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British Slang

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m8mamiya

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So i was just on a random curious thought train when i came across a lil factiod that i think you guys can help me with.

So i know that Europe has some terms for certain objects like diapers and ciggarettes, Nappies and fags respectively. But i wanted to know, what other slang terms are out there that Europe uses that America doesnt.
 

WoodlandWanderer

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Well slang terms are different everywhere, so without knowing the american terms I can't say if the british terms are different.

On a similar note Nappy isn't slang, it is the word we use instead of diaper. Such as we say holiday instead of vacation, and toilet instead of restroom. See list above for more.

I think you will find the word nappy was derived from the word napkin, and that the material used to make a cloth nappy was known as the diaper cloth. This is where your word diaper actually originated from.
 
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BluTack

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Listern here me china. What we need to do is go down the rubber-dub-dub for some Nelson Mandela. There no need to worry theres no pairs.

If you don't know what I'm saying, check up on cockney rhyming slag.

Cor blimey look at the harry lime. I gotta go for me rosy and get a Joe Baxi. Don't be a tea leaf now.
 
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Error404

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They're all pretty much self explanatory other than a few things:

Biscuit
Chips
Gravy

Yeah, all seems to be in the food variety.
 

Peachy

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So i know that Europe has some terms for certain objects like diapers and ciggarettes, Nappies and fags respectively. But i wanted to know, what other slang terms are out there that Europe uses that America doesnt.
Europe has many languages. I've never counted them, but I reckon there are at least 50. This should illustrate my point:



Oh, and English is not the most common native language in Europe, and probably not the most commonly used language in every day stuff either. :tongueout:

Peachy
 

ade

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mizzycub

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Peachy's linguo map misses more than just Cornish (though that language isn't spoken any more. It became extinct then people tried to revive it) - there are a great number of things that linguists consider separate languages that the average person off the street probably doesn't. This map doesn't show those, though it's pretty good for making the point of how many languages there are!
 

Darkfinn

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I got a laugh out of the use of the term "Buggery" in a DVD I watched recently.
 
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Elli

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So i know that Europe has some terms for certain objects like diapers and ciggarettes, Nappies and fags respectively.
I think 'fag' is sort of a slang word for cigarette, yup. But nappy is not a slang word.

On a similar note Nappy isn't slang, it is the word we use instead of diaper. Such as we say holiday instead of vacation.
Zactly. :D

They're all pretty much self explanatory other than a few things:

Biscuit
Chips
Gravy

Yeah, all seems to be in the food variety.
Chips: Well, if you chip off bits of potato and fry them, you have fried potato chips. You could call those fries or chips. If you slice potato thinly and fry it until crispy, you could call that chips or crisps. In the UK we do say fries, usually when talking about the thinner ones, like at MacDonalds. And we say chips (in place of crisps) when talking about Doritos type dipping chips.

Biscuit: 'The origin of the word "biscuit" is from Latin via Middle French and means "cooked twice...' Biscuit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Again, in Englad we sometimes say cookie when referring to the larger chocolate-chip type ones.

Gravy: French origin, but came from a mis-spelling of 'grane', meaning “full of grains,” or “nicely spiced” before printing press had been invented and handwriting was relied upon to pass on recipes. word of the day gravy | podictionary - for word lovers - dictionary etymology, trivia & history

So what do other countries call gravy? I thought it was just one of those universal words. I'd never thought about that one.

Language is a strange and cool thing because it all comes from somewhere and it all evolves. A lot of English comes from other languages.
 

Dude84

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That's not really "slang", just words the british and americans use differntly. anyways the list of those is almost endless, check it out :D
List of words having different meanings in British and American English
Oh, I disagree :p

Some examples I can think of (together with notes and examples according to my understanding - even on this small island there are variations):

geez a further abbreviated version of 'geezer', basically, a person.
"Alright geez?". Tends to be used by the 'boy racer' variety of young males.

dog 'n bone cocky slang for a telephone.
"Pick up the dog 'n bone". Used mainly in cockney parts of London.

chav lower class/proletariat person.
"The chavs have been causing trouble again". Normally associated with youths wearing sportswear, commiting petty crimes and claiming state benefits.

dosser a lazy person, not doing much, possibly homeless.
"He's just dossing around".

chip buttie i'm not too sure about this one. I believe it's cooked chips (not crisps) served on a buttered bread roll. From the North of England - perhaps someone from that area could enlighten me?

corner shop a local, normally suburban convenience store. The term originates from many of these being converted ex-houses located on street corners.

footie football. Because, no word can be short enough. :p

mag a particuarly distasteful (in my opinion) version of magazine - the printed type, not ammunition. :-O
 
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