Did a few aspie tests, now what?

Hakanloaim

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Hi everyone :)

A few years ago, when I was still living with my mother (it was around the end of university or soon after I graduated), she told me that a neighbour asked her whether or not I was autistic. I was told that my behaviour was a little bit too childish in public and it makes people believe I am autistic and she was not happy with it. I didn’t care of what of what people think but I started to question myself. I eventually learned that there is an autistic spectrum and that someone could have autistic traits without actually being autistic. Maybe the way I was acting corresponded to the behaviour of someone on the spectrum. So I may have autistic traits, which is nothing to worry about, so the matter was settled.

Earlier this year, on another ABDL forum, a new thread was opened about the link between having the Asperger syndrome and being an ABDL. People said there were online tests and yesterday I decided to do a few of them. I already knew than online psychological tests are basically for funsies but the ones I did appear to be serious yet not real diagnoses of course.

So long story short, on the four tests I did, 3 of them said I am likely an aspie. One of them says that my score links to a 99 % chance of being one. The only test that gave me a more normal score was the one where I had to answer randomly due to the lack of an “I don’t know” option so it’s not accurate. Now I don’t know what to do with all this. Do I really want to know if I am an aspie? Yes, who wouldn’t? Do I need to know? There is no answer. The thing is, I can live normally. There are some difficult situations for me, that are also difficult for autistic people according to my readings, but they are really uncommon (there is one coming this monday). Should I seek professional help? Should I discuss about it with my parents? I need your help. Please ask for details if you need them to answer.

TL;DR: tests were positive and I don’t know what to do with the results
 

DanielW

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I got diagnosed as ASD level 2 at 30. and there are pros and cons to getting tested and then what you do with that knowledge.

It can be both helpful and hurtful to employment. On one hand, you can legally request accomodiations for your disability in the workplace. On ther other, people can (and do) covertly discriminate or have a bias against disabled employees, so it can be better from a career standpoint not to disclose that.

Having a real diagnosis can also be useful on a personal level, to know, "Hey there's a reason I am the way I am" . Unfortunately, as an adult, there aren't a lot of support programs and or services out there. Most people seem to think we've all had early interventions and/or autism magically disappears at 18.

I don't regret getting tested, but it also hasn't been very helpful either.
 
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tiny

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I get the same thing with those tests -- and my response was the same... what now...?

I mentioned it to my psychotherapist and a few friends, and even my GP, but they all looked at me like I was a crazy hypochondriac and told me not to worry about it, but if I was really worried I could ask to be tested. I was pretty much dissuaded from investigating further.

I'd like a professional opinion, but... it's so subjective for those on the milder end of the spectrum, I'm not sure how much I'd trust even a professional opinion. Also, I'm not sure what I'd do with the information. I'm all for learning more about myself and self-improvement, but would "knowing" I was on the spectrum actually change anything... I dunno... :-/
 

Hakanloaim

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I got diagnosed as ASD level 2 at 30. and there are pros and cons to getting tested and then what you do with that knowledge.

It can be both helpful and hurtful to employment. On one hand, you can legally request accomodiations for your disability in the workplace. On ther other, people can (and do) covertly discriminate or have a bias against disabled employees, so it can be better from a career standpoint not to disclose that.
Of course that’s not something I’d be telling to anyone at work.

Having a real diagnosis can also be useful on a personal level, to know, "Hey there's a reason I am the way I am" . Unfortunately, as an adult, there aren't a lot of support programs and or services out there. Most people seem to think we've all had early interventions and/or autism magically disappears at 18.
That’s the main reason I think. Knowing yourself and putting words on some of the aspects of your mind is really important. Lack of support is only a problem if you really need support. Should I be an aspie, there is no real reason for me to have support as I could function quite properly. Of course if you do need support that’s another story.

I mentioned it to my psychotherapist and a few friends, and even my GP, but they all looked at me like I was a crazy hypochondriac and told me not to worry about it, but if I was really worried I could ask to be tested. I was pretty much dissuaded from investigating further.
Maybe you could view this from another perspective: whether you are autistic or not you can live normally so you don’t really need their help, but they are open to do a diagnosis if you want to dissipate the uncertainty. The end of your message seems to follow this point of view:

I'd like a professional opinion, but... it's so subjective for those on the milder end of the spectrum, I'm not sure how much I'd trust even a professional opinion. Also, I'm not sure what I'd do with the information. I'm all for learning more about myself and self-improvement, but would "knowing" I was on the spectrum actually change anything... I dunno... :-/
You know you might be autistic but not enough but the help provided after the diagnosis would be useless. The professionals you met may have understood this.

