for those with autism

do you have AUTISM

  • yes (dignosed by a doctor)

    Votes: 18 50.0%
  • yes (self diagnosed)

    Votes: 9 25.0%
  • maybe

    Votes: 6 16.7%
  • no

    Votes: 3 8.3%

  • Total voters
    36

eliblox2009

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I just wanna say some things about autism.

AUTISM is NOT a disability
it a different ability

also
AUTISM
is one word
trying to
describe
itself in millions
of stories

and

AUTISM: WHERE THE "RANDOMNESS OF LIFE" COLLIDES ABD CLASHES WITH AN INDIVIDUAL'S NEED FOR SAMENESS

-ELIEEN MILLER

(note the first 2 are my own thoughts or things I heard but the last is from google)
 
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AceThePurpleFox

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I disagree with this. Autism is very much a disability for some people. There are things I can't do due to my autistic traits.

You don't have to consider it as such, but there are people who do (myself included) and both groups are valid.
 
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eliblox2009

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AceThePurpleFox said:
Autism is very much a disability for some people
i not saying it is not, i am just saying that look at the bright side of things🙃
 
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foxkits

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When nature want to change things.
Some things change yes the brain change maybe for the better.
You may be thinking on a higher level. Not a lower one . Nature is always striving for perfection
We are not to always to stay the same way it takes all kinds to make a world.
 
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SoggyApril

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AceThePurpleFox said:
I disagree with this. Autism is very much a disability for some people. There are things I can't do due to my autistic traits.

You don't have to consider it as such, but there are people who do (myself included) and both groups are valid.
I take a similar approach, except it isn't Autism that's the disability, it's how society is structured around allistic folk and doesn't accommodate other neurotypes that causes the disability.
 
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EagleBoy

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I know someone who has autism and he works at Home Depot. He can't do some of the stuff the rest of can do but he does have a full time job at Home Depot
 
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BobbiSueEllen

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I have autism. It was undiagnosed until just before Christmas of 2018. My oldest granddaughter, almost 13, has it as well...and is having considerable difficulty with despite her various abilities. Oddly enough, her childhood is largely mirroring mine; she might have a breakthrough like I did. Then my #3 granddaughter was diagnosed with a touch of autism...she's intelligent, active, manages well enough. #2 granddaughter & grandson tested negative for it. We have a wildly varied patchwork of personalities...but I love 'em all. And they love me. They, their parents and I are a family. It's amazing how we interact.

I often wish I'd been diagnosed earlier...but that could've changed everything I have--and lost--now. This is juuust fiiine. 🥳
 
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chiaochai

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SoggyApril said:
I take a similar approach, except it isn't Autism that's the disability, it's how society is structured around allistic folk and doesn't accommodate other neurotypes that causes the disability.
for me, autism is the disability. sure, folks could really do a lot better when talking to autistic people but even in a perfect world i would still be disabled by my autism (amongst other things)

both my partner and i are autistic and it makes things a lot easier and is probably one of the reasons we are together. we always tell each other our expectations and feelings straight forward. it is really nice to have good communication with the person i love, as it can be really frustrating with the rest of the world.

the overlap between autism and ABDL is interesting, i wonder if its because a lot of us are incontinent/hate switching tasks to go the bathroom or if its more because of our developmental delays.
 
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todderhr

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I’m pretty sure I’m have ASD. My daughter was diagnosed along with my brother and his two sons. I’m not sure if I should talk to a doctor about it or not.
 
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foxkits

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I like patterns things staying the same. Getting things out of my head onto paper or writing is very hard .
But remember tv shows
 
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foxkits

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They never had what they do now
 
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KyleXY

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I treat myself as having autism and I am not autistic.
 
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Edgewater

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Autism is common within my extended family on my fathers side and it is generational as well, with it skipping a generation or two. Point being, I have now past family members who were and others who did not. It missed my children and our grandchildren, but not my brother whom both of his kids have and elected not to have children as part of their marriages.
As noted by others the variations between how deeply one is effected also varies widely. I find that I am concern how those with Autism are treated as I have seen the effects caused by stupid uncaring people.
Cheers!
 
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KyleXY

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I have learned that your brain obeys your commands. YOU are not what you think.
 
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BobbiSueEllen

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KyleXY said:
I have learned that your brain obeys your commands. YOU are not what you think.
Our brains are like computers: there's the part we cannot control, like ROM (Read-Only Memory, a.k.a. the Autonomic Nervous System) and the part we can, like PROM (Programmable Read-Only Memory, a.k.a. the Somatic Nervous System).

Lots of people say you're entirely within your own control...but it just ain't entirely so. It takes time to overcome things we call habits...and not all habits are surmountable. That falls within the Sympathetic Nervous System (where most of our reflexes, such as "Fight-or-Flight" reflex, exist).

We are all like computers...but with superior & inferior features. Conscience & humanity the things a PC can never be programmed for.

Just my .00000095 Bitcoin. This has been a BSE PSA. QED PDQ. YOYO. TCB. P&CG. EIEIO. WWDLRD. YMMV. 😉
 
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AJFan2020

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I have noticed that every case of autism is unique.

