Fire inspection and my huge pile of incontinence nappies in bedroom?

bobbilly

Est. Contributor
Messages
1,477
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
I live in a shared group home for people with disabilities, we have a fire inspection on Thursday so means fire inspector plus landlord and group home manager will be inspecting my bedroom. I have 30 packets of incontinence nappies in my room with nowhere to hide them. Mainly all Tena slip active fits (thankfully non-AB) Now this fire person will be looking for fire risks in my bedroom so probably looking around a bit.

They will defiantly see them. I'm worried they'll think having 30 packets of Tena slip will be excessive and why do I have so many?

its literary 6 deep and 6 across packets and and nearly 5 ft hight in middle of my room.

I'm a bit worried.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
You're in a group home
They have seen it all
They won't say anything at all
might be bit embarrassing
do you have to be there during the inspection?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater and Floodingpants
SparkyDog said:
You're in a group home
They have seen it all
They won't say anything at all
might be bit embarrassing
do you have to be there during the inspection?
I'm making sure I'm out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater and SparkyDog
If you're living in a shared group home for people with disabilities why would anyone even bat an eyebrow at it? (I can understand not wanting to be standing there while they're looking around there though.)
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
bobbilly said:
I'm making sure I'm out.
There ya go
no one will say anything unless they block something vital.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
Could you spread them out at the back of a closet and throw some coats over them? Then hide the rest under the bed, assuming it has a hollow space beneath it. Could probably fit a single pack in each of a bedside draw.

You could also get a wood chest to put some of them in, like an otterman[sp] with cushion on the top so it looks like a place to sit at the foot of the bed.

Are there hollow spaces under the sofas maybe? Hollow spaces underneath wardrobes, chests of draws, the TV stand / media cabinets.

You could perhaps wrap some up in black bin bags and put them at the back of the cabinets in the kitchen, unlikely they would ask what they are but if they did you could just say dried food stuffs like pasta and rice.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
bobbilly said:
I live in a shared group home for people with disabilities, we have a fire inspection on Thursday so means fire inspector plus landlord and group home manager will be inspecting my bedroom. I have 30 packets of incontinence nappies in my room with nowhere to hide them. Mainly all Tena slip active fits (thankfully non-AB) Now this fire person will be looking for fire risks in my bedroom so probably looking around a bit.

They will defiantly see them. I'm worried they'll think having 30 packets of Tena slip will be excessive and why do I have so many?

its literary 6 deep and 6 across packets and and nearly 5 ft hight in middle of my room.

I'm a bit worried.
They can't poke about too much. You are entitled to privacy. They are mostly concerned with fire exits being block and maybe overloaded electrical sockets etc.
 
Very true, exits, fire hazards, and working equipment is what they are looking for. If you have the room, you may try putting them in a couple of different places so that it’s not so much in one place. Share a picture of Mt. Tena. I would love to see this. I have a few cases myself of different brands but not 30 packs of awesome diaper goodness.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
Mt. Tena!!
I like it!!
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: JensBabyGirl, star, BunnyPrincess and 3 others
I don’t want to sound too alarmist, but I don’t think embarrassment will be an issue, but a greater concern is that such a concentration of a plastic-based product with plastic packaging in one relatively small space may be deemed to constitute a potential fire hazard.

These comments have been made to me when I have stored large amounts of materials for my graphic design business before the process became digital and larger amounts of paper/fibre boards/plasticised materials were no longer required.
 
  • Like
Reactions: star and Edgewater
Best is to spread all thise packets in several locations in room. Under bed,in closet.
If packets are far away ( 1 m )from sockets and heat source, ( lamps etc) then no worries.
Fire inspection will not bother with rest of your stuff.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: Edgewater, DLmikey and LittleBoyCuddles
wearforsafety said:
Best is to spread all thise packets in several locations in room. Under bed,in closet.
If packets are far away ( 1 m )from sockets and heat source, ( lamps etc) then no worries.
Fire inspection will not bother with rest of your stuff.
I think this would definitely be a good plan. 😊
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
DLmikey said:
I don’t want to sound too alarmist, but I don’t think embarrassment will be an issue, but a greater concern is that such a concentration of a plastic-based product with plastic packaging in one relatively small space may be deemed to constitute a potential fire hazard.

