Are you IPv6 ready?

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Alecs

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Hey guys, have you heard about IPv6 day? It was yesterday I think. Anyways in case you didn't know, your IP is like your address for getting online. The Earth currently uses IPv4, but we're out of addresses for everyone, so there's IPv6, but not everyone has that. Do you have it? Are you ready for... IPocalypse?!

Also, a note to ADISC staff, are you guys ready? Many websites are getting IPv6 IP's for their sites. It's the next generation of Internet technology!
 

BabyBeau

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I'm not sure if I am or not, but I should really look into that. I have to ask though, did you make this thread just so you could use IPocalypse? The truth now! :p
 
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Alecs

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I'm not sure if I am or not, but I should really look into that. I have to ask though, did you make this thread just so you could use IPocalypse? The truth now! :p

No, I made this thread to tell people about a new thing(well not really new, but new to them). I'm pretty sure most people don't, because most ISPs don't. I currently use a tunnel through my IPv4 address to get my IPv6 address.
 

BoundCoder

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I'm pretty sure most people don't, because most ISPs don't.

This is pretty much the (sad) issue with this. I played around a bit locally using a tunnel (hurricane electric) but until I know how my ISP is going to assign an IP to me, doing so was little more than an experience in learning.

I suspect a long period of carrier-grade NAT and other hacks before ipv6 really takes off. Would be nice to think we'd be doing a slow, controlled roll-out, but given ISPs have dragged their heals on this for nearly a decade, I don't see it happening cleanly.

As a side note, I really don't like the way ipv6 works. I mean I realize we have to switch to _something_, and at this point ipv6 is the only option, but I really think ipv6 is gonna cause lots of problems excluding the roll-over issues.
 

ShortGuy

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I have actively shut down ipv6 on my computer.
Mainly because i do not want any "bleedthrough" when using my non logging, anonymity proxy.

I like to partake of the internets many possibilites viewing tv-shows & movies without comercials ;)
(and NOT get an angry letter from my ISP)
 

Jcub

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Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any UK ISPs which actually support IPv6. I may have to look in to various methods of getting around this. From my brief, inexperienced glance at ADISCs DNS records, the site appears to be IPv6 ready to some extent at least, though I can't attest to how functional it is :D
 

BoundCoder

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No, this is a real issue. Soon there won't be enough IP's for every computer. This new system would provide trillions, which would last longer.

In all fairness, the millenium bug was actually a real issue. Nothing major happened because of a _massive_ effort to correct or at least mitigate the issue on impacted systems. Anyone working in the software industry at the time knows this quite well. The media actually did us a huge favor for once by scaring the shit out of everyone to the point that the suits were actually willing to pony up the cash and proactively fix the problem rather than putting out the fires afterwards! Not saying we'd have lasers shooting out of street lights (love that episode) but there were definitely systems which _would_ have had issues.

I'd love to say this will be the same, but as we are seeing, it won't be. ISPs have known about this problem for quite a long time, but because there is no financial reason to do it (they can't charge you more money for IPv6, but it costs a fortune to roll it out) they are going to wait until actual problems start appearing. I suspect there will be a period between actual IPv4 exhaustion (technically we are out of IPv4 addresses, but this won't effect us peons down here for a while) and IPv6 being common place enough for a major service to not need an IPv4. People are probably as we speak hording IPv4 addresses to auction off at insane prices when the time comes.
 

LinkFloyd

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I thankfully can count on comcast for IPv6 readiness, as well as the fact I only run windows 7 on all of my computers
 

Chimera

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I'm half ready and half IDK. Because at my dad's, charter communications is ready, I heard they have all of their equipment upgraded to DOCSIS Version 3.0 so they are ready for the transition whenever the hell they want. Thing is that they have plenty of IPv4 IP addresses to go around in our city, so they don't really have any motivation to switch everything over yet.

However, where I spend most of my time (mom's) I don't know if they are ready, especially since they serve mostly rural areas, they are probably running on old equipment right now. Oh well, time will tell...
 

