Expressions from where you're at!

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Charlie

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(Thanks to Pramrider for giving me the idea for this thread!)

Well, this forum has people from all over the world! And in every country, or even in every town there are wonderful little expressions that come about.
So lets share them!
(Obviously if it's in a different language you might want to translate it, I'm hoping things won't get totally lost in translation).

So I live in Lancashire England, I'll copy these across from the other thread:
Here:
"Dinner" is called "tea".
"Lunch" is called "dinner".
"Cock" is a term of affection (no really!).
"While" means "until" (as well as its usual meaning).

And one that isn't specific to Lancashire that you might be wondering about:

"You're having a bubble!" means "you're having a laugh!". It's cockney rhyming slang.
Laugh rhymes with "bubble bath", and this gets shortened to "bubble".

Another example is "berk", which means a very rude word that begins with a C! (Although the word "berk" isn't offensive).
That comes from "Berkeley Hunt", which is very interesting because in English "Berkeley" is pronounced "Barkeley", yet "berk" is pronounced as an American would say it.

So that's my little contribution! What's yours?
 

Vladimir

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Quebec curses:

Osti
Tabarnak
Ciboire
Christ
Câlice

So basically, all the stuff you see in churches are Quebec curses.
 

MommyBarbara

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The Barbie

This expression is what I heard in passing from two guys talking to each other, after I had first gotten to the land of Oz.

"C'mon mate, let's draw out the barbie, and have a go at some drinks."

All right, I'm an American, tell me what this means.
 

Pojo

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This expression is what I heard in passing from two guys talking to each other, after I had first gotten to the land of Oz.

"C'mon mate, let's draw out the barbie, and have a go at some drinks."

All right, I'm an American, tell me what this means.

Let's get the barbeque(or grill) and have some drinks(alcoholic) is what I think it means...


Soda - Pop - Cola
 

Vladimir

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Okay, a few others:

Blonde: (Girl) Lover (the normal French expression is Amoureuse)
Chum: (Boy) Lover (the normal French expression is Amoureux)
Tata: Idiot

There are so many I'm forgetting them. >_>
 

IncompleteDude

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toque = warm winter hat
chesterfield = couch
eh = "Don't you know" or "What?" depending on context
colour is spelt with a 'U'
z = Zed not zee
 

Sawaa

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Lesse..Australia's got so many XD And I'm not originally from here, so please do let me know if I've interpreted them wrong :3

Bloody Oath - Absolutely. Positively!
Fair-dinkum - 100% true. The real thing, etc. But also used as a statement of rhetorical disbelief; for example "So, did you hear that Sawaa girl used to be a boy?" "Fair dinkum..?"
Hard yakka - Hard work
Sparrows fart - Really early in the morning XD
She'll be right - Kind've a dismissive statement of encouragement.
 
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"C'mon mate, let's draw out the barbie, and have a go at some drinks."
My good friend, what a glorious day it is to cook on the outdoor hotplate unit, whilst enjoying in the finer taste of a refreshing alcoholic beverage. :p

Mmm, honestly, I can't think of anything specific. It's all become second nature and I say most colloquialisms without thinking about it.

Just go pick up an Aussie slang dictionary!
 
F

FullMetal

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Thats what she said! - Honestly if you don't get what that means....

...we are not friends.

FullMetal
 

Vladimir

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Thats what she said! - Honestly if you don't get what that means....

...we are not friends.

FullMetal
I heard it was used to turn anything into a sexual joke but English entertainment is still a mystery for me.
 

Pramrider

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Let's see......In Baltimore midday meal was lunch and the later meal was dinner or supper. Go one state South to Virginia and lunch becomes dinner, supper is only called supper.

One of the *Balmerean* terms other than pronouncing Baltimore as *Balmer* is calling the kitchen sink the kitchen *zink*. Oh, and if you have *dibs* on anything it means that's the one you want to have.

Have to think of some additional expressions peculiar to Balmer or Merlin and post them later.:D

Glad you went ahead and started this thread, Charlie. Looks like it'll be an interesting one!:)

~Pramrider
 

PuddleFopsKit

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I too have what Fullmetal said. "That's what she said" is f-ing popular down here, and it drives me absoultely nuts. It is a sexual reference that can be used as a response to anything dirty sounding.

"That slays me," is also popular down here. "slay" is used in place of kill.
"fixin" This mean the same as "about". "I'm about to!" or "I'm fixin to!", means the same thing.
"Vibe" That one is dirty.. This is a type of sexual intercourse between two men. I don't know if I'm allowed to say what it is or not, so I'll let you use your imagination on that one.
"Razor; Sharp" Both of these mean the same as "cool" or "awesome". It's usually used like "sounds razor" or "sounds sharp", in reponse to a suggestive question.

That's all I can think of right now..
 

Yawnie

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ALL CANADIANS SHOULD KNOW THE FIRST ONE!!!

double double-A coffee with double cream and double sugar

yup-yes

by the by(e)-by the way

shinney-a pick up game of hockey

hooky-skipping school

(and that's all I can think of right now)
 
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Damn you foreigners and your awesome expressions.

Only one I can remember is my Grandma calls a couch a davenport.

:p
 

Vladimir

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ALL CANADIANS EXCEPT QUEBECERS SHOULD KNOW THE FIRST ONE!!!

double double-A coffee with double cream and double sugar

yup-yes

by the by(e)-by the way

shinney-a pick up game of hockey

hooky-skipping school

(and that's all I can think of right now)
Fix'd.
 

BromeTeks

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How about hand symbols? like having your index and middle finger held up and spread apart means (from what I know) Peace in the U.S.A, Victory in the United Kingdom, and F**k you in Australia.
 

Charlie

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How about hand symbols? like having your index and middle finger held up and spread apart means (from what I know) Peace in the U.S.A, Victory in the United Kingdom, and F**k you in Australia.
Victory? From what I know, if it's the palm side of your hand that's facing the person it's directed at it means peace... and if it's the other side it means "**** you/off".

I thought of another thing:
"I'm on my Bill" or "I'm on my Todd". Both of these mean "I'm by myself"/"I'm alone".
I think it comes from "Billy no-mates", someone who hasn't got any friends!
 

Pramrider

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An old expression over here you don't hear very much is "marking time", which basically means taking a break.

Jack, lettuce, bread, moola, hot sauce, clams, scratch, and greenbacks are all slang terms for money. "Greasing my palm" means hand me over some money.

~Pramrider
 
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Oh, and if you have *dibs* on anything it means that's the one you want to have.
We also use that term down here... it's not widely spoken, but enough such that it's noticeable. We also use the term "shotgun" to mean they same thing. Like, "Shotgun the last piece of cake!" = "Dibs on the last piece of cake!" = "I lay claim to the last piece of cake!"


Jack, lettuce, bread, moola, hot sauce, clams, scratch, and greenbacks are all slang terms for money.
Moola(h) would be understood to be money here. It's rarely used, but in every instance I've heard it, the person was referring to money.

As for the term "Greenback" - you basically hear it every night on the news here. When they come to the financial section, they always do a quick segment on currency exchange rates. Most of the time they say it as, "The Aussie dollar is going strong against the Greenback."
 
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