Do all monotheistic religions warship the same God?

RedPandaDL

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I am a faithful church going Christian. I am not a religion scholar. I am also not an expert on world religions unless you count watching the History Channel and National Geographic 😀. I have noticed though through some of these programs that many religions have similar genesis stories and flood stories as well as similar teachings to the Ten Commandments.

The Bible teaches that everyone on Earth are God’s children. At least I think it says that. I am wondering if as people spread over the Earth that the religion stories took on different variations? I believe in the teachings of Jesus, but don’t feel I can tell anyone of a different religion that their religion is wrong. Maybe non are completely correct or wrong. Maybe we just don’t have the full story. I plan to stick to the Christian teachings and maybe in heaven I will be shown a bigger picture.

So what do others think? Are we all believing in the same God though different teachings?🤔
 

Trevor

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Although I'm not a believer anymore, this idea is something I had lived with for some time when I was religious. It came from here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_revelation_(Bahá'í)

If it were true, it explained a lot to me. However, there are aspects outside of this that created problems for me and ultimately led to my rejection of that and other religions.
 

CrinklyConnor

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I think you mean Abrahamic religions. There have been plenty of “monotheistic” religions that do not worship the same god in any sense, but if you’re talking about the god that’s worshipped in both Christian and Muslim worlds, in simple, simple religious context - yes.
 

RedPandaDL

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I think you mean Abrahamic religions. There have been plenty of “monotheistic” religions that do not worship the same god in any sense, but if you’re talking about the god that’s worshipped in both Christian and Muslim worlds, in simple, simple religious context - yes.
I was actually thinking beyond just the Abrahamic religions.
 

siysiy

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we have all come from the same route and that is why the flood story is found across the world. and so on. the big difference between christianaility and other religions is ours is faith based. we live by faith not by the law.


Galatians 2:16

16know that a man is not justified by works of the Law,but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we, too, have believedin Christ Jesus, that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by works of the Law, because by worksof the Law no one will be justified.


Galatians 3:11

11And it is clear that no one is justified beforeGod by the Law, because, “The righteous will live byfaith.”

Hugs
 

Drifter

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Years ago I read about a Russian scientist's research on similarities in ancient religions, including some new world religions, which he attributed to ancient people's interpretation of natural events that happened on a global scale. He mentioned the flood, and talked about geological evidence around the world of floods much greater than anything experienced in modern times. Other similarities in religious dogma he found were 10 loud noises, and a horned bovine creature (the golden calf in Exodus, the sacred cow of India, and the bull found in many religions). His theory was that a near collision with a large comet caused the sights, sounds, and earthquakes, that led people around the world to include these things in their religious mythology. Whether you accept his theory or not, his research was fascinating.
 

Sapphyre

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I am a faithful church going Christian. I am not a religion scholar. I am also not an expert on world religions unless you count watching the History Channel and National Geographic 😀. I have noticed though through some of these programs that many religions have similar genesis stories and flood stories as well as similar teachings to the Ten Commandments.

The Bible teaches that everyone on Earth are God’s children. At least I think it says that. I am wondering if as people spread over the Earth that the religion stories took on different variations? I believe in the teachings of Jesus, but don’t feel I can tell anyone of a different religion that their religion is wrong. Maybe non are completely correct or wrong. Maybe we just don’t have the full story. I plan to stick to the Christian teachings and maybe in heaven I will be shown a bigger picture.

So what do others think? Are we all believing in the same God though different teachings?🤔
Initially, I had thought you were asking about the Abrahamic religions too… but now let me re-think the question.

It would be interesting to have a high-level ancestral history of major world religions, similarly to how we have studied the ancestry and historical development of different languages. I would think someone has studied this by now… and I would also be rather surprised if it turned out that all monotheistic religions had a common ancestor or origin. That would be quite interesting!

That said, a more abstract way of looking at it: if each of several religions recognizes the existence of a singular God, can this very singularity of existence be used as an identifying characteristic such that it always refers to the same God, by definition, even if various religions otherwise characterize this "God" quite differently from one another? Is there, in a theological sense, a difference between worshipping a "false God" and a "true God who has been falsely characterized or described"? Is the identity separate from the description?

Personally, FWIW, I think that each person who worships a single God has their own understanding of who / what that God is, and so to some extent, each such person really has their own religion. But the agreement in broad strokes with others of the "same" faith is significant and helpful.

Also, without derailing the entire discussion into a side-topic, I personally think that "correct or wrong" is a mental heuristic with intrinsic limits, and these limits hinder attempts to understand the "bigger picture", just as all of our previous mental projections have, historically (remember when the planets moved in weird epicycle patterns around the Earth, which obviously sits at the center of the universe?).

Those are my first thoughts anyway. ^.^
 

Cottontail

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I think the answer is a clear "no," even if you focus only on the Abrahamic religions. These religions are, despite common historical roots, bitterly divided on the fundamentals of how one honors God and achieves/retains God's favor for the afterworld. If you work backwards from these practices, you really have to conclude that they emanate from very different images of God. If they didn't, then the choice of religion would be arbitrary. But I don't think many Muslims, Christians, or Jews would say, "Hey, just pick one. Whatever!"
 
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Drifter

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By default, IF there is only one god, then everyone that believes in a single god believes in the same god, but from their own unique perspective, which often seems to make the beliefs incompatible. As I see it, "God" is a symbol of the mystery of the universe which we all approach with our own special blend of religion, science, and philosophy.
 

tiny

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By default, IF there is only one god, then everyone that believes in a single god believes in the same god...
That's clearly not true. People have believed in all sorts of monotheistic gods: Shangdi, Tian, various sun gods, or Shiva (in many interpretations), to name a few.

