Canada Crossing Issues?

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JOCKMAN

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I ran a search on crossing the border and found one thread from 2009 with some good advice but was wondering if anyone has driven across the Canadian border within the last year while wearing undergarment protection. Any problems? Yes, I know it is not illegal, but wonder if any scanners or other devices (pat downs?) made the bulk-wearing suspicious until the agents confirmed the diapers / plastic underpants / other incontinent items.
 
Well, I haven't crossed since 9/11, but back then they just searched your vehicle and didn't even touch you.
 
There's no issue crossing the boarder either way when you drive, even if you get pulled over for secondary inspection they won't search you unless you give them a valid resion to.

I have crossed the boarder wearing diaper in the past both to and from Canada with no issue.
 
I'm assuming you're driving, since airports and security have been discussed at length. If you are flying, just don't wet your diaper prior to going through security.

At driving border security, I can't imagine that you'd have a problem. People in wheelchairs or with other disabilities drive between Canada and the US. They just care that you're not smuggling anything, so don't do that. :)
 
I'm assuming you're driving, since airports and security have been discussed at length. If you are flying, just don't wet your diaper prior to going through security.

At driving border security, I can't imagine that you'd have a problem. People in wheelchairs or with other disabilities drive between Canada and the US. They just care that you're not smuggling anything, so don't do that. :)

Regarding a wet diaper - what are you trying to do smuggle nitro-glycerine and one upmanship the 'Underwear bomber" ?
Certainly you are not going to wear baby booties to put one over on the 'Shoe bomber' !

Diapers are their least concern - the Canadian authorities are more concerned with firearms drugs and too many fish over the limits !
That and if you are driving and have one of dem radar detector devices - WHOA - that be a capital felony of sorts interfering with their
sovereign rights to monitor your speed ! So speed not in your diapers - use them for what they are there for a portable potty pit stop !

Well if the authorities at the border have not seen it all - they certainly will when johnny come diaper wearing crosses - although they
might just want you to change into a clean new diaper - would not want a source of portable pollution crossing the borders !

So just relax it is business as usual - diapered criminals are not in high demand !
 
They don't care, really, are you ever gonna see that Mountie again in your life?
 
Regarding a wet diaper - what are you trying to do smuggle nitro-glycerine and one upmanship the 'Underwear bomber" ?
Certainly you are not going to wear baby booties to put one over on the 'Shoe bomber' !

At an airport that's more of a problem. They probably really don't care if you try to smuggle a bomb in your pants over the border, what are you going to to, blow up your own pickup truck?
 
I never had issues at the airport or the Canadian border, but I do tell them if I need a body scan that I wear diapers.
 
I've never had any problems crossing the border(into the US) when wearing diapers, nor have I had any problems returning to Canada.
 
I've never been wearing a diaper when crossing, but I've had my luggage searched twice when crossing, and had plenty of Bambinos in them. The kind with fun prints.

They don't really care. They're just there to make sure things like firearms and drugs don't make it through. I'm pretty sure they've seen far odder things than baby-printed adult diapers.

I've never been patted down or personally searched or anything like that. I've always been pretty cooperative too, though.
 
Crossing the border in a car is pretty easy. They're not going to make you even get out of the car in most cases. If you're going into Canada, remember there's a fair chance you'll get someone that speaks French as a first language and barely speaks English (despite the fact they're supposed to be fluent at the border. I went round and round with someone like that until I figured out that Green Paper meant the registration for my car). Usually, they'll ask you general questions about where you're from, where you're headed, for how long, whether you're bringing any firearms, alcohol, or tobacco into the country, and a few other things. Keep calm, answer succinctly, and you'll be fine. The Canadian guards generally are much much friendlier than are the U.S. guards, as a heads-up for your return trip. They might ask you to cut off the engine and open the trunk, at which point they might paw around your bags a bit. Only if you seem really nervous or are otherwise acting odd, or they find something they don't like, will they order you for additional screening.

The worst that happens is that they reject you entry into Canada (unless you're actively trying to break the law by smuggling drugs or something) and send you back. If that happens, explain what happened to the U.S. guard and they shouldn't give you too many bumps.

