Confession.

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LittleJess

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I don't vote, nor do I care about politics, period.

That being said, I don't vote, nor do I care about politics, that being said it seems that politics and religion seem to rule peoples lives, while honestly I see voting as pointless, usually you have two or three idiots who how do I explain this, have ideals that half the people agree or disagree with. They never seem to change much, and along the lines the other party wins fucking everything up even more. It's one step forward, two steps back from what I can see.

One politician for example would target the poor and health care, anti-gay community whatever the usual crap is, the other will target the rich bastards etc and usually this causes "heat" between people who have two different political views.

Long story short, doesn't matter who you vote for, you're fucked anyway, personally with me if you want to see change, get off your bum and protest, to me it's literally watching a bunch of idiots arguing about a topic they don't understand, like fucking Hollywood gossip.

That being said, some people like to try and "put you in a group" lets say you are for gay marriage, some idiot would tell you, that you are (group X) Meanwhile I'm along the lines of not giving a shit, I'm a rational person, I'm not picking person X cause they say one thing I might agree with, nor does that make me that political group. If a serial killer tells me I'm beautiful I'm not gonna fucking worship him.

Than you always have two or three idiots, who turn everything into a political argument on things you literally cannot "pick", I've seen people do this with evolution, and climate change. oh that's what the liberals want you to think, no it's scientific fact you idiot, nothing to do with god damn politics. [pun intended]

You usually see that on Facebook, or between a group of people who are bellow average intelligence.

Ok, this is more of a confession / rant.
 

MagicMeow

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If we were to compare both societies from 1500 or so years ago with those of today, while we still have a ways to go, the quality of life for the average person has improved.




the process in which a population chooses its government, and the laws and behaviors expected from its populace has a point, and its the growth of our civilization, slowly but surely.
 
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Starrunner

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I don't vote, nor do I care about politics, period.

That being said, I don't vote, nor do I care about politics, that being said it seems that politics and religion seem to rule peoples lives, while honestly I see voting as pointless, usually you have two or three idiots who how do I explain this, have ideals that half the people agree or disagree with. They never seem to change much, and along the lines the other party wins fucking everything up even more. It's one step forward, two steps back from what I can see.

One politician for example would target the poor and health care, anti-gay community whatever the usual crap is, the other will target the rich bastards etc and usually this causes "heat" between people who have two different political views.

Long story short, doesn't matter who you vote for, you're fucked anyway, personally with me if you want to see change, get off your bum and protest, to me it's literally watching a bunch of idiots arguing about a topic they don't understand, like fucking Hollywood gossip.

That being said, some people like to try and "put you in a group" lets say you are for gay marriage, some idiot would tell you, that you are (group X) Meanwhile I'm along the lines of not giving a shit, I'm a rational person, I'm not picking person X cause they say one thing I might agree with, nor does that make me that political group. If a serial killer tells me I'm beautiful I'm not gonna fucking worship him.

Than you always have two or three idiots, who turn everything into a political argument on things you literally cannot "pick", I've seen people do this with evolution, and climate change. oh that's what the liberals want you to think, no it's scientific fact you idiot, nothing to do with god damn politics. [pun intended]

You usually see that on Facebook, or between a group of people who are bellow average intelligence.

Ok, this is more of a confession / rant.


Just my thoughts on this:

I tend to disagree. I have spent decades working on political elections and certainly we've had our ups and downs and wins and losses. There's a danger when you think that all parties are the same, simply because each party responds to its own membership and the platforms can change radically over time. Ignore them at your own peril.

In our provincial election in 1995, our most progressive government was soundly defeated by the Conservative party of the day. It was a complete thrashing which decimated our party. The incoming conservative government won the election by taking an unprecedented hard shift to the right, demonizing the poor as being lazy and a drain on the public purse, campaigning to radically reduce welfare payments, selling off subsidized housing and replacing job programs with mean-spirited workforce programs to provide free labour to business.

