Do You Need Baby Powder and Diaper Cream When Wearing Training Pants?

ABDElsa

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I got a couple pairs of Training Pants that I wear all day to work once a week. Since they're the same material as regular Tighty Whiteys basically just thicker I figure I don't need Baby Powder or Diaper Cream right? I mean we don't use Baby Powder or Diaper Cream when wearing Tighty Whiteys/Boxers/Panties so, I would think the same would apply to Training Pants right? Let me know your thoughts on this in the comments below, thanks and as always...stay Diapered!🧷:)
-ABDElsa ❄️🍼
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Nowididit

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I would think baby powder would be fine but not sure about the ointments. Most ointments have some kind of petroleum and I would think that they would bleed into the fabric of a reusable training pant. As far as disposables, you're going to throw it out anyway so lather it on.
 
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Belarin

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Powder should be fine to use if you really want to, though I've said it before, a powders purpose is to dry the area off after washing/using wet wipes and people tend to use it excessivly (each to their own and if that's what you like then go for it).

Many diaper creams are not very good for cloth products (especially if they contain zinc oxide) they do not always fully wash out and can build up over time preventing the material from absorbing properly. If you're not planning to "use" the training pants then this shouldn't be a problem just make sure to wash them thoroughly.
 
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ABDElsa

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Belarin said:
Powder should be fine to use if you really want to, though I've said it before, a powders purpose is to dry the area off after washing/using wet wipes and people tend to use it excessivly (each to their own and if that's what you like then go for it).

Many diaper creams are not very good for cloth products (especially if they contain zinc oxide) they do not always fully wash out and can build up over time preventing the material from absorbing properly. If you're not planning to "use" the training pants then this shouldn't be a problem just make sure to wash them thoroughly.
I thought Powder was specifically to prevent Diaper rash due to prolonged wearing. You're telling me Powder should only be used after washing/using Baby wipes?! Not when planning on wearing a Diaper for extended periods time?! Also yes I plan on "using" the Training Pants and I don't wanna mess up the absorbency so, I won't use Diaper Cream.
 

Belarin

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Yes.

Powder began being used in diapering a little over 100 years ago (about the 1890's) when J&J offered its Talcum powder to help prevent babies and children's skin irritation and rashes due to excessive moisture.

Back then there were no disposable diapers or baby wipes like we have now (toilet paper was invented in the 1850's but would not have been used much for babies as it was thick, harsh and scratchy against the skin, the first commercial disposable wet wipe wasn't available until 1957).

All babies would have been in cloth diapers and when used parents would clean them with a damp cloth, sponge or rag, it was believed (almost) correctly that it was simply the wetness of the skin that caused rashes and skin problems so J&J began marketing its baby powder made from talcum. The original idea was that after washing a baby and gently patting them dry (after a bath or diaper change) you would spread around and rub in a small amount of the powder to remove any remaining moisture before putting a diaper back on.

The amount used should be just enough to leave the baby's skin dry with no additional residue, if you see patches of loose powder or can blow hard on the area it is applied and see a cloud of dust you have used too much. This did help to some degree as persistant dampness can cause problems but we now understand that diaper rash is also caused by other factors like yeasts and bacteria developing on the skin and the buildup of amonia produced when urine is exposd to air.

The use of baby powder began to decline when people began to complain of medical and health issues after using it either by exposure to sensitive areas or by breathing in the dust when applying it (again due to incorrectly just sprinkling it over a baby and shaking the bottle so it puffs upwards, it should instead be poured lightly and closly into a hand and then rubbed in). Claims that talcum powder was carcinogenic and causing cancer began to spread, it has since been discovered that talc itself is not carcinogenic but in it's natural state can contain asbestos which is.

Alternative powders that used things like corn starch began to crop up but the declining use of powder was pushed further by the advent of disposable diapers more so as time went on and they became more sophisticated and better able to keep moisture away from the baby's skin. Using powder in a disposable (especially when used excessively) can clog up the specialty fabrics (like the ADL layer) used thus preventing them from working as intended, to quickly wick moisture away and keep it away from the skin.

Now I use cloth, both diapers and wipes so I'm happy using a powder to dry off after wiping myself down, but I see some people using disposables who prep the diaper by sprinkling it all over (which will do nothing but clog the diaper up) and then laying down and putting a thick layer of powder all over themsleves to the point that it looks like they were out sleeping in the snow.
If this is what makes them happy by all means carry on but not only is it preventing their disposable from wicking correctly it actually makes it more likely to cause a rash as that powder will soak up urine and clump up as a paste, sitting on the skin as a perfect breeding ground for bacteria as it rubs against and abrades the skin.

I know people will argue against this but this is the story of baby powder and the results of many medical and product studies carried out over the last 100 years.
 
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Belarin

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Also for the second part of this post...
ABDElsa said:
Also yes I plan on "using" the Training Pants and I don't wanna mess up the absorbency so, I won't use Diaper Cream.
Creams can still be used just again make sure to follow the directions properly, here in the UK sudocreme is a favourite rash cream for most parents however no one seems to know how to use it properly.

If you follow the instructions on sudocreme's website a small amount should be rubbed into the skin until it is practically transparent if you still see white there is too much cream there. Each cream will have its own directions but again most people tend to use far too much thinking that more is better.

Another thing people tend to do is use a rash healing cream like sudocreme (designed to clear a rash up) at every single change whether there is a rash or not. This is what barrier creams are for, they do not heal a rash but try to prevent it occurring in the first place and are meant to be used on every change unless there is a rash developing then you switch to a healing cream.

If using disposables this probably isn't a problem as it's not really going to cause the skin harm using a healing cream all the time and since they are one use the cream buildup is a non issue. But wearing cloth products creams will begin to build up in them and prevent them from working fully.
There are cloth safe barrier creams out there, and occasional use of healing creams in cloth is fine if it's only when needed and being properly washed, this means following your machines instructions for load size and type as well as choosing a cloth diaper suitable detergent and following the directions on the pack for amount to use, more soap doesn't = cleaner diapers (quite the opposite).
 
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ABDElsa

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@Belarin
Wow you sure know a lot about this stuff! Are you a pediatrician?
 

Belarin

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ABDElsa said:
@Belarin
Wow you sure know a lot about this stuff! Are you a pediatrician?
Not quite but I do work with children. I just like to research and learn things, especially the history of things.
 
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