Macky

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Im ready. My ISP Isn't so I set up a IP4to6 Tunnel with Hurricane Electric on my DD-WRT Router :)

In other news, you can test your connectivity here: http://test-ipv6.com
ipv6.png
 
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Badger

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Unfortunately, I'm not aware of any UK ISPs which actually support IPv6.
AAISP is one. There are one or two others, too. They're all fairly "premium"/business-type ISPs, however. AAISP are very good, I really cannot fault them, but you get what you pay for - i.e. each 2GB of data transfer during the day (0900-1800) costs about £3 (outside of those hours, and at weekends, it's a fair bit cheaper, but still charged). They gave us, for free, a block of 64 IPv4 addresses because we have ~50 machines in the house, so with that many IPs we can have one public address for each machine. Not necessary at all (we genuinely need more than one, but 8 or 16 would have been more than enough), but the guy who runs AAISP absolutely hates NAT, so is very happy to throw IP addresses at customers so they don't have to use NAT :p Anyway, IPv6-wise they provide native v6 addresses over ADSL lines, and you can request numerous address blocks from them, too, but since they assign you a /48 immediately, you rarely need any more. It's all set up nicely at home so everything just has immediate v6 access with no extra work on our part :)

Test your IPv6. gives us a nice 10/10 result at home.

And yes, this means I can see fun things like Facebook's IPv6 address: 2620:0:1cfe:face:b00c::3:
And Sprint.net's IPv6 address: 2600:: (seriously - top-tier ISPs can do that sort of thing! Who said IPv6 addresses were difficult to remember?)
And the BBC's IPv6 address: 2001:4b10:bbc::2
And Cisco is apparently using 2001:420:80:1:c:15c0:d06:f00d ("dog food" as in "test your own dog food" - run your company on your own products)

There isn't a pressing need for existing websites to support IPv6, really. It's going to be a LONG time before standard consumers cannot access v4 sites because even when ISPs run out of addresses they'll either deploy CGNAT (which is a horrible solution that I hope most avoid) or support IPv6, assign v6 addresses to each customer and then add a NAT64 system to allow their v6 customers to still access whatever legacy v4 sites still exist. The other problem is when data centres and such run out of IPv4 addresses to give to new servers/websites. The only sensible solution to that is IPv6 deployment (alternatives are large-scale NAT with systems that look at the HTTP "Host" header to determine where to send the traffic - as vhosts do on existing shared hosts, but this would be at a much larger scale - but it's a hideous solution that I really can't imagine people using except as a backup system to allow a few remaining v4 customers to access a v6 site). But DCs running out of v4 addresses isn't going to affect existing sites, either, because they already have their IPs.

IPv6 is a big problem that needs people to wake up and do something about, and I'm truly saddened that uptake so far has been so pitiful, but it's not really a problem that ADISC staff need to worry about, in my view :)
 

Macky

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I agree Badger, there is no need for ADISC to go running to get IPv6 Addresses. I only have IPv6 Because im interested in routing and enjoyed setting it up.
Don't get me wrong, I love accessing sites via IPv6. It's fun :) I even have a caching DNS server from HE as my primary which uses Google over IPv6, meaning all google services natively jump to IPv6 for me without having to specify 'ipv6.google.com'
Also, I didn't realize the BBC had an IPv6 address! :)
 

Hex

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My VPS is IPv6 ready with a tunnel at the moment, and Linode are currently working on giving me native IPv6, so I'm all set there.

My home connection sadly is not. No Irish consumer ISP does IPv6. Down my part of the country, all the ISPs use NATs of some sort, so I can't even use one of HE's tunnels to get IPv6. I could tunnel through my VPS via SSH, but then all my traffic is going through my VPS slowing both that and my internet down.
 

