Cloth diaper questions.

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AbbeyJunction

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First of all. before i even start. What is more absorbant?
A cloth or disposable diaper?

okies. now a few questions about this stuff.

1. What is the difference between "flannel", "gauze", and "birdseye" cloth diapers?

2. whats the difference between night-time and day time? (im assuming thickness and absorbancy)

3. Whats the difference between pre fold, flat, and conture cloth diapers?

Thanks for the info ^^
and i couldnt find anything in the wiki about cloth diapers..
 

dogboy

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Flannel is a little more like towel material. I've never used it, but it's soft, but probably not as absorbent as gauze and birdseye. Gauze and birdseye are similar. I think birdseye is supposed to be a little more absorbant than gauze, and may get softer when washed, but can wear out sooner. I think it's birdseye I am using, I get them confused.

I've switched to night time because they are a lot thicker, and since I like to wear to bed, I'm less worried about leaks. I use the Altogether Diaper Co. diapers, and really like them.

I use prefold because I can pin the corners and I'm done. Flat you have to fold a number of ways and make a triangle. I have some contour, and they're good for the day, but there isn't as much surface area to absorb.

As for which would absorb more, disposable or cloth, I don't know, but I can go all night in my night time cloth diaper. You of course will need plastic pants. I us the high backs from Amazon.com. They're great. I wear small as they are tight enough to prevent leaks. Good luck.
 
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I actually learned a lot in that post too dogboy! So thanks!

Despite my decade of expeirance I never tried cloth and do not feel compelled to unless I get the chance easily.
 

MysteriousVisitor

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I was thinking of making a cloth diaper thread, but this fortunately came up.

I'm thinking of getting some cloth diapers myself. Can anyone give recommendations for an all in one diaper from a company that ships discreetly?
 

ShyBaby

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Double-sided terry toweling is commonly available in larger fabric shops on a 1.6m roll, so if you want to try an 'old school', fold-your-own cloth diaper, grab a length of that, cut it into a square and find the biggest safety pins you can. Granted it will fray if you don't hem it, but that takes a while.
 
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First of all. before i even start. What is more absorbant?
A cloth or disposable diaper?

okies. now a few questions about this stuff.

1. What is the difference between "flannel", "gauze", and "birdseye" cloth diapers?
Dogboy was close, but not quite right.
Terry cloth diapers, much more popular in the UK (I believe) are like the towels that you have in bathroom.
Flannel is a smooth cotton material, often used in bedsheets, and pajamas.
Gauze is a loose weave cotton often used in bandages.
Birdseye is a specific weave similar to gauze.

2. whats the difference between night-time and day time? (im assuming thickness and absorbancy)
Night time usually have two more inner layers of absorbent material, so are thicker and more absorbent.

3. Whats the difference between pre fold, flat, and conture cloth diapers?
Pre-fold are generally rectangular with extra layers in the middle looking something like this -=-, although it is usually a 2-4-2 pattern, they require a minimum of folding to be made to fit.

Flat are usually square, either 1 or 2 layers and need to folded in one of many patterns to be made so they fit.

Contour diapers are cut to shape like a disposable, they have central soaker pad like the prefolds, but are even easier to put on.


Thanks for the info ^^
and i couldnt find anything in the wiki about cloth diapers..
You're welcome and I hope this helps.
 

Peachy

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If you're going for cloth diapers, I would suggest to buy a normal cotton sheet, or a baby cloth diaper. Baby cloth diapers come in 40x40 cm here (that's roughly 15 inches each side) and they're available in most baby stores. Some online sellers also sell those simple absorbent sheets in 80x80 cm (roughly 31 inches).
Add a sheet like that as the layer directly touching your skin. This has several advantages:
(1) You can wash that sheet separately and without any chemical substances (like bleach). Make sure it's white so you can was it at the highest temperature. That way, your skin won't come in contact with the proper cloth diaper, which you may decide to wash with chemical substances (bleach etc.). Less chances of getting a rash.
(2) Any stains you may leave will be confined to that cotton sheet. I.e. should you have a messy accident (either by choice or as a real accident), or should you have forgotten to wipe well, you'll only have to replace the top sheet and your real cloth diaper will remain unstained.

Peachy
 
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First of all. before i even start. What is more absorbant?
A cloth or disposable diaper?

The higher end disposables are more absorbant than cloth. Cloth diapers only have the padding to soak up moisture.
The gel in an X-plus type diaper soaks up a lot of moisture and since its not liquid anymore it cannot leak, only after the gel has absorbed its maximum amount, will there be any chance of leaking.
Of course, if you have enough cloth layers you can increase the absorbancy, but you might not be able to walk.
 
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Well, I have a limited amount of experience with disposable diapers, I only used them for a year and a half or less, but I've tried several brands to see if they would work for me. But my problem was that I would get a rash from sweating so much in them. When I switched to cloth, that problem went away.

I use gauze cloth myself, fron AdultClothDiaperCo., and their plastic pants too. I did try one flannel diaper on my last purchase a month or two ago, but I'm still trying to assess it's worthiness. I use only the night time cloth, even for daytime, as I have a large bladder and no control. One night time during the day is fine when I use a stuffer and a liner. At night, I triple up on them so I don't have any leakage problems. I almost ruined my chair from leaking when I was using disposables, and then from the cloth when I wasn't using enough material at first.