I don't know how you could claim that they're all the same person...

IF god existed, than everyone who believed in him for sensible reasons would agree on his nature. But they don't.
 
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Seasonedcitizen

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I can't tell you what book it is in but Jesus said that their is no way to the Father but through him.

We all have to die before we learn who is right. IMG_0712.JPG
 

dogboy

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Though this doesn't answer the question, I've always thought of God as an immense mountain, so big that no one can see all of it, just the part reveled from where they're standing. Each little area sees and describes God from their vantage point. God is steep and foreboding, or God is a gentle incline with green pastures. We each have our unique and different understanding of whatever is the same thing.

That doesn't answer the question. I think Tiny is more on tract if one considers non Abrahamic religions simply because how these gods are defined which are so very different from the Abrahamic depiction of god.
 

Sapphyre

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Though this doesn't answer the question, I've always thought of God as an immense mountain, so big that no one can see all of it, just the part reveled from where they're standing. Each little area sees and describes God from their vantage point. God is steep and foreboding, or God is a gentle incline with green pastures. We each have our unique and different understanding of whatever is the same thing.

That doesn't answer the question. I think Tiny is more on tract if one considers non Abrahamic religions simply because how these gods are defined which are so very different from the Abrahamic depiction of god.
I really like that analogy. ^.^

So the next logical question is: how different is "too different"? How can one distinguish when they are observing different faces of the same infinite mountain, rather than two different mountains? At what point can "contradictions" no longer be explained as differing interpretations? It's a curiously fuzzy issue (at least to me, so far!). Thoughts?
 
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MrGnome

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From studying many different religions, I do believe their all talking about the same thing. My biggest concern is in every religion that worships this so called. "god" or "gods", has an over inflated ego. So inflated it makes me question if this thing or things was even a god. Why would god possess an ego? Isn't the ego looked down upon in most religions? Why would god need to be worshipped?

I think it makes more sense what these ancient people were describing were actual aliens that acted like gods. To these ancient people these things would look like gods.

I would imagine the REAL god would NOT be male/female and may just be an energy force that flows through all living things.
 

RedPandaDL

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I wondered how long it would take for someone to bring up ancient aliens on this thread. About the only thing I can say to that is God created the Earth, which means he is not from this Earth an therefore by definition is extraterrestrial. Since I don’t know where God came from, or where heaven is located, it is hard to dispute that possibility. Also with the universe being so large, it is hard to say if we are the only life out there.
 

Carnifex

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I am a faithful church going Christian. I am not a religion scholar. I am also not an expert on world religions unless you count watching the History Channel and National Geographic 😀. I have noticed though through some of these programs that many religions have similar genesis stories and flood stories as well as similar teachings to the Ten Commandments.

The Bible teaches that everyone on Earth are God’s children. At least I think it says that. I am wondering if as people spread over the Earth that the religion stories took on different variations? I believe in the teachings of Jesus, but don’t feel I can tell anyone of a different religion that their religion is wrong. Maybe non are completely correct or wrong. Maybe we just don’t have the full story. I plan to stick to the Christian teachings and maybe in heaven I will be shown a bigger picture.

So what do others think? Are we all believing in the same God though different teachings?🤔
I am a new Christian and I feel like all the God's are the same it's what you want feel in your heart and soul and I feel nothing but love for everyone we should always have love for everyone no matter what
 

Drifter

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I don't know how you could claim that they're all the same person...

IF god existed, than everyone who believed in him for sensible reasons would agree on his nature. But they don't.
It's the old 'blind men and the elephant' paradox. People experiencing the same thing from different perspectives easily end up with fundamentally different beliefs. Is Trump the savior or destroyer of America, or something in between? And I suspect the nature of God would be infinitely more complex than the nature of a person. In line with what Dogboy said, the totality of God could be beyond the capability of anyone to know. And yet I'm open to the possibility that we all know God intimately. We just don't know that we know. o_O
 

willnotwill

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As Garrison Keillor pointed out that everybody in Minnesota is a Lutheran. Even the atheists, for it is a Lutheran God they don't believe in."
 

tiny

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Though this doesn't answer the question, I've always thought of God as an immense mountain, so big that no one can see all of it, just the part reveled from where they're standing. Each little area sees and describes God from their vantage point. God is steep and foreboding, or God is a gentle incline with green pastures. We each have our unique and different understanding of whatever is the same thing.
The same parable has appeared in several forms, and spread through many cultures through oral tradition. One of the most well-known is The Blind Men and the Elephant. It was recorded in The Udana, a Buddhist text, in around 500 BCE. It shows how blind faith leads people to believing in nonsense.


That doesn't answer the question. I think Tiny is more on tract if one considers non Abrahamic religions simply because how these gods are defined which are so very different from the Abrahamic depiction of god.
Yeah... Suggesting that every monotheistic believer is "seeing" the same one god seems to be "begging the question". It presupposes that there is only one god.

Pascal's Wager is invalid for the same reason -- it presumes that everyone knows what god is.
 

BobaFettish

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I think among the Abrahamic religions, I think yes with Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Now I remember being in Sunday School as a kid and was told how everyone else is wrong, other religions and even denominations.
I like the mountain or elephant analogy.
I have a gumbo of faith. Jesus is my roux, but I've got wisdom from a lot of the world religions, philosophies, writings, movies, etc in my spiritual gumbo.
 
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