Has anybody here seen a psychiatrist/psychologist due to being ABDL?

PaddedInHaslet

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I’m just curious as to who here has ever been in therapy because of being an ABDL. I have a couple of questions.

1). Was it forced by somebody that found out or did you willingly go?

2). What was the psychiatrists / psychologists thoughts on being ABDL?
 

ARBBB2

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gone for 30+ years, most want me to stop, 1 was ok with it but she quit, i wont go anymore unless it someone that just helps to accept the baby in for my wife
 

footedpjs

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I saw a psychologist for 2-3 years or so, started for other things that I initiated. The AB side came up pretty quickly. They were not put off about but were concerned that I was using it to not deal with other things appropriately. She was right. In the end, and I'll paraphrase, it's not a bad coping mechanism but I need to be aware of using it too much to avoid actually dealing with problems in the right manner. The long answer was a lot longer. I was the first person she had ever seen with paraphilic infantilism. She had to do research on it.

I started seeing her for anger issues, mostly stemming from not adjusting to civilian life after getting out the Marine Corps.
 

Honeywell6180

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A psychologist will more than likely consider an ABDL as being on the autism spectrum. Much of this is because sensory and visual issues are involved.
 

Honeywell6180

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What do you base this on? Experience, research or is it just an assumption?

I base it on my own experiences with being autistic, and also the research I do on the condition. ASD is a whole body disorder, it is not a mental illness. The sympathetic nervous system can over-react to stimuli that it perceives as negative. This will cause the individual to place themselves in an environment where there is less reaction, to reduce stress. An ABDL will behave in a similar manner, so statistically they could unknowingly have the condition. And no, a psychologist is NOT going to tell his patient to stop wearing diapers. The doc will more than likely prescribe them, to improve overall functioning to better manage the condition.
 

NooNoo

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I’m just curious as to who here has ever been in therapy because of being an ABDL. I have a couple of questions.

1). Was it forced by somebody that found out or did you willingly go?

2). What was the psychiatrists / psychologists thoughts on being ABDL?

I’m going to see a therapist in part for this. Got to sit on the waiting list at the moment though.
 

Autiesaurus

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I've been seeing a therapist for a number of years now, but I'd never bring up my baby side to them, I'd be way too humiliated. Knowing what I do about my therapist though, she'd tell me that I'm not hurting anyone else and it brings me enjoyment, so why not do it?
 

tiny

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A psychologist will more than likely consider an ABDL as being on the autism spectrum. Much of this is because sensory and visual issues are involved.

Definitely not, in my opinion.

I had a great therapist -- I quickly felt like I could tell him everything about what "made me tick". So even though I wasn't seeing him for anything ABDL related, and didn't really have any problems with being ABDL, I told him everything. I'd been building up to telling him "a big secret" and working out how best to explain it, and when I eventually told him, he seemed really surprised. "Is that all?!!"

He warned me that I'd never be able to know for sure what (if anything) "caused" my interests. I said I understood, and wasn't particularly interested in the cause, as such. And he explained that it seemed to be perfectly understandable self-soothing behaviour. A way to relax and escape from stress/anxiety.

He used a few techniques derived from child-psychology to help me process my troubling thoughts/emotions, which was actually quite fun... and really helpful. (Funnily enough, he'd called me "young man" from our very first visit, even though I'm in my 40s, and not much younger than him.)

For a few sessions, I brought in a blanket and my teddy bear, and he talked through emotional issues (like the shame and embarrassment and fear) of being ABDL, and (even though I didn't think I had a problem with it), really helped me feel a lot less fear of being "found out" or being labelled a "freak". I mentioned a few ABDL events that were close to me, and said that I'd been aware of them for years and had thought about going, but... thought it might just be a bit weird and awkward. He looked me straight in the eyes and said, "I really think you should you go to one. I think you'd find it really helpful."

We only touched on this briefly, as being ABDL wasn't why I was seeing the therapist, and it wasn't a major issue for me. This was years ago. I no longer see a therapist, and I still haven't been to any ABDL events. Doh!
 

