How did your daycare/creche/preschool/etc divide up the toddlers?

PurpleScorpion

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(When I say "your daycare" I mean both the ones you attended as a toddler and any ones you sent your kids to as a parent)

Were all the kids in one room regardless of undergarment status, diaper-wearers, potty trainers, and underpants graduates all together?

Were diapered kids kept separate from the Pull-Up wearers and underpants ones? Or were potty trainers kept in the same room as the diaper wearers, and the potty-trained kids kept separate? Or were all three in completely different rooms?
 
By ages so like under 1 year then 1-2 years 3-4yeads etc
Nappies aren’t a problem unless your hitting 5 years and starting school and unless there’s an underlying issue why there needed most schools in the uk won’t accept because they can’t safe guard the child or staff.
 
claire123 said:
By ages so like under 1 year then 1-2 years 3-4yeads etc
Nappies aren’t a problem unless your hitting 5 years and starting school and unless there’s an underlying issue why there needed most schools in the uk won’t accept because they can’t safe guard the child or staff.
Schools in the Uk now have to accept kids that are in nappies so everything is fair and even. (Though kids with extreme disabilities would go to specialists schools).
 
Emily-the-wolf said:
Schools in the Uk now have to accept kids that are in nappies so everything is fair and even. (Though kids with extreme disabilities would go to specialists schools).
Not at all schools if they can’t spare a member of staff to safeguard then legally they can’t accept them unless there parents come in to change them. You are right about the specialist schools though I just thought I’d mention “without underlying issues” before someone made an issue with it :)
 
claire123 said:
Not at all schools if they can’t spare a member of staff to safeguard then legally they can’t accept them unless there parents come in to change them. You are right about the specialist schools though I just thought I’d mention “without underlying issues” before someone made an issue with it :)
Fair enough! I just remember working at a school that had a few students in nappies from what I was told/understood they had to accept them. All makes sense to be honest!
 
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Ours was like school years so you had three classes:

Babies to 2
2-3
3-4

With the next “year” being Reception class at school.

There was no distinction between those children who were in nappies and those who were not.

I remember even in the final year at nursery there were children in my class who were in nappies.

I was only in nursery for the one year before school (age 3-4) so I know for a fact it wasn’t any earlier. I was day trained by that point and don’t remember having any accidents myself.

I have some vivid memories that I have recounted before in my origin thread.

I remember that the toilets were upstairs and we were taken up in groups of three, regardless of gender.

I remember one boy who was not in nappies wet himself nonchalantly every…single…day and always went home with his underpants in a yellow plastic bag.

Whatever he was doing- sitting, standing, running, playing, the wee would just start flowing and half the time he wouldn’t even seem to notice it.

By contrast, there were other children, both girls and boys, in my class who did wear nappies.

I remember one girl in particular always wore a nappy with a pink waistband but she literally never needed changing. I remember I was frequently part of her “group” when being taken to the toilet.

She always asked to go when she needed to go. I remember her being helped off with her (dry) nappy, being sat on the toilet and then having the same nappy put back on when she had finished.

She was never ever wet.

The teacher would undo one tape then she would step out of the nappy to use the toilet, then step back in and the one tape would be done up again.

I remember seeing (and smelling) others who weren’t so advanced, however.

Looking back I remember what must have been some incidents of classmates pooing their nappies. I remember one in particular who was holding on to a lower rung of a climbing frame with two hands while I was behind waiting to go on.

We were talking and I was asking if I could
go up. He was kind of grunting as he talked, holding on tightly, saying “in…a…minute!” . He was wearing dungarees which were quite popular in the late 80s and certainly didn’t lend themselves to easy toilet training.

I didn’t smell whether a poo was being had, but he seemed to be relieved quite quickly after that and ran off without going up
the climbing frame, so looking back I’m pretty sure he was pooing his nappy.

I also remember children who were taken to the toilet but who were found to have had wet their nappies at some earlier point
having things said to them like “oh dear, let’s get you a fresh one”.

The nappy would then be taken off, they would sit on the toilet to wee, then they would be laid down on the linoleum floor, which I recall was actually quite warm and spongy, and have a fresh nappy put on lying down.

This was before Pull-Ups, remember, so I imagine that whereas parents would now use a Pull-Up, parents then would opt for either nappies or pants when toilet training.
 
Toileting stages won't stop children moving from one room to another or with a different age group. Mainly it's just physical development of babies into toddler groups as it's not as safe having one crawl around while the rest can walk. After that it's just normally by age.
 
My brother works in daycare, he's with the 2 to 3 yrs old group, and they don't separate them, some are still in diapers, some are potty training, some are mostly trained except during naptime.
 
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