How do you pronounce “Wipe”?

huggiesthick

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First of all I’m not an English teacher nor am I any sort of expert with English grammar. Having gotten that out of the way now I have a few honest questions because I want to know if I am missing something here:

1. If someone is a “dip” shit then do you spell it dip or dipe?

2. If you eat chips with dip then do you spell it dip or dipe?

3. So why then do we spell dipe like dip?

We don’t spell wipe like wip.

Let’s discuss.
 
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Belarin

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huggiesthick said:
First of all I’m not an English teacher nor am I any sort of expert with English grammar. Having gotten that out of the way now I have a few honest questions because I want to know if I am missing something here:

1. If someone is a “dip” shit then do you spell it dip or dipe?

2. If you eat chips with dip then do you spell it dip or dipe?

3. So why then do we spell dipe like dip?

We don’t spell wipe like wip.

Let’s discuss.
The "i" in dip is pronounced like in "chip"

Whereas the "i" in wipe is pronounced like "eye"


In English when a word ends with a vowel then a consonant then an E, the vowel is pronouned like it's name. (i.e. A = ay, I = "eye", O = "oh", E = "ee", U = "you".)

Without the E at the end the vowel may be pronounced with its phonetic sound. (i.e. A = "ah, E = "eh", I = "in" (without the n), O = "hot" (without h or t), U = "oo".)

Therefore Dip I would be pronounced like in "chip" but Dipe would be pronounced more like the I - "Diaper"

English is a really wierd language comparitively as there can be exceptions to the rules and some letters get pronounced differently depending oncircumstance or what is around them and some phonetic sounds can be created in multiple ways.
 
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NappyCouple1980

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Belarin said:
The "i" in dip is pronounced like in "chip"

Whereas the "i" in wipe is pronounced like "eye"


In English when a word ends with a vowel then a consonant then an E, the vowel is pronouned like it's name. (i.e. A = ay, I = "eye", O = "oh", E = "ee", U = "you".)

Without the E at the end the vowel may be pronounced with its phonetic sound. (i.e. A = "ah, E = "eh", I = "in" (without the n), O = "hot" (without h or t), U = "oo".)

Therefore Dip I would be pronounced like in "chip" but Dipe would be pronounced more like the I - "Diaper"

English is a really wierd language comparitively as there can be exceptions to the rules and some letters get pronounced differently depending oncircumstance or what is around them and some phonetic sounds can be created in multiple ways.
This is exactly right, it’s called a split digraph
 
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BobbiSueEllen

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A rule of grammar is being solidly broken when people are calling diapers "dips" and it needs to stop as it is both incorrect and confusing...as I've passively punned upon over the months.

The correct spelling of a slang word for diaper is "dipe". Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.

As a Sesame Street short illustrated decades ago (when Sesame Street was actually educational), "What turns a man into a mane, or turns a can into a cane...just use a letter E!" Therefore, the slang word is "dipe". I'm tired of being increasingly repulsed by a can of bean dip now.

An exception: another accepted slang word for diaper is "diap", which preserves its original spelling and visual recognition. Although grammatical accuracy may be debated, it is nonetheless used by many actual parents to this day.

Just please, STOP calling them "dips". Seriously. This has been a BSE Production. Copyright MMXXII. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged. *starts warming up her paddle-spankin' arm* :devilish:
 
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oldpppants

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BobbiSueEllen said:
A rule of grammar is being solidly broken when people are calling diapers "dips" and it needs to stop as it is both incorrect and confusing...as I've passively punned upon over the months.

The correct spelling of a slang word for diaper is "dipe". Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.

As a Sesame Street short illustrated decades ago (when Sesame Street was actually educational), "What turns a man into a mane, or turns a can into a cane...just use a letter E!" Therefore, the slang word is "dipe". I'm tired of being increasingly repulsed by a can of bean dip now.

An exception: another accepted slang word for diaper is "diap", which preserves its original spelling and visual recognition. Although grammatical accuracy may be debated, it is nonetheless used by many actual parents to this day.

