Diaper-friendly back pain solutions

TwoOfBraves

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Hey y’all! I have run into a problem while padding today, cause I’m an idiot: my lower back. I’ll spare the medical details, but I generally can’t sit in an office chair for more than 30 minutes without intense lower back pain. I usually solve this using an electric heating pad, but I’m a little worried about using a heating pad with a diaper.

My backup solution if I can’t use my heating pad is a Salonpas pain patch, but that’s not an option while in a nappy… I would rather not see what happens when pee and menthol interact!

If I can’t use either of those I have to basically max myself out on an ibuprofen/acetaminophen rotation and it doesn’t completely resolve the pain, so I would really prefer to use heat or something else if possible. Any ideas?
 

SoggyApril

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Depends of the source of the back pain a little.
I use a coccyx cussion on all office chairs I use because my tailbone specifically has issues.

If your issue is similar, a coccyx cussion might be a good investment.
 
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Cottontail

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TwoOfBraves said:
I’m a little worried about using a heating pad with a diaper.
What's your particular concern? Melted plastic? Pee + volts? Maybe I've been lucky, but I've never had an issue using a heating pad while wearing a diaper. I have scoliosis and related low/mid back pain. I'll often tuck a heating pad behind myself while sitting, though I recently got a standing desk and that's helped a lot also. I sometimes use products like Ben Gay and Flexall, but I apply them high enough on my back that they're not inside my diaper. I don't know what happens when you mix pee with those kinds of products, but I've applied them to warm/moist skin before (after stepping out of the shower or bath), and OUCH. Painful!

I really think you're ok with the pad.
 
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TwoOfBraves

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Cottontail said:
What's your particular concern? Melted plastic? Pee + volts? Maybe I've been lucky, but I've never had an issue using a heating pad while wearing a diaper. I have scoliosis and related low/mid back pain. I'll often tuck a heating pad behind myself while sitting, though I recently got a standing desk and that's helped a lot also. I sometimes use products like Ben Gay and Flexall, but I apply them high enough on my back that they're not inside my diaper. I don't know what happens when you mix pee with those kinds of products, but I've applied them to warm/moist skin before (after stepping out of the shower or bath), and OUCH. Painful!

I really think you're ok with the pad.

Oh, that’s a massive relief. Thank you!! Yeah, burned plastic was my main concern 😅 I’ve got dysplastic spondylolisthesis so sometimes my lower back just decides it’s time to end my life.

I’m lucky there’s a good variety of demographics here! I’m used to coming up with back pain solutions by myself so it’s nice to not be alone for once 🙂
 

diapeybabybrian

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You could consider modifying your desk to allow you to stand up for periods of time,

Quite simply, you put a device onto your desk which allows your entire workspace to "float",

Thereby allowing you to stand during times (when you are uncomfortable sitting.)

Then, when you want to sit down again, the desk lowers to a preferred height for a sitting position.

Most importantly, based on the Country you reside your Employer might even pay for this upgrade for you,

Worst case scenario they refuse and it will cost you between 300 to 1,000+ dollars.
 

Cottontail

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TwoOfBraves said:
Oh, that’s a massive relief. Thank you!! Yeah, burned plastic was my main concern 😅 I’ve got dysplastic spondylolisthesis so sometimes my lower back just decides it’s time to end my life.
Aiee. Sorry to hear it.

Heating pads are great—so versatile! I used mine to help thaw a frozen water pipe last week. :)
 
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Teddy02

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I too suffer with back pain. I had a hip replaced 12 years ago and it has always been painful. … except that I recently saw a hip surgeon who was to first to say that it was not the hip but my back!! L4/5 to be precise where the nerve passes through the small hole in the vertebra, it has become smaller with bony build-up. They will ream it out but the back surgeon says it is not bad enough yet, so they gave me a steroid injection into L4 and the pain disappeared. That was five months ago and while it has come back a little it can be handled with paracetamol.
Please, please do not take too many ibuprofen … I did this some years ago and it gave me tinnitus. This is a horrible drug that I think is overrated. There is a warning on the package to that effect. We have a commercial anti-inflamatory gel called Voltaren/Volterol. It has dyclofenac in it and I find it works very well. Just apply it (rub it in) for a couple of minutes and let it dry. I do it at night if I have done a lot of gardening etc.
 