Back in 2008 or so, I went to a big diaper fest in Vermont by way of Canada. I had a case of Bambinos, my stroller, bags full of ABDL clothes and gear, and my steel spiked collar. I was going to drive half the trip, sleep in my car at a rest stop, then finish the drive the next day. I hit the border in Windsor at about 7:00. Apparently my nerves over the trip and crossing the border and everything else made them suspicious, so off to secondary screening I went.

They pawed around a bit, until they found the pacis in my bag. That made them think drugs, and off they went. They disassembled my car. Three hours later, the contents of my car, two of the four chairs, and some of the interior panels were spread across two parking spots in the secondary screening area. They considered the spikes on my collar to be weapons, and they found a set of lockpicks I had lost months before (they were in the overhead compartment all the way to the back behind a sunglass case, apparently).

Of course, I felt like I was going to die of embarrassment! They must have picked up on that, and at the end of it all, one of the guards said to me, "You know, we don't care what you do in your private time. We're federal agents at the busiest border crossing in Canada, and we have way too much stuff to do to worry about your private life. As long as you're straight up with us, we don't care."

And that was it. I probably gave them a story for the ages, but they actually helped me put my car back together and were courteous and very professional. They did refuse me entry, as apparently lockpicks are illegal to possess in Canada and they thought the collar could be used as a weapon. Before I could leave, though, I had to go to the immigration office, where they grilled me about my job, whether I was trying to get into Canada to work illegally, my finances, how much money I had in my bank accounts (since I had $8 in cash on me), and a bunch of other crap. After I finally convinced them I was just passing through, not trying to start a business in Canada without a work permit, I went home, dumped the oddball stuff off, got some sleep, and went back the next day. After a brief stint in secondary screening (they didn't search the car, just asked me a bunch of immigration stuff), I was finally on my way.

I've crossed the border numerous times since then without much problem. About the closest I got to a problem was the episode last year with the French guy that kept harassing me about my green paper. It turned out he didn't like the temporary tag on my new car and didn't speak enough English to competently ask me for the registration. After going round and round with him and figuring out he was on about the car, I handed him the whole stack of paperwork from the dealership, my registration, and proof of insurance, and he finally figured it out and left me alone.
 
Crossing the border is, as a matter of course, a fairly pedestrian affair. Don't bring weapons, don't bring drugs, act civilized with the border agent and don't give them cause to think you don't intent to go back. The rest they don't care about.

Oh, and don't have a DUI or a felony on your record (God help you if you have a felony DUI). And don't lie. Border agent types don't like liars.
 
Crossing the border in a car is pretty easy. They're not going to make you even get out of the car in most cases. If you're going into Canada, remember there's a fair chance you'll get someone that speaks French as a first language and barely speaks English (despite the fact they're supposed to be fluent at the border. I went round and round with someone like that until I figured out that Green Paper meant the registration for my car). Usually, they'll ask you general questions about where you're from, where you're headed, for how long, whether you're bringing any firearms, alcohol, or tobacco into the country, and a few other things. Keep calm, answer succinctly, and you'll be fine. The Canadian guards generally are much much friendlier than are the U.S. guards, as a heads-up for your return trip. They might ask you to cut off the engine and open the trunk, at which point they might paw around your bags a bit. Only if you seem really nervous or are otherwise acting odd, or they find something they don't like, will they order you for additional screening.

The worst that happens is that they reject you entry into Canada (unless you're actively trying to break the law by smuggling drugs or something) and send you back. If that happens, explain what happened to the U.S. guard and they shouldn't give you too many bumps.

Back in 2008 or so, I went to a big diaper fest in Vermont by way of Canada. I had a case of Bambinos, my stroller, bags full of ABDL clothes and gear, and my steel spiked collar. I was going to drive half the trip, sleep in my car at a rest stop, then finish the drive the next day. I hit the border in Windsor at about 7:00. Apparently my nerves over the trip and crossing the border and everything else made them suspicious, so off to secondary screening I went.