Just please, STOP calling them "dips". Seriously. This has been a BSE Production. Copyright MMXXII. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged. *starts warming up her paddle-spankin' arm* :devilish:
It's not a rule of grammar, which means how words are used, but phonics, which deals in letter sounds. In Spanish phonics works because letters always make the same sounds. In English we have 30-odd vowel sounds spelled with five letters. According, though, to the rules or "regular" phonics, Bobbi is right. It should be spelled "dipes" or "diaps," if you want to be true to the original spelling. "Dips" are what you use for your chips. I prefer diapies or di-dis, but that's my toddler personal preference.
 
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Kittyinpink

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BobbiSueEllen said:
A rule of grammar is being solidly broken when people are calling diapers "dips" and it needs to stop as it is both incorrect and confusing...as I've passively punned upon over the months.

The correct spelling of a slang word for diaper is "dipe". Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.

As a Sesame Street short illustrated decades ago (when Sesame Street was actually educational), "What turns a man into a mane, or turns a can into a cane...just use a letter E!" Therefore, the slang word is "dipe". I'm tired of being increasingly repulsed by a can of bean dip now.

An exception: another accepted slang word for diaper is "diap", which preserves its original spelling and visual recognition. Although grammatical accuracy may be debated, it is nonetheless used by many actual parents to this day.

Just please, STOP calling them "dips". Seriously. This has been a BSE Production. Copyright MMXXII. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged. *starts warming up her paddle-spankin' arm* :devilish:
Dips , Dips , Dips dips dips DIPS!!!
Ooopsy!!
Oh well , looks like I'm due a spanking !
(Where would you like me ?) 🤭🫣
 
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Kittyinpink

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huggiesthick said:
First of all I’m not an English teacher nor am I any sort of expert with English grammar. Having gotten that out of the way now I have a few honest questions because I want to know if I am missing something here:

1. If someone is a “dip” shit then do you spell it dip or dipe?

2. If you eat chips with dip then do you spell it dip or dipe?

3. So why then do we spell dipe like dip?

We don’t spell wipe like wip.

Let’s discuss.
I first discovered the word "dips" on a youtube channel, the woman doing that was Scottish. In different parts of the u.k, we make the English language almost impossible.. i think its a sort of weird game or perhaps something in the water ? 🤔..
Anyway at first I couldn't understand what she was talking about , then when I realised "dips" were diapers (in Scotland uk, where we actually use the term "nappy" ) I was at first a little annoyed..
But it grew on me and I found it cute 😍..
Then I noticed others use the term , and for me it's a cute and admittedly fun term to use , as I know it's annoying! 🤣🤣🤣..
But that's English for you .
Ken you ? (Scottish)
Does thou ? (Yorkshire)
Get me ? (American)
Dips (cute gibberish?)
Do you understand old chap? (Classic English)
Hope that helps ! 🤣..
I'm off soon , to go home , have some drinkies and probably put on a cute dip while I have a long session on the PlayStation..😊
 

BobaFettish

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BobbiSueEllen said:
A rule of grammar is being solidly broken when people are calling diapers "dips" and it needs to stop as it is both incorrect and confusing...as I've passively punned upon over the months.

The correct spelling of a slang word for diaper is "dipe". Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.

As a Sesame Street short illustrated decades ago (when Sesame Street was actually educational), "What turns a man into a mane, or turns a can into a cane...just use a letter E!" Therefore, the slang word is "dipe". I'm tired of being increasingly repulsed by a can of bean dip now.

An exception: another accepted slang word for diaper is "diap", which preserves its original spelling and visual recognition. Although grammatical accuracy may be debated, it is nonetheless used by many actual parents to this day.

Just please, STOP calling them "dips". Seriously. This has been a BSE Production. Copyright MMXXII. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged. *starts warming up her paddle-spankin' arm* :devilish:
For the longest I felt the same way. "Dip" just felt wrong.

Then I found the local Ageplay community and started going to munches, play parties, and such.

With munches in public places like restaurants, cafes, and such where discretion is important, "dips" works as a codeword. If someone is a table or two away, hearing the word "diaper" may catch your ear. "Dipe" might even get picked up unintentionally because it's an odd word. "Dip" is more of a regular word. If you walked pass a table and you overheard someone mention "dip", you may be thinking they are talking about dips. Everyone at the munch that hears "dip" knows you're talking about diapers.

I didn't 'get it' until I 'got it'.
 