TwoOfBraves

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Teddy02 said:
Please, please do not take too many ibuprofen … I did this some years ago and it gave me tinnitus. This is a horrible drug that I think is overrated. There is a warning on the package to that effect. We have a commercial anti-inflamatory gel called Voltaren/Volterol. It has dyclofenac in it and I find it works very well. Just apply it (rub it in) for a couple of minutes and let it dry. I do it at night if I have done a lot of gardening etc.
Yeah, you gotta be careful with oral meds! It’s easy to take too many or take them too frequently, and sometimes ADR’s are inevitable (thankfully I haven’t had any to nsaids yet).

I didn’t know diclofenac was used for pain relief gel! I actually work with the stuff on a daily basis (it’s one of the nsaid eye drops our doctors prescribe for cataract surgery) but I had no idea about its other uses! I’ll see if I can give it a shot.
 
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Joediaper

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Teddy02 said:
Please, please do not take too many ibuprofen … I did this some years ago and it gave me tinnitus. This is a horrible drug that I think is overrated.
All NSAID's are in this category. Acetaminophen (Tylenol), naproxen sodium (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin). They can be extremely dangerous when taken in even small doses for extended periods.

I have had the displeasure of the kind of back pain you and Cottontail have. It's an absolute nightmare when you wake up and simply can't move because of pain. As such I have seen more than a few doctors and physical therapists about it and even been through neck and back surgery. The one thing they have all told me...

Never ever use heat to treat back or neck pain!

Ice is the way to go. Reason is the pain is coming from inflammation and heat increases blood flow which will increase inflammation. This can cause even more pressure on the nerve bundle and could possibly cause permanent damage over time. If you ice it you will reduce the inflammation and reduce the pressure on the nerves being pinched. Rule of thumb is 20 minutes at a time with a 10 minute break for to or three rounds.

If ice can't manage the pain and you find yourself diving for more NSAID's I recommend finding a good neurosurgeon. Current surgical methods are much much safer than even 10 years ago and use far less hardware than ever before. Yes surgery is expensive and super scary but I'm really glad I took the chance at it. My lumbar is doing fantastic and my neck is recovering nicely.
 
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Teddy02

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Joediaper said:
All NSAID's are in this category. Acetaminophen (Tylenol), naproxen sodium (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin). They can be extremely dangerous when taken in even small doses for extended periods.

I have had the displeasure of the kind of back pain you and Cottontail have. It's an absolute nightmare when you wake up and simply can't move because of pain. As such I have seen more than a few doctors and physical therapists about it and even been through neck and back surgery. The one thing they have all told me...

Never ever use heat to treat back or neck pain!

Ice is the way to go. Reason is the pain is coming from inflammation and heat increases blood flow which will increase inflammation. This can cause even more pressure on the nerve bundle and could possibly cause permanent damage over time. If you ice it you will reduce the inflammation and reduce the pressure on the nerves being pinched. Rule of thumb is 20 minutes at a time with a 10 minute break for to or three rounds.

If ice can't manage the pain and you find yourself diving for more NSAID's I recommend finding a good neurosurgeon. Current surgical methods are much much safer than even 10 years ago and use far less hardware than ever before. Yes surgery is expensive and super scary but I'm really glad I took the chance at it. My lumbar is doing fantastic and my neck is recovering nicely.
I think that as Voltaren/Volterol (diclofenac gell) is applied topically it is not absorbed into the body as much as the pills, I have found it very good, so much so that surgery has been posponed. I cannot take the pills as I am on blood pressure meds, although they did say that a very occasional neurofen would be ok. The neurosurgeon I saw is brilliant, he operated on a brain tumour on my wife and she is fine!!! When the time comes I will go back to him for the operation. Meanwhile ice and exercise are working well.
 
