How to Write an Advanced Diaper Review

Fruitkitty

ADISC Content Editor
Staff
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3,029
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Diaper Lover, Diaperfur
In 2013, we first launched our ADISC standardized diaper review format. This project aimed to solve the problem that it was difficult to actually compare diapers across different reviews and reviewers because there was very little objective data or consistency among them. We wanted it to be possible to build a library of reviews that became more than the sum of its parts as each new diaper reviewed could be compared meaningfully to other products.

I believe that we achieved that goal. Now, 5 years later, I'd like to make diaper reviews more robust.

Our original format was designed around the vision of reviews being written by many people, and was careful to minimize the number of diapers used (requiring only 3) and to only ask for simple tests that anyone could easily do at home in a modest amount of time. It also did not anticipate some of the innovations seen among ABDL diapers, such as the widespread adoption of printed packaging, and such things are not accounted for in the minimum standards of the format. While we have had many great reviews written by our members, as time has gone on I've undertaken an increasing proportion of them myself, have slowly added additional data, and now have access to more resources to acquire diapers for testing.

Going forward, I will use the more detailed format described below to upgrade existing and produce new reviews as "ADISC Advanced Diaper Reviews". This more detailed format will use a whole pack of diapers require higher standards of precision in the quantitative testing and add a new test to measure the diaper with doses of saline to measure a more accurate functional capacity. Reviews under the less stringent previous format will continue to be termed simply "ADISC Diaper Reviews".


How to Gather the Data for an Advanced Diaper Review


Materials Needed:
  • 1 full, unopened pack of the diaper being reviewed so that the. A minimum of 7 diapers from that pack will be needed for testing.
  • A tape measure with metric markings.
  • A device/method, such as a laboratory bottletop dispenser or metered pump capable of reliably measuring doses of 100mL and 160mL of water and saline from a reservoir of at least 3.5L.
  • A chair to sit in with a cloth seat, thin towel, or other indicator to help reliably identify small leaks.
  • A thick and heavy book, such as a textbook or phonebook
  • A few heavy objects for holding a diaper stretched out
  • A camera
  • A physical stopwatch, app, or software program to time the quantitative tests.
  • A kitchen scale capable of measuring at least 4kg and with precision of at least 1g increments.
  • bulk quantities of normal saline, OR ~100g table salt (NaCl) and a reasonably precise device, such as a large graduated cylinder, for measuring several liters of water.
  • (OPTIONAL but PREFERRED when applicable) For diapers from the same manufacturer where different prints are available on an otherwise identical diaper, include bags or single diapers to show and comment on all prints in side-by-side comparison pictures.

Time to Complete:

~1h to complete the quantitative rapid water increment test at least 3 times.
~2h to complete the saline dosing test at least 3 times.
~1h to take pictures
~One day spent wearing and using the diaper while going about ordinary daily activities


Procedure

1. Take pictures of the unopened pack of diapers. Take pictures of at least the front and a side, and take additional pictures of each side of the pack that is unique. If applicable, take side-by-side comparison pictures of different packs of diapers that differ only in print.

2. Stack 3 diapers, each folded twice as adult diapers are typically stored in a pack, and put the thick and heavy book on them. Measure and record the thickness and take a picture of the diapers stacked next to a tape measure.

3. Take one diaper, and take pictures of its front and back while still unfolded. If applicable, take side-by-side comparison pictures of diapers that differ only in print.

4. Unfold the back flap of the diaper and take a picture of one back wing to show the design of the tapes. Measure the width of the tapes.

5. Unfold the diaper and put heavy objects on each of the four wings to keep it stretched out. Measure length, width at the wings, and width of the center taking pictures of each measurement. Take pictures of the outstretched diaper on both sides, and if applicable, take individual outstretched pictures of each diaper that differs only in print.

6. Measure how much liquid the diaper can hold before leaking using the first of two tests:

Rapid Water Increment Test

This is a quicker and easier test included to maintain compatibility with earlier ADISC reviews and community expectations of resulting capacities.

a. Fill reservoir with tap water to at least 3.5L.
b. Measure the mass of the dry diaper to be tested.
c. Put on the diaper.
b. Meter out 100mL of water down the front of the diaper.
c. Sit down in a chair with a cloth seat, thin towel, or other indicator for leaks. Wait 30 seconds, stand up and check for leaks visually and by touch.
d. Repeat with 100 mL quantities of water until the diaper leaks. For a rough idea of what to expect, "premium", higher-capacity adult diapers have, typically but not always been shown to hold ~1.5-2L of liquid by this method in most of our reviews. High-end "super-premium" ABDL diapers now often reach as high as 2.5L. The highest measurement I have ever personally recorded as of this writing is 3.5L.
e. Take off the diaper. Measure its mass. The change in mass is the final measurement, and 1g of tap water = 1mL with sufficient precision for the purposes of reporting change in g directly as capacity in mL.

Perform at least 3 replicates of this test. Report the mean and standard deviation. If there is a large spread, consider performing additional replicates if able.

For at least one replicate, record qualitative data as you add increments and take the full diaper, refold it while swollen, and put it next to a dry diaper for comparison. Take a picture of the dry and wet diapers side-by-side and measure the height of the full diaper.