As someone working to help people in poverty, the prospect of having this government in power terrified me. I had always been critical of my friends and acquaintances who didn't bother to exercise their right to vote because they believed that 'all parties are the same.' However, after this particular government got elected, for the first time in my life I found myself wanting to believe they were right. I actually wanted to believe that the incoming government would not be any different than the previous ones and that they would not carry out their inhumane campaign promises. If only that were so. They carried out their extremist agenda by cutting welfare rates, canceling housing options, and eliminating rent controls on affordable apartments usually occupied by the poor. The result was that the rate of homelessness increased by more than 30% just several months after they implemented their policies. The shelters and streets filled up with homeless individuals and families who no longer had the means to pay their rent. The money saved on welfare and disability costs went to pay for tax cuts for the upper class.

I do believe that some governments can be more destructive than others and that complacency is our own worst enemy. There are always political opportunists waiting for a suitable climate to spout rhetoric and hatred against the poor, against women, gays or immigrants. If we stop fighting, then we let them win. To say that voting won't make a difference allows them to win. While voting for the 'lesser of two evils' is not the most desirable option, you still need to vote for the lesser of two evils, while asking yourself 'What I can I do to change the system to prevent such evil from rising to the top?' It starts with you, and me, and every person who is eligible to vote. The only thing that is guaranteed in any election is that someone is going to get elected whether you vote for them or not, so it's important to cast your vote even if it's a protest vote, it's still better than just staying home on voting day.

I'm not saying voting is the only thing we can be doing, just that it's a fundamental right in any democracy and the most effective way to cast judgement on governments. Throughout the decades I've been involved in advocating for housing issues as they affect people with low incomes. There's a public education component to my work in addition to political action. I certainly agree there's a lot of effective work that can be done by working 'outside the system' to influence policy and campaign platforms. I am heartened by the actions of the Occupy movement, the environmental coalitions, the LGBT demonstrations, anti-poverty groups, and the anti-racist groups, all of which have been effective agitators in advancing their rights while combatting misinformed and ignorant stereotypes and rhetoric. However, most individuals involved in protests and demonstrations participate in them not as an alternative to voting, but rather as a way to bring attention to their causes in order to influence the popular vote.

I've been aware of how politics can have a direct impact on the lives of the people I try to help every day. I've been involved in advocacy work to help the poor for what seems like a lifetime. I have been disappointed with the outcomes more often than I have been exhilarated by our successes. Statistically, poor people don't tend to vote, and the result is that the political parties pay very little attention to poverty issues. But when we stop fighting for the fair treatment of all members in our society, when we stop exercising our democratic right to vote, then there will always be political parties just waiting to capitalize on it. Sometimes it feels like we're standing on a cliff, barely preventing those politicians from pushing our weakest members off of it, but if we don't stand in their way, then they will get pushed off.

I've never believed that simply voting is representative of the total work required to achieve success in a social movement. It takes passion and conviction, it takes protest, it takes organization through social media, sometimes it takes civil disobedience, it takes memberships to the NGO's and non-profits, and volunteer work. And if you find a political party doesn't represent everything you believe in, then take out a membership so that you can influence and change policy from within.


Throughout my years working in the field of advocacy I have had friends, colleagues and acquaintances from all walks of life who were frustrated with the political system. I have seen tremendous energy and enthusiasm as they dedicated themselves to protest movements, civil disobedience, non-profit advocacy groups, and people running for political office. I believe there is a place in our society for all of these perspectives to coexist, separately and collectively to influence change and policy. There's a lot to be said for choosing to work outside the system in spite of the fact that you are considered to be an outsider. When you sign up to be a politician you are bound by the rules and beliefs of the party and expected to tow the party line. When you work in social movements, you can be true to the movement because the movement doesn't compromise its beliefs to satisfy a political party. However the goal of most movements is to influence the process in order to achieve better electoral outcomes, not to persuade people to refrain from voting.
 
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dogboy

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I can't improve on what Starrunner has said. Governments impact on all of our lives in various ways. All three of our kids and several of their spouses are all involved in public funded education. For that reason we've usually voted for the Democratic party because they have been more supportive. The Republican party wants more charter schools and vouchers. The thought behind Charter Schools is that government would take much needed money for public schools and re-direct it to charter and private schools. So we protect our jobs by voting Democratic.

I use that merely as an example as to how people vote. They typically vote for a candidate or a party that best represents their interests. Of course, that doesn't always work out because politicians will tell any sort of lie to get elected. Still, it's better to vote for the person who you think you'll have a better chance of survival with.

I dearly hope this thread will not digress into a discussion about charter schools. I merely used it as a personal example.
 
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