I also have no bowel control, and when I'm cleaning up in the shower, I'll hose off the cloth diaper in there after I remove the heaviest part of the mess, and I must say that the night time cloth will hold a huge amount of water.

The trick to keeping from leaking is a good pair of plastic pants. Cloth diapers will "wick" the moisture into whatever they happen to touch, and if your plastic pants don't cover all of it, that's what will happen. Basically, the plastic just keeps the cloth from touching anything else, they really can't stop a leak if you overload a cloth diaper, but before you ever get to that point, you'll know it.

As for diaper pins, I've found that the ones at a place called "Joanne's" I think it's spelled, has some called Skirt pins, that work really well for this. They are much thicker material than the ones ADC sells, and a lot stronger. But be sure to get the brass colored ones, as they will not rust. The stainless ones aren't really stainless and will rust on you and stain your diapers. I learned that the hard way.

Oh, one last thing, the price. Cloth dipes are going to cost you a large amount right up front, but in the long run, they'll cost you far less than the disposables, and they are more eco-friendly. I have to wear them 24/7/365, so it's cheaper for me to use these. I buy the extra large size, and if my memory serves, they were about $28.00 or $29.00 each. If you don't use bleach on them, {it eats cloth really bad, guess how I found that out!}, they will last you for a couple of years, depending on how many you have and how often you use them. I initially started with 8 of them for a year, and then I began to buy them a dozen at a time. You get a discount on them if you buy them in lots of 3, or more in lots of 6, over the individual price. I've still got some of the first ones, they're a bit raggedy, but they make excellent liners or stuffers. I let them get all stained up and save the newer ones that way.

I hope this helps you make up your mind.
 

Honeywell6180

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First of all. before i even start. What is more absorbant?
A cloth or disposable diaper?

okies. now a few questions about this stuff.

1. What is the difference between "flannel", "gauze", and "birdseye" cloth diapers?
Gauze diapers are usually a twill weave, similar to denim but of a much softer cotton. Birdseye is woven into a diamond pattern, and you can tell by looking at the diaper at an angle. Birdseye has a textured side, and a smooth side as well. Flannel is similar to what one would find in pajamas, or some blankets. It is woven into a muslin (or tight square pattern) like some gauze diapers, only it is thicker and has a pile to it.

2. whats the difference between night-time and day time? (im assuming thickness and absorbancy)
Night time has more absorbency, and is thus thicker. The Alltogether Diaper Company usually adds an extra layer of terri cloth in the middle, as opposed to their day-weight diaper, for example. Also, their gauze flat folds have two layers in the day weight, and four for the night, with no terri center panel.

3. Whats the difference between pre fold, flat, and conture cloth diapers?
A prefold is retangular in shape, but has a center panel that is thicker in the center than the outer panels. You can tell a pre-fold by looking at a package of Gerber diapers at Target, where you will see the stitching that holds the center panel in place. Flat folds are either rectangular or square in shape and cover a larger area until folded. They have one or more uniform layers across the whole span, with no sewn in center panel. Contour diapers are similar to disposables, in that they are designed anatomically and are typically an hourglass shape. Some have elastic at the leg openings, but some don't.

Thanks for the info ^^
and i couldnt find anything in the wiki about cloth diapers..
Not as much is known about cloth diapers as disposables. Fewer people use them these days, for their intended purpose. However, they do have a following among some adults and parents who want a more "natural" approach towards caregiving.

You also asked about absorbency in cloth compared to disposable. Cloth diapers can be layered for added capacity, and thus can hold more than any disposable. However, there is a trade-off in the increased thickness of the cloth diaper, as opposed to the disposable. On the other hand, a disposable like the Abena X-Plus, Secure X-Plus, Molicare, or Dry 24/7 will usually have adequate retention without the added bulk.

Honeywell6180
 
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Honeywell6180

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Fire lupine06: Adult pull-on cloth diapers and are of the same material and design as a child's training pant. I believe Babykins has them available under their "Kins" line. Keep in mind that re-usable training pants will have more coverage than disposables like Pull-ups or Pampers Easy-Ups. And they will obviously be thicker. Some of them are an "all in one" type, with a nylon or plastic outer backing while others require plastic pants. I hope this helps.

Honeywell6180
 
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You also asked about absorbency in cloth compared to disposable. Cloth diapers can be layered for added capacity, and thus can hold more than any disposable. However, there is a trade-off in the increased thickness of the cloth diaper, as opposed to the disposable. On the other hand, a disposable like the Abena X-Plus, Secure X-Plus, Molicare, or Dry 24/7 will usually have adequate retention without the added bulk.

Honeywell6180
Yes, I can vouch for how much a cloth diaper will hold. Whenever I have a messy accident and I'm at home, I'll shower to clean up, and I take the diaper into the shower as well to clean it off with the shower head on the massage, or more direct spray. Once it's cleaned off, I shut off the shower for a moment to wring it out, and it's just amazing to me how much water comes out of it. I know that you would never ever get one that wet while wearing it, but if you had to, at least you'll know it's possible.
 
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