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BobbiSueEllen

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Kittyinpink said:
Dips , Dips , Dips dips dips DIPS!!!
Ooopsy!!
Oh well , looks like I'm due a spanking !
(Where would you like me ?) 🤭🫣
*fires up the drill press, chucks up a 5/16" bit and starts drilling holes in the paddle*

Phonics of phonetics don't dictate spelling...merely sound. They are merely instructional and mnemonic aids. In printing, grammatical rules prevail over phonetics for clarity and disambiguation. In other words, "you can't mean what you say if you don't say what you mean". Grammatical rules are generally seen as an obstacle; so is a house, until a person seeks refuge in it from the elements. Grammatical rules are the same, in that they give the user security so that a person who uses them can be readily, universally understood, which is something everyone desires. It's not trivial at all, as some may opine; on the contrary, it is essential. And that's both my .0000011 Bitcoin...and fact. Thank ye most kindly! 🥳
 
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huggiesthick

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Kittyinpink said:
I first discovered the word "dips" on a youtube channel, the woman doing that was Scottish. In different parts of the u.k, we make the English language almost impossible.. i think its a sort of weird game or perhaps something in the water ? 🤔..
Anyway at first I couldn't understand what she was talking about , then when I realised "dips" were diapers (in Scotland uk, where we actually use the term "nappy" ) I was at first a little annoyed..
But it grew on me and I found it cute 😍..
Then I noticed others use the term , and for me it's a cute and admittedly fun term to use , as I know it's annoying! 🤣🤣🤣..
But that's English for you .
Ken you ? (Scottish)
Does thou ? (Yorkshire)
Get me ? (American)
Dips (cute gibberish?)
Do you understand old chap? (Classic English)
Hope that helps ! 🤣..
I'm off soon , to go home , have some drinkies and probably put on a cute dip while I have a long session on the PlayStation..😊
Rebel :)
 
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Kittyinpink

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BobaFettish said:
For the longest I felt the same way. "Dip" just felt wrong.

Then I found the local Ageplay community and started going to munches, play parties, and such.

With munches in public places like restaurants, cafes, and such where discretion is important, "dips" works as a codeword. If someone is a table or two away, hearing the word "diaper" may catch your ear. "Dipe" might even get picked up unintentionally because it's an odd word. "Dip" is more of a regular word. If you walked pass a table and you overheard someone mention "dip", you may be thinking they are talking about dips. Everyone at the munch that hears "dip" knows you're talking about diapers.

I didn't 'get it' until I 'got it'.
I keep my dips up the apple and pears , in the mother Hubbard. 😊😊😊
 

Belarin

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BobaFettish said:
For the longest I felt the same way. "Dip" just felt wrong.

Then I found the local Ageplay community and started going to munches, play parties, and such.

With munches in public places like restaurants, cafes, and such where discretion is important, "dips" works as a codeword. If someone is a table or two away, hearing the word "diaper" may catch your ear. "Dipe" might even get picked up unintentionally because it's an odd word. "Dip" is more of a regular word. If you walked pass a table and you overheard someone mention "dip", you may be thinking they are talking about dips. Everyone at the munch that hears "dip" knows you're talking about diapers.

I didn't 'get it' until I 'got it'.
Personally I'm with @BobbiSueEllen on this I don't like seeing "dips" used but I can definitely see your point there about it being less obvious in public.

Being English I tend to use the word nappy more IRL though diaper more online as there are more sites/people saying diaper online than nappy.
If I want to contract it though I personally like the word Dipey or Diapy however you would spell it, sounds more little and ties up nicely with nappy.
 
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Nowididit

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BobbiSueEllen said:
A rule of grammar is being solidly broken when people are calling diapers "dips" and it needs to stop as it is both incorrect and confusing...as I've passively punned upon over the months.

The correct spelling of a slang word for diaper is "dipe". Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.

As a Sesame Street short illustrated decades ago (when Sesame Street was actually educational), "What turns a man into a mane, or turns a can into a cane...just use a letter E!" Therefore, the slang word is "dipe". I'm tired of being increasingly repulsed by a can of bean dip now.

An exception: another accepted slang word for diaper is "diap", which preserves its original spelling and visual recognition. Although grammatical accuracy may be debated, it is nonetheless used by many actual parents to this day.