7. Measure how much liquid the diaper can hold before leaking using the second of two tests:

Saline Dosing Test

This is a more robust test that borrows ideas from industry standard procedure (NWSP 354.0.R1), a recent industry test designed to test diapers on a mannequin that repeatedly delivers doses of saline into the diaper.

a. Make 0.9% normal saline on a scale of 3+ liters by measuring 9g of table salt per liter on a piece of paper with a kitchen scale. Measure water to the corresponding volume in liters with a large graduated cylinder. Dissolve the salt fully into the water and fill the reservoir with the resulting saline.
b. Measure the mass of the dry diaper to be tested.
c. Put on the diaper.
b. Meter out 160mL of saline down the front of the diaper.
c. Sit down in a chair with a cloth seat, thin towel, or other indicator for leaks. Start a timer for 5 minutes. At 5 minutes, stand up and check for leaks visually and by touch.
d. Repeat with 160 mL quantities of saline until the diaper leaks. For a rough idea of what to expect, diapers will absorb substantially less saline than pure water and this measurement is typically 1/3 to 1/2 that of the rapid water increment test. I have recorded ABDL diapers at between 480-1600mL (3-10 increments).
e. Take off the diaper. Measure its mass. The change in mass is the final measurement, and 1g of 0.9 saline is ~0.995mL at room temperature. Multiply the mass by 0.995 to find the capacity in mL. Report the number both in mL and in number of 160mL increments, which correspond roughly to "half-floods" of while wearing diapers.

Perform at least 3 replicates of this test. Report the mean and standard deviation. If there is a large spread, consider performing additional replicates if able.

For at least one replicate, record qualitative data as you add increments and take the full diaper, refold it while swollen, and put it next to a dry diaper for comparison. Take a picture of the dry and wet diapers side-by-side and measure the height of the full diaper.


8. Put on a diaper and wear it over an ordinary day. Drink typical amounts of fluids, don't subject it to unusual physical activity, and just try to mimic a very average pattern of use. Take it off when it is full and begins to or is about to leak. At this point, note down:
a. how many times you used or flooded it.
b. about how long it lasted in hours.
c. if the tapes stayed stuck, if any came undone, if any shifted in position over time.
d. your impression of how crinkly or loud the diaper was.
e. your impression of the backsheet (the outer plastic or cloth-like cover) – did it feel thick, thin, soft, hard, anything else of note?
f. your overall impression of the fit, noting roughly your own waist and weight for context.
g. if the diaper failed in some way, or if it worked as intended.​

8. A few other things to note for when you write the review:
a. Does the diaper have any notable features? Elastic waistbands, double tapes, wetness indicators, baby prints, or anything else of note?
b. What size is the diaper and when did you purchase or otherwise receive it (month and year)?
c. What is the normal pricing per diaper?
d. Is there anything else that you feel really needs to be said about this diaper?​



Writing the Review


The diaper review format has 4 sections:
  1. A brief, untitled introductory section
  2. Appearance, Size, and Features
  3. Performance and Fit
  4. Price and Final Thoughts

Introductory Section

This should be a short introduction serving mostly to explain which diaper you are reviewing. It's important to be specific here. Include not just the name of the product, but which size is being reviewed and when and when it was purchased or otherwise received. Some diapers differ in appearance significantly across different sizes within the same product line. Some manufacturers of diapers update the design of their product line with some frequency, and it has frequently prove important to future readers to know exactly which version is being reviewed.


Appearance, Size, and Features

Think of this as the section where you describe as much about the diaper as can be said before you actually put it on.

This is where most of your pictures and measurements will be used. You need to describe in detail the look, feel, and sound of the diaper. Include data on its measured thickness while stacked and dimensions while spread out. Comment on the tape system. Talk about every notable feature that the diaper has.


Performance and Fit

Think of this as the section where you describe everything you learn about the diaper after you put it on. The first thing you should discuss is the result of both objective capacity tests, and include the pictures from after the test comparing the thickness of a dry diaper to that of the full one. Then you should comment on the observations you made during experience wearing the diaper over the course of a day. Explain how much it held under your use, if it fit well, if the tapes stuck in place or shifted over time, what the diaper sounded like, if it failed in any way, and anything else that you can think of.


Price and Final Thoughts

This is a brief, wrap-up section. First, give the pricing information of the diaper and where to purchase it at that price. Calculate the price per diaper at the case size, the typical benchmark figure for diaper pricing.

Comment on how the diaper fits in with its competition at that price point. Is it, like as most diapers will be, somewhere in the middle of the pack, or is it an unusually good or bad deal?

What, if anything, is notable about this diaper relative to other diapers on the market?

What is your bottom line impression of the diaper? All-in-all, is it a compelling product that everyone should strongly consider trying, is it a typical product that might be good for people who like the print or certain features and fit, or does it have flaws so significant that people should generally avoid buying it?
 

DippyDawg

We're #1, Sometimes #2!
Est. Contributor
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361
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Diaper Lover, Little, Incontinent
I suggest adding comments in the "Appearance, Size, and Features" section as to the backing type (cloth or plastic) and the fill type (fiber or SAP).
 
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