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Back in 1998, before AB/DL even existed, before anyone was even online talking about wearing diapers, I was seeing a therapist for depression. Well, embarrassing as it was, I got caught in the nude on the couch with a maxipad and a sex toy I was using to masturbate in the basement by my mom. She had come down to do laundry and I had gotten done playing and somehow had fallen asleep afterwards. She wrote a note to my therapist about it and all the times she had caught me playing in diapers. I thought my therapist was going to put me into some intense program where I was locked up and all. We didnt really talk about it but my therapist was actually really cool about it. He just saw it as some masturbation play and said that he thought it was a healthy thing and that a lot of people had things that "got them off". Remember, this was before the days of anyone being out of the closet regarding AB/DL. Thats what amazed me. I had never heard of anyone at all that was into diapers. I thought I had some freaky thing that was highly abnormal.
 

WanderingToddler

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I base it on my own experiences with being autistic, and also the research I do on the condition. ASD is a whole body disorder, it is not a mental illness. The sympathetic nervous system can over-react to stimuli that it perceives as negative. This will cause the individual to place themselves in an environment where there is less reaction, to reduce stress. An ABDL will behave in a similar manner, so statistically they could unknowingly have the condition. And no, a psychologist is NOT going to tell his patient to stop wearing diapers. The doc will more than likely prescribe them, to improve overall functioning to better manage the condition.
Thank you for responding. Personal experience is extremely valid and really helps support and explain your point.
 

hodori779

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My parents forced me to go from age 11-18, and put me on psychiatric drugs for the entirety of it. The last therapist I had was the only good one. She basically told me that once I turned 18, my parents couldn't legally make me go see a psychiatrist anymore.
 
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PaddedInHaslet

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My parents forced me to go from age 11-18, and put me on psychiatric drugs for the entirety of it. The last therapist I had was the only good one. She basically told me that once I turned 18, my parents couldn't legally make me go see a psychiatrist anymore.
They sent you due to your ABDL side?
 

DylanLewis

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I’m just curious as to who here has ever been in therapy because of being an ABDL. I have a couple of questions.

1). Was it forced by somebody that found out or did you willingly go?

2). What was the psychiatrists / psychologists thoughts on being ABDL?
PaddedinEastvale
Thank you for starting the thread on this very important topic. It is much needed and could be of great benefit.

I saw mental health professionals three times in my life linked to being ABDL. In each case I chose to go because of the emotional turmoil it caused me.

In my mid twenties I saw a clinical psychologist. I can't remember of lot of the details (it was over 30 years ago). He was kindly and was concerned to help me reduce the shame I felt. I don't recall that he said I should give it up. It helped with the shame at the time but I don't think he helped me to understand what being ABDL was, and why I was ABDL.

A few years later I had group therapy shortly after I started the relationship with my now wife of 30+ years. I thought of being ABDL just as a sexual fetish (wrong! at least for me) and wanted to give it up before I got married. The therapy conformed to my understanding that being ABDL was a fetish, provided emotional catharsis for my shame, and promoted abstinence as the solution. Of course that didn't work and a few years later I was just as ashamed and going through compulsive binge and purge cycles (which lasted for the next two decades).

In my forties after a mid life crisis where I contemplated suicide I also had group therapy. It was very positive. I chose not to disclose about being ABDL as I didn't trust that the therapists had sufficient understanding of it, and I wanted to focus on other issues. It would have been helpful to include being ABDL in the issues I addressed but it wasn't essential.

Finally in my mid fifties I saw a psychotherapist who made sense of things. She was well versed in childhood trauma, dissociation and attachment issues. I had chosen her because I suspected I had child alters - alternative personalities. Contrary to my expectation she didn't focus on the diapers and all that, but focused on the childhood trauma. I had been aware of these events but had separated my visual recall from their emotional significance. The events were in the category of the 'ordinary catastrophes' of childhood. Only when I got in touch with their emotional significance did I realize how traumatic the events had been, and that the trauma had affected me all my life.

The above leads me to reflect that the greatest benefit comes from seeing a psychotherapist who understands childhood trauma, dissociation and attachment issues. It is very obvious that ABDLs' diapers are symbolic of issues and unmet needs in early childhood. Those issues are sufficiently deep and powerful that the attraction to diapers lasts a lifetime. A mental health professional needs to know that they are doing before they jump in that deep end of the psychological pond.

Therapists who focus on being ABDL exclusively as a fetish can help people get past the shame that often blights their lives. That is very positive. They may not be equipped to help the ABDL address the deeper issues and help them understand why they are ABDL. I believe that's essential as per the saying - 'give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime'. The understanding the last psychotherapist provided gave me a foundation on which I have been able to further reflect and research on what being ABDL means for me.

Thanks again so much for starting the thread, and to all those who have posted. Regards.
 

rocketman

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I’m just curious as to who here has ever been in therapy because of being an ABDL. I have a couple of questions.