I have a similar opinion for my case: yes, I may be autistic but I don’t need any help, I just want to know myself better.
 

Calico

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Hi everyone :)

A few years ago, when I was still living with my mother (it was around the end of university or soon after I graduated), she told me that a neighbour asked her whether or not I was autistic. I was told that my behaviour was a little bit too childish in public and it makes people believe I am autistic and she was not happy with it. I didn’t care of what of what people think but I started to question myself. I eventually learned that there is an autistic spectrum and that someone could have autistic traits without actually being autistic. Maybe the way I was acting corresponded to the behaviour of someone on the spectrum. So I may have autistic traits, which is nothing to worry about, so the matter was settled.

Earlier this year, on another ABDL forum, a new thread was opened about the link between having the Asperger syndrome and being an ABDL. People said there were online tests and yesterday I decided to do a few of them. I already knew than online psychological tests are basically for funsies but the ones I did appear to be serious yet not real diagnoses of course.

So long story short, on the four tests I did, 3 of them said I am likely an aspie. One of them says that my score links to a 99 % chance of being one. The only test that gave me a more normal score was the one where I had to answer randomly due to the lack of an “I don’t know” option so it’s not accurate. Now I don’t know what to do with all this. Do I really want to know if I am an aspie? Yes, who wouldn’t? Do I need to know? There is no answer. The thing is, I can live normally. There are some difficult situations for me, that are also difficult for autistic people according to my readings, but they are really uncommon (there is one coming this monday). Should I seek professional help? Should I discuss about it with my parents? I need your help. Please ask for details if you need them to answer.

TL;DR: tests were positive and I don’t know what to do with the results

Things to consider here:

Lot of people have autistic traits and are not autistic.

Your symptoms have to cause you significant impairment for it to be a disorder.

You need to have enough symptoms to fit the criteria and they need to be significant enough and they need to happen often enough to fit it. There are gray areas there which makes it borderline AS/autism because they have significant impairments or they are only impaired when under stress or lot of pressure or having a bad day etc. but are fine when they are calm.

If your symptoms are causing you issues in life and giving you roadblocks and causing you problems in life making hard for you to function in life and move forward, you should go see a doctor then about it. If you think it isn't a concern, then no need to get tested for it. I'm baffled how people even get diagnosed when they are doing good in life and aren't impaired. I thought a diagnoses is only made if it is causing you impairments. If they are no longer causing you impairments because you had learned, then you wouldn't qualify for a diagnoses. But I guess every doctor is different and they bend the rules.
 

Hakanloaim

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@Calico I mostly agree with you. Having autistic traits does not mean being autistic. Impairments generated by those traits can be fixed by learning to the point of being autistic or not is irrelevant.

On the other hand, the grey area is uncomfortable. The following is just an hypothesis. reducing impairments could be done via several methods, some more suitable for neurotypical people and some others for autistic people. Using the right method is better, if only more effective, and because of this grey area it is difficult to chose the optimal one. If someone is clearly on one side of the spectrum it’s easier.

You say that diagnoses could be performed only when there are actual problems in the life of the person. In a perfect world, where medicine is strictly used to “fix” people, it might be true. If you learned how to “fix”, there is no more problems by definition. But some people may want to know whether their need to learn how to overcome their impairments is the same as what normal people need to do or if there is a real cause. For instance someone can think that their impairment, whether or not they can be overcome, are quite numerous or intense and wondering if this is normal.

To sum up, we seem to have similar opinions, however a diagnosis may help in getting more efficient means of overcome difficulties.
 

Calico

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Having autistic traits does not mean being autistic. Impairments generated by those traits can be fixed by learning to the point of being autistic or not is irrelevant.
It's relevant because I was told I have it and told I don't have it by my own mother and I was told it comes and goes and I slip in and out of autism. My husband describes it as coming in waves and the way he describes it is like how Bipolar works when their manic comes in waves and their exaggerated emotions so I guess they will mind as well call it Polar autism. I do have the Asperger diagnoses. So I was only talking about my experience when I was mentioning the gray area of a diagnoses. We exist. It's not black and white that if you don't have enough symptoms, you are fine and not impaired.
 