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TwoOfBraves

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It seems like there’s a bit of misinformation going around, so hopefully I can clear things up a little if y’all don’t mind. To preface, I’m a medical assistant! I have spent… far too many hours of my life on this kind of stuff.

Joediaper said:
All NSAID's are in this category. Acetaminophen (Tylenol), naproxen sodium (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin). They can be extremely dangerous when taken in even small doses for extended periods.
First off, just a quick disclaimer- acetaminophen isn’t an NSAID, just a pain reliever! That’s why you can take Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen in rotation.

Diclofenac is actually also an NSAID, though it’s usually taken topically instead of orally. Topical medications tend to have a bit of a lower risk for ADR’s, and in some cases don’t even necessarily go systemic.

A quick explanation of ADR’s as well… ADR’s (adverse reactions)- sometimes, people experience negative side effects from a drug, which we call an adverse reaction (it may also be labeled as a drug allergy, but adr’s vs drug allergies is a whooooole semantic debate that I’m not here to settle). Sometimes when someone has an adverse reaction to a drug it’s just to that drug; other times, it’s to all drugs in that category. What Teddy described earlier…
Teddy02 said:
Please, please do not take too many ibuprofen … I did this some years ago and it gave me tinnitus. This is a horrible drug that I think is overrated.
…Is an ADR to ibuprofen. Since they’re using diclofenac topical gel with no problems though, we can tell they don’t have an allergy to all NSAIDs.

Sometimes, though, the allergy does pertain to the whole category, which affects what you can and can’t use. The reaction you have will affect what a doctor is willing to prescribe you as well. For example, Teddy’s reaction to ibuprofen had been something like anaphylaxis, their doctor would likely make sure they never went near diclofenac for any reason whatsoever. But a reaction of tinnitus is not only pretty mild, but also unlikely to occur with a topical gel.

Medication risks and effectiveness are also affected by your health conditions and any other medications you’re on. For example, NSAIDs like ibuprofen can act affect your clotting rate, while some painkillers such as aspirin are straight blood thinners. So if you have any conditions that would make blood thinners risky, or if you’re already on a heavy duty anticoagulant such Warfarin or Eliquis, your doctor might instruct you to steer clear of those.

And a lot of different medications can interact with each other! For example, NSAIDs have noted interactions with corticosteroids, beta blockers, and diuretics, among others. But these interactions and the risks they pose depend on what dosage you’re taking of each, for how long you need to take them, how you’re taking them (oral/topical/etc), other medications you’re taking, any prior adr’s, your medical history, etc. All of those factors are weighed by your doctor when they decide what medications to recommend!

All this is to say: everyone is different. Just because you personally had an adverse reaction to a medication, or it would be unsafe for you personally to use, does not make it an inherently bad or dangerous medication!

PLEASE talk to your doctor before making any decisions or judgements on your medications. What works for you might be dangerous for someone else, and something you’ve had bad experiences with may be life-saving to others!

(P.S… This is also why it’s really important to give a complete and accurate medical history/medication list when asked to by a healthcare professional! We ask for a reason. 😉)
 

Belarin

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Just a quick reply while on break, I'm not sure about the pads but if heat works for you you could try capsaicin cream.

I use this stuff as a spanking alternative, but it is designed for rheumatism, arthritis and joint pains, I have used it for back pain in the past and it did the job, is fine to use with diapers but use small amounts to begin as it can feel quite hot.

Axcain I believe is one of the brands you can get over the counter, but there is a stronger one you can get on prescription.
 

Chrissie

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For me, a simple covered hot water bottle helps ease my back pain when sitting. I hope you find the right solution.
 

Teddy02

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TwoOfBraves said:
It seems like there’s a bit of misinformation going around, so hopefully I can clear things up a little if y’all don’t mind. To preface, I’m a medical assistant! I have spent… far too many hours of my life on this kind of stuff.


First off, just a quick disclaimer- acetaminophen isn’t an NSAID, just a pain reliever! That’s why you can take Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen in rotation.