They pawed around a bit, until they found the pacis in my bag. That made them think drugs, and off they went. They disassembled my car. Three hours later, the contents of my car, two of the four chairs, and some of the interior panels were spread across two parking spots in the secondary screening area. They considered the spikes on my collar to be weapons, and they found a set of lockpicks I had lost months before (they were in the overhead compartment all the way to the back behind a sunglass case, apparently).

Of course, I felt like I was going to die of embarrassment! They must have picked up on that, and at the end of it all, one of the guards said to me, "You know, we don't care what you do in your private time. We're federal agents at the busiest border crossing in Canada, and we have way too much stuff to do to worry about your private life. As long as you're straight up with us, we don't care."

And that was it. I probably gave them a story for the ages, but they actually helped me put my car back together and were courteous and very professional. They did refuse me entry, as apparently lockpicks are illegal to possess in Canada and they thought the collar could be used as a weapon. Before I could leave, though, I had to go to the immigration office, where they grilled me about my job, whether I was trying to get into Canada to work illegally, my finances, how much money I had in my bank accounts (since I had $8 in cash on me), and a bunch of other crap. After I finally convinced them I was just passing through, not trying to start a business in Canada without a work permit, I went home, dumped the oddball stuff off, got some sleep, and went back the next day. After a brief stint in secondary screening (they didn't search the car, just asked me a bunch of immigration stuff), I was finally on my way.

I've crossed the border numerous times since then without much problem. About the closest I got to a problem was the episode last year with the French guy that kept harassing me about my green paper. It turned out he didn't like the temporary tag on my new car and didn't speak enough English to competently ask me for the registration. After going round and round with him and figuring out he was on about the car, I handed him the whole stack of paperwork from the dealership, my registration, and proof of insurance, and he finally figured it out and left me alone.

Just curious to know where did you cross to get a French only CBP officer, I think the only place you can find them is around Quebec and New Brunswick crossings, all others are fluent in english usually.
 
Just curious to know where did you cross to get a French only CBP officer, I think the only place you can find them is around Quebec and New Brunswick crossings, all others are fluent in english usually.
He spoke English, but he wasn't good at it. This was in Windsor, too, crossing from Detroit via the tunnel.

Note to Canadians: Perhaps in Ontario everyone knows that the Green Paper is the registration paperwork for your car. That term is not familiar to Americans. We do have what we call a Green Card, though, which is the colloquial term for the documents granting immigrants legal residency status in the United States.

At least in the end we got it sorted. I just handed him the stack of papers from buying and registering the car (which I kept on hand in case of such an issue since I only had a temporary license plate on it) and he figured it out. Most of the time, crossing into Canada is pretty painless.

Coming back to the U.S.... Not so much. They're trained to be jerks, and they're very good at it. I usually find it more difficult getting back into the United States as a U.S. Citizen with a U.S. Passport than it is to get into Canada.
 
He spoke English, but he wasn't good at it. This was in Windsor, too, crossing from Detroit via the tunnel.

Note to Canadians: Perhaps in Ontario everyone knows that the Green Paper is the registration paperwork for your car. That term is not familiar to Americans. We do have what we call a Green Card, though, which is the colloquial term for the documents granting immigrants legal residency status in the United States.

At least in the end we got it sorted. I just handed him the stack of papers from buying and registering the car (which I kept on hand in case of such an issue since I only had a temporary license plate on it) and he figured it out. Most of the time, crossing into Canada is pretty painless.

Coming back to the U.S.... Not so much. They're trained to be jerks, and they're very good at it. I usually find it more difficult getting back into the United States as a U.S. Citizen with a U.S. Passport than it is to get into Canada.

If you think its difficult to get back to USA as a US citizen with a passport, you wouldn't believe how hard it can be sometimes to cross the border as a Canadian, last time I had to let them copy my 3 usb key that contained informations that aren't of their business, they claimed if I didn't accept it they could arrest me, I don't think it can go that far but now I'm scared to cross the border with any electronic or computers with me, since I never travel without my laptop and 3 external HDD, I'm not sure when I'll try to cross the border again.
 
I think the system is slanted to the degree that the Border Authorities give the regular routine bona-fida residents the nth degree shakedown with the idea
that those that are thinking of becoming citizens will get the message that I don't want to live here if I have to go thru all those flaming hoops !