1). Was it forced by somebody that found out or did you willingly go?

2). What was the psychiatrists / psychologists thoughts on being ABDL?

I have. It was something my ex-wife wanted, but I did consent to it. So it was a combination of coercion and willingness. I don't regret it, but in the end it didn't end anything fir me.

I think he was interested in an intellectual level as much as anything. The University of Minnesota has a renowned group that studies human sexuality. I have seen his name pop up since on academic papers about ABDL. I wonder if i appear in them.
 

DylanLewis

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I base it on my own experiences with being autistic, and also the research I do on the condition. ASD is a whole body disorder, it is not a mental illness. The sympathetic nervous system can over-react to stimuli that it perceives as negative. This will cause the individual to place themselves in an environment where there is less reaction, to reduce stress. An ABDL will behave in a similar manner, so statistically they could unknowingly have the condition. And no, a psychologist is NOT going to tell his patient to stop wearing diapers. The doc will more than likely prescribe them, to improve overall functioning to better manage the condition.
Honeywell6180
Thank you for your very interesting posts. I am working on writing a differential diagnosis for being ABDL. That's where you match the symptoms of being ABDL with the various alternative conditions (autism, fetish, regression, dissociation etc) to find which condition best fits the symptoms.
I've seen on ADISC that there are a number of members on the autism spectrum who link that to being ABDL. I don't know much about the autism spectrum. I am very interested to understand the link with being ABDL.

Your post above suggests that being ABDL is a means of self-soothing for the issues with autism with stimuli input and processing. Are there other links between being autism and being ABDL? Do you have any thoughts on why only a small proportion of those on the autism spectrum are ABDL? Are there other overlapping causal factors?

Were you diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum in adulthood?

Best regards.
 

egor

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I have been in therapy since June 2000. I did not bring it up until January 2013 (the day after I joined ADISC).

IT was more based on the conflict of Incontinences issues and Diaper Discipline I got as a kid, then the ABDL.

My therapist was very supportive and we looked at ways to set boundaries and make a coping mechanism out of the situation.
 

Honeywell6180

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Honeywell6180
Thank you for your very interesting posts. I am working on writing a differential diagnosis for being ABDL. That's where you match the symptoms of being ABDL with the various alternative conditions (autism, fetish, regression, dissociation etc) to find which condition best fits the symptoms.
I've seen on ADISC that there are a number of members on the autism spectrum who link that to being ABDL. I don't know much about the autism spectrum. I am very interested to understand the link with being ABDL.

Your post above suggests that being ABDL is a means of self-soothing for the issues with autism with stimuli input and processing. Are there other links between being autism and being ABDL? Do you have any thoughts on why only a small proportion of those on the autism spectrum are ABDL? Are there other overlapping causal factors?

Were you diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum in adulthood?

Best regards.

I was diagnosed with autism at 40 years of age. I don't consider myself to be an ABDL. But rather, I have certain specific sensory issues that I picked up on very early in my childhood. I never found a female to be very attractive, and I also didn't care to be close to others. I was never an affectionate kid, and I also knew that girls never took an interest in me in the first place. And for that, I had to meet my own personal needs independently. That was 35 years before I was actually diagnosed. I wouldn't even call it "self soothing". But rather, a need for certain textures, scents, and pressures to aid in better functioning overall.

Before I was diagnosed, I had to get a history from former school instructors, going back to elementary school. To this very day, most of my instructors are still friends with one who I visit fairly often. After that, I went through several questionnaires and evaluations, with the conclusion that I am indeed on the spectrum. All behavior patterns were carefully considered according to others with the diagnosis, and I also had several forensic psychiatric evaluations to finalize the determination.

I have a medical prescription for the diapers due to the ASD being an official proof of sufficient need. Although Medicaid does not pay for the diapers I need, and that I have to buy them with my own money, I get an increase on other forms of assistannce to make it less difficult for me to cover my costs. Prior to moving to my current location from another state, Human Services would even go as far as buying my diapers through other accounts besides Medicaid. But, I of course, don't have that luxury now.
 

Autiesaurus

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I'm autistic (diagnosed at 21) and never thought of it as being connected to my ABDL side. It might be related to my difficulty with social skills and general lack of social and emotional maturity, and maybe the thumbsucking that I've engaged in my entire life is a sensory thing (I have a lot of sensory issues) but I don't think I can definitively say that I'm ABDL because of my autism.
 
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