Diclofenac is actually also an NSAID, though it’s usually taken topically instead of orally. Topical medications tend to have a bit of a lower risk for ADR’s, and in some cases don’t even necessarily go systemic.

A quick explanation of ADR’s as well… ADR’s (adverse reactions)- sometimes, people experience negative side effects from a drug, which we call an adverse reaction (it may also be labeled as a drug allergy, but adr’s vs drug allergies is a whooooole semantic debate that I’m not here to settle). Sometimes when someone has an adverse reaction to a drug it’s just to that drug; other times, it’s to all drugs in that category. What Teddy described earlier…

…Is an ADR to ibuprofen. Since they’re using diclofenac topical gel with no problems though, we can tell they don’t have an allergy to all NSAIDs.

Sometimes, though, the allergy does pertain to the whole category, which affects what you can and can’t use. The reaction you have will affect what a doctor is willing to prescribe you as well. For example, Teddy’s reaction to ibuprofen had been something like anaphylaxis, their doctor would likely make sure they never went near diclofenac for any reason whatsoever. But a reaction of tinnitus is not only pretty mild, but also unlikely to occur with a topical gel.

Medication risks and effectiveness are also affected by your health conditions and any other medications you’re on. For example, NSAIDs like ibuprofen can act affect your clotting rate, while some painkillers such as aspirin are straight blood thinners. So if you have any conditions that would make blood thinners risky, or if you’re already on a heavy duty anticoagulant such Warfarin or Eliquis, your doctor might instruct you to steer clear of those.

And a lot of different medications can interact with each other! For example, NSAIDs have noted interactions with corticosteroids, beta blockers, and diuretics, among others. But these interactions and the risks they pose depend on what dosage you’re taking of each, for how long you need to take them, how you’re taking them (oral/topical/etc), other medications you’re taking, any prior adr’s, your medical history, etc. All of those factors are weighed by your doctor when they decide what medications to recommend!

All this is to say: everyone is different. Just because you personally had an adverse reaction to a medication, or it would be unsafe for you personally to use, does not make it an inherently bad or dangerous medication!

PLEASE talk to your doctor before making any decisions or judgements on your medications. What works for you might be dangerous for someone else, and something you’ve had bad experiences with may be life-saving to others!

(P.S… This is also why it’s really important to give a complete and accurate medical history/medication list when asked to by a healthcare professional! We ask for a reason. 😉)
Thank you for the fulsome response to my post. At the time (about ten years ago) I was taking ibuprofen for back pain and headaches. I had no tinnitus at all. Then one day I woke up with it, very loud and very intrusive. I looked on the paper that accompanies the pills and it says that tinnitus is one of the possible side effects. I did not read it first, my own fault. I have now had tinnitus ever since. I listen to a lot of music and have very good hearing but the quiet passages of a track it becomes very loud. I saw an audiologist/ent surgeon who basically said ‘get used to it, there is nothing to be done about it‘. I cannot take any NSAID now as I am on blood pressure pills and they conflict, but the gel has no effect on the tinnitus and works well for back pain. I do wonder how many people read the information, especially the ‘side effects’ information in the pill packet though? As you rightly say ‘we are all different’. Happy days.
 

LePew

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I have back pain from an injury that can get really bad from sitting in an office chair - which I do 8 hours per day at work and then do some more of when I come home. So - what I’d like to recommend is a really good chair, like the best ergonomic chair you can buy.

I would highly recommend the Herman Miller Aeron Chair, which is a $1500 chair that has tons of aftermarket and used market support. Don’t worry, I can’t afford that either! You can buy them used for $250-$350 and they’re well worth it! They can easily last 25 years and companies basically just liquidate them after 5-8 years. Be aware they they come in 3 sizes and it’s important to find the right size for you. I’ve got 2 of them - one at home and one at the office and they are a back saver!
Also - quick tip: locking the tilt mechanism in the chair helps prevent back pain too.

I max out my cars heated seats all the time in a diaper and never had an issue.
 
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