That and some of the federalli jerks just like to be on a power trip throwing their weight around !
Also noted no one is trying to stop anyone from leaving the country except for those bastard Benedict Arnold ISILs who should be shot on sight !
Absolutely no sympathy for terrorists disowning the country !
 
I used to haul RVs on a semi-truck to Canada. For a while, I was crossing the border two to three times per month, each way. The vast majority of the time I cleared Canadian customs in two minutes or less. A couple of times they checked the interior of the campers I was hauling. Once they went through the entire truck with a fine-toothed comb and wanted the password to my laptop.

That's when it got "interesting". My previous laptop had broken on the previous trip and I had replaced it just a week prior. I was still setting things up and catching up reading on web sites that I follow. One of those sites is Carole Jean's Petticoat Punishment Art site. Three days before I crossed the border into Canada, I had looked through a LOT of her pictures from Christeen. For those of you who are not familiar with Christeen's work, it consists of some pretty radical forced feminization pictures of a teenage boy. Not real people, but artists' renderings of people.

I don't download these pictures because I don't want them on my hard drive and I can always go back and look at them at the source. However, it didn't occur to me that they might be hanging around in the browser cache. They were, and the customs agent found them. What followed rates among the scariest two and a half hours of my life. I wear ladies' pajamas to sleep in, and had Bambino diapers, a paci and other AB things in my luggage. None of that was illegal, but the pictures WERE. When asked about them, I told them that any pictures they found had to be in my browser cache, and even there I didn't have any pictures of real minors. And the pictures in the cache weren't pornographic. The problem was that, according to the customs agent, any image depicting the torture of minors is illegal even if it is just stick figures. And it didn't matter whether I had intended to bring them into Canada or not. All that mattered was that I brought illegal depictions of minors being tortured (forced fem pics) into Canada.

Considering that I thought I was facing anything from being denied entry (with a load of trailers that I wouldn't be able to deliver, wrecking my job and possibly my career) to being charged with a sex crime in another country, it goes without saying that I was extremely nervous. While all of this was going on, I had to surrender my keys, passport and Leatherman tool. They also wanted to know the locations of any other computers and storage devices (external HD, memory cards, USB drives, etc) in the truck. When I asked about using the rest room, the agent behind the counter radioed to the ones inspecting my truck to get permission, like I might abandon my truck and try to flee back across the border on foot. And I was forced to discuss what was in my truck as well as explaining infantalism to the agent at the counter with a room full of a lot of other people waiting to clear customs able to hear every word. I was trying to make sure that he understood that while some people fantasized about forcibly feminizing others, people like me fantasized about being on the receiving end and thus were not a threat to anyone. Scary and embarrassing, too.

In the end, the agent required me to go through an immigration check again and then cleared me to go. No harm done except for some premature aging and lost time on the road. They didn't even mess up the truck, or at least they put everything back where they found it. When I stopped for the night, I went into FireFox, cleared the cache, and set it up for private browsing before doing anything else with it. And wouldn't you know it, they never asked to search my computer again.

They didn't set any "watch out for this guy" flags in their computers, either, because I went right back to clearing Customs in just a minute or two. But I did learn my lesson about making sure that I didn't have anything on my computer that could get me in trouble.

I've also gone through Customs while padded (although I wasn't padded that day) and no one ever said a thing, U.S. Customs or Canadian Customs.

I don't think you have anything to worry about as long as you make SURE you don't have any pictures on your computer that will get their attention. If you browse web sites with pictures that they might not like, be sure and clear your cache just to be on the safe side. And if you store any pictures like that on your computer, move them to removable media and leave them at home.

Enjoy your visit to Canada.

LittleOne
 
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It's a good idea to remember that within 100 miles of a country's border, your rights as a citizen are basically suspended. It's generally agreed internationally that a country has a "right to defend its border", and so search-and-seizure laws are amped up considerably there. Notice I didn't say AT the border. It really does apply out a distance from the border. Just because you've made the crossing doesn't mean you can still be subjected to "enhanced security"
 
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