Expressions from where you're at!

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Point

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Well, you used the only one I can think of - ending the sentence with 'at' when you've already used a question word!

"Where're you going to be at?" as opposed to "Where're you going to be?"
 

care_a_lot

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A few Australianisms

"its at the back of burke" possibly a melbourne thing meaning burke street which is a very busy street and is used to talk about a busy area.

"its out in whoop whoop" - Very far away

you've got two hopes of doing that - you can't do that

this has been shortened from "you've got two hopes of doing that buckleys and none"

Buckley was a guy who came out to australia as a convict and escaped into the forest and was believed to have been slaughtered by the aboriginals but they have never found a body.
 
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One particular thing about Australian-English is that we heavily use Litotes. :educate:

Basically, we give our response as the opposite of the negative of what we want to communicate. Confused much? :confused:

When asked "How are you going?", expect a response like, "Not bad".

"How far away is <place>?" --> "Not far"

"I got this question right!" --> "Yup, you're not wrong!"
 

Tigger

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Here fanny means vagina LOL. Root is a good one, means have sex with (like the same as the f word but not [as] offensive). Cock here is an offensive word for penis (like the rest of the world). The dinner and tea thing applies here as well, I think. It could just be that my family has always called dinner tea and lunch dinner.
One thing we say in my town here, is really backward. When we are reffering to other parts of town people generally say "down the north" or "out the south" lol. People when asking where something is will say "where's that to?" rather than saying "where is that". It usually confuses people from out of town. There are also alot of slang terms that are used here in our town only. Not many come to mind right now though, I'll post a few later on when I think of a few.

oh!, I just though f one. It's not really an expression or slang thing, but in the middle of town here there is a public toilets building and it's round. Lots of locals call it "the rotissary pissery" LMAO
 

Pramrider

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Lukie, another expression an Australian friend of mine uses regularly is "spot on", which means what you said is "exactly right".

~Pramrider
 
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Yumi

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I come from an area with a lot of Asian influence, so a lot of the stuff I'd say wouldn't fit my country haha. Hmmm...
 
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Lukie, another expression an Australian friend of mine uses regularly is "spot on", which means what you said is "exactly right".

~Pramrider
Spot on!

Heh... it's so hard to hard list these things down because you are just so used to saying and hearing them that they become natural.

"She'll be right" is an expression I use a little bit. It basically means, "Everything will be ok" or "Don't worry about it". The "she" doesn't refer to anyone at all.

"Esky" is an insulated carry-container used for storing drinks (or other items that should/need to be chilled) when you are going out for the day. Go to any beach, sporting match, BBQ or social occasion and you are bound to see an esky. This goes hand-in-hand with the phrase "cracking open a cold one", which means to have a beer (the cracking sound made by the beer can as it's being opened).

I think this one may have been mentioned before, but if you ever hear anyone talk about a "Ute", they are referring to a particular style of car we have here. A ute has a big storage area on the back and is most often used by "tradies" (Another term we have here. It refers to people who work a trade job - like a plumber, builder, electrician, carpenter, etc...). But you can get models that are for private used.
 

Charlie

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One particular thing about Australian-English is that we heavily use Litotes. :educate:

Basically, we give our response as the opposite of the negative of what we want to communicate. Confused much? :confused:

When asked "How are you going?", expect a response like, "Not bad".

"How far away is <place>?" --> "Not far"

"I got this question right!" --> "Yup, you're not wrong!"
So if a woman asked you how she looked in a certain dress, you'd say something like "Not fat"?

Because if you said that here you'd get a stiletto in the face! It has to be "Thin!". :p
 
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You must end every sentence with "fool" or call everyone "fool" and just "fool" is the pronoun where I am I guess >_>

And then there's alot of Spangalish here =D Oh yesh, mixing Spanish words in with English sentences even though the english is a Mexican accent! Oh Yesh that's the thing here.

"That's what she said" is also a part here in my school

If you say F**k someone will say "me" or some other thing to end the sentence, or it will continue on through 4-5 people.

And then the, "Eeeee" instead of, "Oooh"

Though I do none of these =p
 
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So if a woman asked you how she looked in a certain dress, you'd say something like "Not fat"?

Because if you said that here you'd get a stiletto in the face! It has to be "Thin!". :p
Hah! Yes, I've gotten away with it before... but only a handful of times.

Usually the response to "Not fat" is a highly sarcastic dose of "Oh thanks for that... wanker!" :p
 

LilRabbit

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Here in Pittsburgh we have some phrases that make no sense or are pretty stupid, but overall awesome.

