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Bpa

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CrazyCanuck

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I know what it is and what is does chemically and biologically in the body, but I was wondering how big of an issue it is. ie. Should I go out of the way to buy a new bottle if I'm not sure if mine is BPA free? Or is it not that big an issue in adults?

Thanks,
Kevin
 
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I know what it is and what is does chemically and biologically in the body, but I was wondering how big of an issue it is. ie. Should I go out of the way to buy a new bottle if I'm not sure if mine is BPA free? Or is it not that big an issue in adults?

Thanks,
Kevin
I really try these days to get BPA-free stuff. I bought a new bike water bottle (but mine was thrashed beyond recognition anyway), and have called up a company (the ones who make "Bolthouse Farms" products) to inquire about their bottle's BPA status. I was assured that they're actually BPA-free; I gave a recommendation that they print that on the packaging.

Point being: If someone like ME is going a bit out of their way to do this, then it's likely worth avoiding if possible. Like margarine (almost plastic, thank you very much). Hence, my advice is to do everything you can to avoid it wherever and whenever possible.
 

CrazyCanuck

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I suppose your right, better to be safe then sorry. Looks like I'm in the market for a new bottle now :sad: Thanks for the advice.

And ya, I know how bad margarine is, never touch the stuff lol, Guess BPA is just another tings to avoid.

Thanks again,
Kevin
 

Peachy

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What is "BPA"? :confused:

Peachy
- still hating abbreviations
 

recovery

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What is "BPA"? :confused:

Peachy
- still hating abbreviations
I think it's "Bisphenol A" a compound known to harm humans. Typically used in certain types of plastic. I think I read this awhile. Am I right in saying most products are safe unless you scratch the surface which then, it would 'leak' and contaminate the food stuffs in the container.
 

CrazyCanuck

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Basically, its a chemical found in some plastics that, upon entering the body, becomes and endocrine disruptor (stops hormones from functioning properly). It takes quite a bit to cause serious problems (3000+mg BPA/Kg body weight). It was my understanding that it was worse in babies and children cause of their reduced body size, but I wasn't sure if it was that big an issue in adults (which is why I started this thread :smile: ).

But ya, i'm going with h3g3l's advice and avoiding it...probably better

Kevin
 
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soren456

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Margarine . . . is bad? :no2:
 
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BPA is not only bad because it *could* affect your health...its bad because it sticks around. A lot. So even if that small amount that will (and yes, it *will*) leach out of the baby bottle into you may not hurt you, it will also leach it out into the environment every time you wash it, it will lose BPA on dust that sticks to it, etc etc...so you're indirectly adding to the amount of BPA in the environment, where it's very persistent. As environmental levels rise, the amount of it we eat without meaning to increases, so down the line, you're harming everyone by using products with it.

Indecently, the EPA, FDA, and all companies that use BPA in the US claim there's absolutely nothing wrong with it. Completely safe, chaps. As healthy for you as a cigarette. 4 out of 5 doctors agree. And yet its now a selling point to not have it in your product. It's also banned in some countries. But not here! While its not in as many baby bottles or water bottles now, it still helps us by existing in the liners of canned goods and the liner of your toothpaste tube. Good luck avoiding it. Even if every company stops making it, expect it to remain around in the environment at current levels for another half a century at least. A study found BPA in every sample of seafood in a Singapore market, and its currently in the bodies of 95% of US adults. But don't worry. Completely harmless. Use only as directed.
 

Eulogy

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Margarine=Black naturally, they add yellow food coloring to make it that golden color...

In regards to BPA, it isn't created with the plastic, it is a component found in some of the cheaper plastics
 

CrazyCanuck

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Margarine=Black naturally, they add yellow food coloring to make it that golden color...

In regards to BPA, it isn't created with the plastic, it is a component found in some of the cheaper plastics
Didn't know that bit about margarine, thanks!

Do you happen to know which plastics its found in? ie. what plastic codes on the bottom of things should I be worried about?

Cheers,
Kevin
 

Trevor

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Margarine=Black naturally, they add yellow food coloring to make it that golden color...

In regards to BPA, it isn't created with the plastic, it is a component found in some of the cheaper plastics
I think it's pretty hard to get yellow from black. From my parents' experience, its natural color was white and it came with yellow color packets for mixing post-purchase (the butter guys didn't like the competition). Jibes with this site's info: Food Facts & Trivia: Margarine but I'd be interested to see something about black. I just don't see how you add color and get yellow once something is black.
 
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I think it's pretty hard to get yellow from black. From my parents' experience, its natural color was white and it came with yellow color packets for mixing post-purchase (the butter guys didn't like the competition). Jibes with this site's info: Food Facts & Trivia: Margarine but I'd be interested to see something about black. I just don't see how you add color and get yellow once something is black.
I was going to reply with same. I understand that kids' work in the 50s and 60s here in the USA included folding the coloring into the margarine.

I would also be interested to see "naturally" black margarine. *blech*
 
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