My sister was diagnosed by a neurologist when I was around nine years old. I was only diagnosed around ten-and-a-half years later by a different neurologist even though my sister is four years older than I am and my autism actually has more of an effect on my socIal skills including understanding figures of speech (irony and sarcasm, mostly) and body language. Now, from reading books I can analyze body language at least fairly well, but I miss most of the actual conversation in the process, and I still struggle with eye contact. Also, I said my first “four-letter-word” at age four, and I only learned about the concept of lying sometime after my seventh birthday when my sister broke the cuckoo clock in the front hallway of my parents’ house and lied about it and my parents had to explain to me why she said that I broke it when I knew that I was in a different room at the time.

My sister (on the other hand) started reading books at age two (I was only reading individual words (and maybe some short phrases)) by age four. She said her first “four-letter-words” (and sentences containing them) by age two. My sister and I both both said our first words and started walking (but not necessarily well) around age one. My sister made her first friends by the end of Elementary School, but I was in College by the time my social skills reached that level. My sister and I were both late when it came to toilet training, but I took me two to three years longer. My sister’s toilet training delays were assumed to be medical even before she was diagnosed as being on the spectrum, but my toilet training delays were attributed to stubbornness. My sister’s symptoms fit the stereotypical idea of autism better at the time than mine did. For example, my sister can remember the day of the week of most events in her life from about age eight or nine on. Also, she could tell you the day of the week of any date for about eighty to a hundred years in either direction (which I cannot do). On the other hand, my skills seem to be limited to perfect pitch, remembering a piece of music after hearing it no more than two or three times (which my sister cannot do), and being able to remember a movie or TV Show episode after between one and three viewings (Including the characters’ voices (which my sister cannot do)).

My diagnosis probably took longer than my sister’s (even though my condition has more of an effect on my social skills and my ability to function) because back in the 1980s it didn’t fit the stereotype as well. For example, I had frequent sensory meltdowns (which my mother simply interpreted as temper tantrums) when I was in Marshalls (which back in the 1980s and 1990s had a very loud air conditioning/ventilation system that was running most of the year and that I could not tune out). I also had sensory meltdowns in the grocery store that my mother shopped in because I could not tune out the noise made by the refrigerators and freezers. I also had (and still have) some repetitive hand movements that today (in my late 40s) might worsen my existing issues with trigger finger/trigger thumb (especially on the left side). These hand movements were not yet recognized as autism symptoms back in 1984, but they are now. Also, if you watch the Arthur episode “When Carl Met George” I did virtually all of the things that he did. I was even interested in trains and then rocket ships just like he is. Back in the 1980s even an obvious case like Carl on Arthur likely would have been missed because the criteria were much more narrow back then.

I know two other people (now in the early years of Elementary School) who are confirmed to be on the spectrum but their symptoms are very different from my sister’s and mine because they had speech delays (they only started talking around age three) and they also started walking after their third birthdays. I could go into more detail, but this post is probably long enough already.

In short, as I mentioned above no two cases of autism are the same (Many are not even close to the same).
 
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Elmo

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I was diagnosed by a doctor with ASD when I was (actually) little. I just ignore it. Not in a "pretend it's not there" way, but a more "I have autism, but it doesn't define me" way. Out of sight, out of mind.
 
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SmolYui

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autism for me (combined with other things probably) is a huge disability, it limits me so much, like too much it a big reason why i just a little kitty hehe~
 
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foxkits

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I'm very smart in some ways.
Was hard to potty train still had wetting accidents at 12 years old.
Physical I think. Though parents thought I was lazy. even my dad had the problem when he was little.
Could not keep focused on things very long. Never completed somethings into the next lol.
 
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BobbiSueEllen

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SmolYui said:
autism for me (combined with other things probably) is a huge disability, it limits me so much, like too much it a big reason why i just a little kitty hehe~
Understandable. Autism can impede with social interaction in varying ways, be it at family get-togethers, school, a job or at other places like concerts, stadiums...even shopping. Not always, but it can. Some people with autism have lighter triggers for getting set off...but don't let anyone devalue you for that. You are who you are. But don't short-sell yourself, neither...it's all a part of the ongoing, lifelong voyage of self-discovery. Learn, grow, experience! 🤭🤗

My tolerance level as far as autism goes is a wild-card thing...I can take a lot one day and barely anything at all the next day. I had a career, a family, the whole sha-bang one day, was doing well enough...then within a month, I lost it all. Disability. Then my undiagnosed autism started this leapfrog contest with it. What a wild ride, huh? O well, someone had to win that lottery! Just wish it was cash but I had my two paydays...fair 'nuff.

Just know we love ya, no matter what. 🥳🥰

foxkits said:
I'm very smart in some ways.
Was hard to potty train still had wetting accidents at 12 years old.
Physical I think. Though parents thought I was lazy. even my dad had the problem when he was little.
Could not keep focused on things very long. Never completed somethings into the next lol.
Oh, gads, know that one! Never could multitask well...that and I used to have others I knew growing up say "I don't get it. How are you so smart in many ways and [R-word]ed in the rest?" What a generation we were, huh? That's just the bag Autism hands us.
 
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