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Calico

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Put it this way, lot of autistic people are more autistic when they are tired or anxious or stressed. They may go from high functioning to low functioning and go from verbal to non verabl. Well there are people out there that go from you can say "normal" to autistic. I asked my husband that doesn't everyone act worse when stress or anxious or having a bad say and he told me it's how I express it when I am stressed or upset or overwhelmed, etc.

So there you go, a diagnoses is made by how you express it and how you react to a situation and if it makes it a symptom or not so I understand now how I got diagnosed.
 

Hakanloaim

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I’ve decided to research all autistic traits, with an accent on aspie traits, and to write down my memories that correspond to them. Starting this evening, I have written six pages already, including four and a half dedicated to anxiety.
 

caitianx

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Hi everyone :)

A few years ago, when I was still living with my mother (it was around the end of university or soon after I graduated), she told me that a neighbour asked her whether or not I was autistic. I was told that my behaviour was a little bit too childish in public and it makes people believe I am autistic and she was not happy with it. I didn’t care of what of what people think but I started to question myself. I eventually learned that there is an autistic spectrum and that someone could have autistic traits without actually being autistic. Maybe the way I was acting corresponded to the behaviour of someone on the spectrum. So I may have autistic traits, which is nothing to worry about, so the matter was settled.

Earlier this year, on another ABDL forum, a new thread was opened about the link between having the Asperger syndrome and being an ABDL. People said there were online tests and yesterday I decided to do a few of them. I already knew than online psychological tests are basically for funsies but the ones I did appear to be serious yet not real diagnoses of course.

So long story short, on the four tests I did, 3 of them said I am likely an aspie. One of them says that my score links to a 99 % chance of being one. The only test that gave me a more normal score was the one where I had to answer randomly due to the lack of an “I don’t know” option so it’s not accurate. Now I don’t know what to do with all this. Do I really want to know if I am an aspie? Yes, who wouldn’t? Do I need to know? There is no answer. The thing is, I can live normally. There are some difficult situations for me, that are also difficult for autistic people according to my readings, but they are really uncommon (there is one coming this monday). Should I seek professional help? Should I discuss about it with my parents? I need your help. Please ask for details if you need them to answer.

TL;DR: tests were positive and I don’t know what to do with the results
I was officially diagnosed as having Asperger's Syndrome at age 47 back in 2005.
 

Neonite

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In my opinion, what is most important here is finding what helps. Seeking an official assessment would be a good idea if having an official diagnosis would help, or if you require one to access accommodations you need. However, depending on your circumstances and location, getting a neuropsychological assessment can be difficult, expensive, or have long waiting lists. In the meantime it is important to understand that you are absolutely allowed to explore the idea and find support without necessarily having to already have a diagnosis.

There may be autism support groups in your area, and there are many supportive autistic communities online. Almost all of them are open to people questioning whether they are on the spectrum, and getting to know other autistic people can help shift the perception of it from some faraway scary concept to a normal thing that you experience and deal with day by day. You are allowed to identify yourself as autistic if it fits, and the very fact that you suspect it might fit is something worth paying attention to. Neurotypical people don't tend to wonder about these things very much, beyond slight whims that are forgotten within a few minutes.

It's also important to remember that autism being a spectrum is commonly misunderstood. It is less of a sliding scale from 'more' to 'less' autistic, it means that each individual symptom may be more or less pronounced for any given person. Sensory and social difficulties are not invalidated, for example, by not having much motor issues or explicit special interests. Ultimately, your needs are your own, and you are the expert in what helps and what does not. If something helps, you are allowed to use it.
 
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OldIron

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My ex tried to push me into seeing a psychologist due to the fact that I show quiet a few autistic traits, especially when it comes to social situations, so I did several of the legitimate looking tests. According to all of them, I am on the spectrum.
My solution, draw up a list of the traits that I show and then compare if they are a plus or a minus for my job. Turned out that they are a plus for my job(thankfully it's much more mechanical in nature and routine interactions with people I'm not always around tend to be for getting symptoms of broken equipment).

My advice to you would be to take the same approach. If the traits you show don't interfere with your life, is it really worth the hindrance that it could cause in life?
 
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