These comments have been made to me when I have stored large amounts of materials for my graphic design business before the process became digital and larger amounts of paper/fibre boards/plasticised materials were no longer required.
If they're in a closet with clothes it doesn't matter, most modern clothes are polyester or a polyester blend and are super flammable anyway, some packs of nappies won't increase the fire potential of a closet significantly enough to raise an issue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DLmikey, Edgewater and LittleBoyCuddles
They are looking for fire hazards. extension cords under rugs, blocked exits, items that will or could disrupt an evacuation, working detectors ect.. not a few packages of diapers. They are not going thru your personal items. Just clean your room of clutter, make it easy for them to check outlets and such and go on with life. The folks on here talking about diapers and fire load are way off base.. This from a fire prevention inspector here in the states
 
  • Like
Reactions: OnePiece and Edgewater
I'm going to echo that I feel like the inspector(s) won't care. The presence of some diapers in your room won't be cause for concern unless you carelessly place them next to/on top of a heat source that could ignite. These people are going to be used to seeing many different things, and they won't judge you for something as innocent as packs of nappies.

They are going to be so much more concerned with things like smoke detectors that don't work, overloaded electrical sockets, blocked emergency exits, fire extinguishers that need inspection/replacing, and other major fire related things.

And if you are worried about the amount you have.. don't be! Some people, myself included, are on fixed monthly incomes with only ONE monthly payment, so we are basically left to get everything we need for an entire month or more at one time.

Hope this response is helpful for you!
 
  • Like
Reactions: bobbilly, LittleBoyCuddles, Joe100000 and 1 other person
You have received very excellent information regarding normal /common Fire Safety Inspections.

They will be checking:
- Smoke Detectors and whether they are operational and their age.
- Overloaded electrical outlets.
- Electrical cords and overall all length (addition cords added).
- Light fixtures without bulbs.
- The area in front and next to electrical outlets.
- Assure that individuals entering your area can easy move in and back-out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bobbilly, BunnyPrincess, LittleBoyCuddles and 1 other person
Joe100000 said:
If they're in a closet with clothes it doesn't matter, most modern clothes are polyester or a polyester blend and are super flammable anyway, some packs of nappies won't increase the fire potential of a closet significantly enough to raise an issue.
Yes, I agree - I think distributing them into several locations, especially in cupboards with clothes etc is definitely the way forward - far better than presenting the inspectors with a five foot mountain of nappies! 👍
 
Order a couple opaque plastic storage tubs sized to fit a whole number of packs without wasted space. Cube them up and drape a couple loose items on the top.

Spread them around a bit. Any under bed storage?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
*throws match onto pile of diapers*

"What?! I thought you were here to inspect the fire!"

bobbilly said:
middle of my room.
That's probably the only thing to actually (maybe) worry about. If they might reasonably be considered "in the way," you'll probably be asked to move them. I can't imagine you'll get any grief about having them though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Edgewater
DLmikey said:
I don’t want to sound too alarmist, but I don’t think embarrassment will be an issue, but a greater concern is that such a concentration of a plastic-based product with plastic packaging in one relatively small space may be deemed to constitute a potential fire hazard.

These comments have been made to me when I have stored large amounts of materials for my graphic design business before the process became digital and larger amounts of paper/fibre boards/plasticised materials were no longer required.
I suppose this could work in their favour. Maybe the people at the home would be kind and offer storage space for the tenacious Mt. Tena
 
Last edited:
  • Like
  • Love
Reactions: bobbilly, DLmikey and Edgewater
Back
Top