Crick = Creek
Dewg or Dug = Dog
Warsh = Wash
Jagoff = ??? (synonym for asshole or jackass I guess)

There's an entire Pittsburgh dictionary I found on Geocities while writing this post up... plenty of random stuff we do.

http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Port/9832/pittsburgh.html
 

ayanna

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Where to begin...

loonie
A dollar. The Canadian $1 coin has a loon (the bird) on one side.

toonie
Two dollars. The Canadian $2 coin is gold-coloured in the middle, with a silver-coloured ring around the outside. It takes its name from the $1 coin, the loonie, and adds its value, two, to form "twonie" or, more easily read, "toonie". A polar bear is on one side of this coin.

pogey
Unemployment benefits. "I'm getting pogey" means, as the British would say, "I'm on the dole."

serviette
French for "napkin". This term is used by anglophones as well as francophones.

washroom
bathroom

housecoat
robe, bathrobe

chesterfield
A couch or sofa.

poutine
Québecois specialty. French fries covered in cheese curds and gravy.

toque
A kind
of wintertime hat.

case
A case of 12 bottles of beer.

two-four
A box/case of 24 bottles of beer.

just to name a few :)
 

Charlie

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serviette
French for "napkin". This term is used by anglophones as well as francophones.
Ooo, we say that here too. Except that "serviette" carries a working class connotation here. If you're posh, then it's always "napkin".

Oh, and we call "bathrobes" "dressing gowns" here.
 

ade

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more Tom & Mary; that's Lanky: Lancastrian. aye, we have our own english language, though it's only been documented in one book, as far as i know, and that was printed before WWI....and i've never found a copy. our english is what most people would call 'olde worlde' and most of our words and phrases will be passed off as 'old use' in dictionaries, despite them still being commonly used. compulsary education and mass media spelled the end for most of our oral culture and tradition. what's left are just fragments, some used frenquently, others less and more for show. in northern england, we also still use the traditional germanic vowels, with a mix of the gaelic, as opposed to the south where they seem to have adopted french vowels.
and the vowel difference comes into play with the development of certain words and sounds; the 'ight' (of night, light, etc ) and it's corruption being the most notable: up here, we have a common usage of neet, leet and reet for night, light and right, and this stems from the use of the original short vowel and the dropping of the 'gh' sound. if you say the original words naturally, pronouncing all the sounds, you can see how easily it corrupts into an 'eet' sound. me do'th ponder if similar happens in other germanic speaking countries?

Owt = anything
Nowt = nothing
aye = yes
nay = no
noggin = head
muffin = barm-cake/tea-cake
butty = sandwich
myther = to annoy or pester
mard = someone who is soft or easily upset (commonly used with the suffix 'arse')
arse = bum/buttocks
sod = turf and a common derogatory term (this came up in chat at TBN and when someone internetted it, it came back as 'old use'. it's used everyday, though)
thee/tha/thou/thy = as per old english (used mainly for show, nowadays)

...and loads more which you just use without thinking and only realise when talking to foreigners (anyone who isn't Lancastrian) or leafing through a dictionary and there you see your culture described as 'old use' or 'no longer used'.

and if you were wondering why this is an interest to me, it's because i spent my childhood saying 'aye', but thinking i was saying 'eye', simply because i had never seen 'aye' written (i rationalised it at the time as meaning ' i see' and 'i understand' within a context of 'yes' or a confirmation).
 

Tigger

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We also say serviette, I always thought that was the correct term. I thought everybody said it but it appears not. Here's another few I thought of (some bad language here, sorry in advance :p):

Dunny, loo, shithouse == toilet (the term shithouse is also used to describe something that sucks, like "I don't like that, it's shithouse"
Cuppa == a cup of coffee (or sometimes a cup of tea or other hot beverage)
Plonk, grog, piss == Alcamahol
pissed, plastered, smashed == (very) drunk. Smashed can also be used as a term for stoned.
pisspot, pisshead == Somebody who likes to drink alot
built like a brick shithouse == a very muscley person or somebody of a large build
dickhead == somebody that is an idiot (I thought they said this everywhere but I guess not since I've said it in IRC and people have been all "wtf")
silly as a two bob watch == Somebody who is very stupid. Often used as a term equal to crazy.

I have heaps more but that's all that comes to mind at the present moment.
 

Yawnie

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oooh, I have another one, but not that many ppl. here use it that much, and you will see why....

"shit tickets"=toilet paper

lmao
 
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