Just please, STOP calling them "dips". Seriously. This has been a BSE Production. Copyright MMXXII. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged. *starts warming up her paddle-spankin' arm* :devilish:
This is the new generations way of babytizing everything.
Just go on reddit and start looking at some subs and you'll see.
Bat= sky doggo
Bird= birb.......and so on and so on.....
I agree with your sentiment,
they should stop it. Some of it sounds so stupid and really gives away their immaturity. I'm like grow up already. It's not a "dip" it's a "diaper". It's been a diaper for how long now and suddenly in their state of their own immaturity they want to keep everything in a childish infantile like realm so as not to grow up themselves. Not only that, but they also get easily offended if we refuse to accept their immature ways. God forbid should we tell them to grow up and start acting like an adult.
 
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Kittyinpink

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BobbiSueEllen said:
*fires up the drill press, chucks up a 5/16" bit and starts drilling holes in the paddle*

Phonics of phonetics don't dictate spelling...merely sound. They are merely instructional and mnemonic aids. In printing, grammatical rules prevail over phonetics for clarity and disambiguation. In other words, "you can't mean what you say if you don't say what you mean". Grammatical rules are generally seen as an obstacle; so is a house, until a person seeks refuge in it from the elements. Grammatical rules are the same, in that they give the user security so that a person who uses them can be readily, universally understood, which is something everyone desires. It's not trivial at all, as some may opine; on the contrary, it is essential. And that's both my .0000011 Bitcoin...and fact. Thank ye most kindly! 🥳
Okay Auntie BobbisueEleen...
I'm sorry now 😔 😢

🤔 ... what are the holes for ??

NAILS !? 💅... eek ! 😬...
 

huggiesthick

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Apparently, I like stirring up shit.

Okay, so we agree that diap or dipe are pronounced like wipe and wipe only with a d instead of a w. Let's keep this simple so don't freak out on me with your technicalness.
  • Most of you know HOW to pronounce the term dipe, like above
  • Some of you are rebels and don't give a shit
  • And some of you like the code word dip, pronounced like dip, like chip dip, as to not out your-ABDL IC self in public
Seems fair.

I will use the terms diap and dipes

Cheers Mates,

PS I refer to my diaper bag (black 5.11 backpack) as delta bravo and in public I use the term diaper for diaper with my wife, but I talk softly to her.
 
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Kittyinpink

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Belarin said:
Personally I'm with @BobbiSueEllen on this I don't like seeing "dips" used but I can definitely see your point there about it being less obvious in public.

Being English I tend to use the word nappy more IRL though diaper more online as there are more sites/people saying diaper online than nappy.
If I want to contract it though I personally like the word Dipey or Diapy however you would spell it, sounds more little and ties up nicely with nappy.
I like "Diapy" 😊
 

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Kittyinpink said:
Okay Auntie BobbisueEleen...
I'm sorry now 😔 😢

🤔 ... what are the holes for ??

NAILS !? 💅... eek ! 😬...
the holes reduce air resistance so you can get a nice good swing.
 
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Kittyinpink

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Belarin said:
the holes reduce air resistance so you can get a nice good swing.
Oooh oooookaaaayyyy...
Looks like I might have a holey derriere... 😇
 

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Belarin said:
In English when a word ends with a vowel then a consonant then an E, the vowel is pronouned like it's name.
BobbiSueEllen said:
Notice the E at the end; as a grammatical rule, its presence at the end of a word makes its preceding vowel long, e.g. bike, pale, gene, gore, sure.
What makes English so difficult is not the rules, but the exceptions.

Magic E / split digraph is a simple phonetic rule to help young, native english speaking children to begin reading, but the rule is a train wreck for an adult learning the english language. It is not a grammatical rule, as there are too many important exceptions. For example: have, some, one, there, gone, love, sure, where, are, come, done, give, live, move, whose. Notice that "sure" is on the list of Magic E exceptions, contrary to what BobbiSueEllen stated. The u in "sure" and "puke" do not sound the same; one of them is an exception, and it's not puke.

I shake my head at dips, as I've always known that word as the non vulgar abbreviation for dipshits. So surrounding context will now be needed to determine if a poster is referring to diapers or dipshits.

I would ask why we all just can't get our shit together, but it's kind of pointless when we're all in dips... dipes... diaps... screw it; just don't call 'em briefs!
 

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HEHE, you all need to watch Loic Suberville (especially @BobbiSueEllen ), language shorts, they're from tiktok mostly but some also on youtube.

 
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