jaded.



The GT-R is one hell-of-a-car partly because of it's transmission. It has an automatic mode for easy street driving but when the driver wants something spirited, a simple push of a button and you got yourself a killer sports car. The gearbox is automatic, but can be controlled electronically. This is the modern trend for most sports cars as of recent because auto trannies are much easier to control and can give better, more accurate response than a manual transmission where human error is more likely to occur. Would i roll one? No. I like a human challenge not something that is all wadded up in wires and electronics just to make a driver look better when he doesn't know crap. Stick shift FTW :cool:
I love these cars, and I would have one in an instant if I ever thought I could afford to keep it. Sadly I think they are going to be like the old 3000GT VR4's. Everyone thought they were going to be the baddest Japanese super car around, then a few years later when it became obvious what kind of maintenance costs they incurred they fell out of favor. At least the GT-R lived up to its speed promises.

Its a rough economy out there, and once people start getting slammed with the regularly scheduled several thousand dollar maintenance intervals, these cars will start to lose a little bit of their luster.
 

Bryce

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We found one at a dealership. We're going Monday to sign the papers and all that fun stuff.

2006 Pontiac Vibe 50k miles for $9000. I know Ponitac is gone, but it's a Toyota motor and everything in it so we should be fine lol. And I love the car to XD.
 

WoXxY

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You can practically buy a new car for 9k these days.

Just throwing that out there.
 
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