Dog Breeds

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So I now live in PA, but home is in St. Louis. My family dog is probably not going to make it to July :sad:. I've been considering getting my own little buddy for a while now, and I just might do it in the spring or next summer when I have the time to dedicate to a puppy. I've been considering a Chinnok, but they are somewhat expensive. What breeds do you like? What are the pluses, and what are the negatives? If you own one, what are roughly its monthly costs?

Btw, I'm not interested in tiny dogs.
 

thedlguy

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My favorites are Golden Retrievers. They are well behaved and fairly easy to train. MY dog was awesome, but she was put down for seizures a couple years ago :( Never barked and was like on of the family
 

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You could get a Fox Terrier? They aren't tiny, and make great companions. Though, they are that type of dog that barks a lot unfortunately (I own one) And they do seem to pay too much attention to the T.V!

But, they are easy to housetrain, and are pretty friendly if you make sure they're social enough.
 
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I like goldens, but I don't know if I want a long haired dog. I shed enough as it is. I also live in an apartment, so barking is a no.
 

thedlguy

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Well there are the Goldendoodles, and they are cute looking, dont shed either, but they are rather spendy. I brushed Molly daily and she would get her "crew cut" in the summer lol
 

Prussic_aux

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I like goldens, but I don't know if I want a long haired dog. I shed enough as it is. I also live in an apartment, so barking is a no.

Hmmm, maybe you could get a beagle? They're short haired and apparently pretty quiet (just don't let them roll in stuff, they have a tendency to do that)
 

Maxicoon

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Hmmm, maybe you could get a beagle? They're short haired and apparently pretty quiet (just don't let them roll in stuff, they have a tendency to do that)

LOL beagles quiet? We had to get a shock collar to get ours to be quiet. Don't get me wrong i love this dog to death and wouldn't trade her for the world but she never stops barking. not to mention the bark is so loud that she would wake up half the neighborhood. But in the end I still love that lemon headed little dog and she's the sweetest dog you'll ever meet.
 

Prussic_aux

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LOL beagles quiet? We had to get a shock collar to get ours to be quiet. Don't get me wrong i love this dog to death and wouldn't trade her for the world but she never stops barking. not to mention the bark is so loud that she would wake up half the neighborhood. But in the end I still love that lemon headed little dog and she's the sweetest dog you'll ever meet.

Oh, maybe it's just me then. Every beagle I've met has been pretty quiet heh
 
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Have you considered a boxer?

The thing you'd have to watch with them is (1) they overheat easily, what with their short snout and all ... but you're not in Arizona so that should be manageable; (2) they get all lumpy after 10-12 years (tumors).

When I get a "real place" with a yard and such I'm going to probably get a boxer. They are excitable without being bouncing-off-the-walls nuts, enjoy a good walk a day, and are intelligent and social.
 

dlt88

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I got a dog my freshman year and while I readily admit it is probably the biggest mistake of my college career, I wouldn't change anything. It was a really tough adjustment at first but once I learned his quirks and he learned mine, its been smooth sailing.

I adopted my dog, a border collie, from a no-kill animal shelter. He had been returned twice before for destroying an oriental rug and his kennel and had a pretty bad case of separation anxiety. Guess I had sucker written all over my face. I wasn't working for the first couple of weeks that I had him and things were fine, but then I started working and one day came home to find he had attacked the window sills of the apartment...wood chips where every where.

That episode forced me to get him into obedience training, something I should have done when I first got him. He has since completed all levels and gotten his CGC. The obedience training really did make all the difference. He had to learn to trust me which proved crucial to him understanding that I would come back home for him. We tried medicine and all kinds of different treatments but nothing made as big of a difference as the training did.

A dog is a huge responsibility. It has needs and will depend solely on you to fulfill them. You can't just return the dog like a pair of shoes if things don't work out. You are making a commitment to care for and provide for the dog for the next 10-15 years.

I strongly encourage you to visit an animal shelter before buying a dog from a breeder. DO NOT buy a dog from a pet store, whatever you do. Animal shelters have a huge selection of dogs in all breeds and ages and it will give you an opportunity to spend time with all of them to determine which one is right for you. The shelter dog will forever be grateful to you for giving him a good home. Not to mention, the cost is much more reasonable with adoption fees ranging from about $20 to $100. The dog will come completely up to date on shots, spayed/neutered, and microchiped..saving you a lot of money in up front costs. A far cry from the $500+ most breeders charge. Also, think long and hard about getting a puppy. Puppies are a lot of work. They are cute and cuddly at first, but that sentiment will fade quickly after they chew up your favorite pair of shoes.

Start by checking with your apartment building as to what breed you can get. Most buildings have weight and/or breed restrictions. Boxers, Terriers, Bulldogs are all typically banned by most buildings.

I really my border collie and will most likely be getting them for the rest of my life. The breed is extremely intelligent...its almost like having another person around. He has completely mastered all of my mannerisms and has my daily routine down to a science. Dog always knows what is going on and I like that. He's very energetic and is always ready to go on a new adventure. I really like having a smart dog.

As for costs, well, he is pretty expensive. I have a PetSmart Wellness Plan for him, which costs about $25.00 a month and that takes care of the majority of his veterinary needs. I never have to pay for an office visit and he receives a set amount of procedures, vaccines, tests, etc. included in the plan. Your vet bill will be the most expensive part of owning a dog. They have to get regular check ups and vaccines and there is nothing you can do about it but write the check. Food varies...you want to make sure you are feeding the dog a fairly decent food. Old Yeller and Kibbles n' Bits don't really count...its like feeding your dog a bag of potato chips. A decent 50-pound bag of dog food will run you about $50 and should last for about two months. Factor in about $10-20 extra for bones, treats, etc. Depending on your breed, grooming could be a regular expense. My border collie doesn't need to be groomed per say, but I do bring him to get a good scrubbing and have his teeth, nails and ears taken care of about every three months or so...that usually costs $30. I give him a bath myself every month or so. Obedience training classes, which I strongly recommend regardless of what breed of dog you get, should be about $100 per 6 or 8 week class. I still have my dog in agility training, so that fee is a regular fee for me. You also have to think about what your going to do when you go out of town..take the dog with you, board him, hire a pet sitter. Since my dog has so much energy, I do take him to dog day care 2-3 times a week, every week. It really is a god send and totally worth the cost...about $15 a day. Owning a dog is not cheap, and while the money is an adjustment at first, it becomes second nature after awhile. You just have to learn that you aren't alone anymore and are responsible for someone else' s needs.

While the road was long and bumpy at first, everything smoothed out after we got to know each other. He is my best friend..always there when I need him with a big smile on his face. I would do absolutely anything for him and couldn't imagine my life without him.
 

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Well I personally know a Great Pyrenees/Rough Collie cross
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They need constant grooming, and it can take 3 people 2 hours to get it done. They are barkers and diggers, and very high energy for a big dog; the one I know still thinks and acts like a teenager. Both breeds are work dogs so she would much rather be free ranging on a big property, doing something like herding. Also she has a very good nose and eyesight.

UMMMM so I guess that would be exactly what you don't want, on all counts.
 
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Dan09

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I've had my Siberian Husky Randy since I moved to the states. They are great dogs that rarely bark, have tons of intelligence, and can thrive in rough conditions (we play in the snow every winter).

Plus, he's a great pillow when im sleeping on the floor or whatever (joking).
 
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