Macky

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I was gonna recommend a HE tunnel but Nat will block protocol 41. As well as pretty much every other inbound service. Unlucky man :(
 

recovery

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I don't know the details of how 6in4 protocol works. But Surely there is a why to UDP hole punch? Either way, it is annoying. I have been meaning to get a solution of tunneling working with my router. But have yet to get it working (and I can't have too much down time on the internet in our house as it's shared by other people)
 

Macky

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I don't know the details of how 6in4 protocol works. But Surely there is a why to UDP hole punch? Either way, it is annoying. I have been meaning to get a solution of tunneling working with my router. But have yet to get it working (and I can't have too much down time on the internet in our house as it's shared by other people)

It uses protocol 41 rather than generic TCP/UDP
You either need to be able to specify protocol 41 on your router and pass it to a server to do your tunneling, or put custom firmware on your router and do it that way
For me it was as easy as anything, just registered on HE.net's website, click create tunnel and they spit out a ton of commapds to execute on your router, then just stuck that into DD-WRT's interface.
I then went on and configured ip6-tables and the like. If you can put DD-WRT on your router then do. It's awesome.
I can drop you the commands and RADVD config for DD-WRT if you do get it on. I think it has to be the mega build to support IPv6 though... Im not sure, check out their webpage
 

recovery

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Just had a little read, I understand protocol number 41. It's litterally the Protocol number in the IP header. like 0x0080 I think is the ethertype for ipv4. I guess it makes sense when you realise ipv6 doesn't support fragmenting and you want a decent MTU. It's something I haven't really understood well. You have path minimum mtu discovery. In TCP that's fine as you can't (nor should) specify the size of each packet and MSS (maximum segment size) variable is set it them. But UDP, that's not the case. I guess the software will either flag up an error or ignore any ICMP errors. As you can't guarantee delivery of UDP.

Although my router has openwrt. My house mates have played with it installing over software that it has no space on it. So Its just best to reflash it. But need to back up the massive list of IP and host assignments first. Won't do that by hand again! Although could do with a restart. It's on the many of my To-Do list. I did use dd-wrt I might go back, but the people who ran it all seemed to have a conflict of interest and didn't have a stable ipv6 release yet. Maybe times have changed.
 

Macky

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Yeah, DD-WRT is very fragmented. The build I have (Mega) Support IPv6 Fully, But dosent support ip6tables natively.
If you have openwrt you may be able to do it if it has ipv6 binaries. try binding an IPv6 address to one of its interfaces and see if it accepts it.
You can also try enabling radvd by just typing 'radvd' into its console. It it replies and you can bind ipv6 addresses to the adapters then your set.

For reference, this is what I use to provide IPv6 to my network:

Code:
modprobe ipv6
ip tunnel add he-ipv6 mode sit remote 216.66.80.26 local <enternal Ipv4> ttl 255
ip link set he-ipv6 up
ip addr add <routed 64> dev he-ipv6
ip route add ::/0 dev he-ipv6
ip -f inet6 addr
ip addr add <routed 48::1 with 64 prefix or radvd will moan> dev br0
sleep 10
radvd -C /jffs/radvd.conf

What I mean by the routed 48 with 64 prefix is you will be issued a 48 prefix by HE, format 2001:470:xxxx::1/48, you have to enter it as 2001:470:xxxx:0::1/64 otherwise radvd won't advertise it to your network.

(The extra zero is pointless, you can use 2001:470:xxxx::1/64, was just symbolizing the dropped segment)
Also, I used xxxx::1 as address 1 makes the most sense for my router :)

And the Radvd config:
Code:
interface br0 {
MinRtrAdvInterval 3;
MaxRtrAdvInterval 10;
AdvLinkMTU 1480;
AdvSendAdvert on;
prefix {routed 48 with /64 as above} {
AdvOnLink on;
AdvAutonomous on;
AdvValidLifetime 86400;
AdvPreferredLifetime 86400;
};
};

Don't forget to alter your interfaces, here br0 is my internal network (Its a bridge of the 4 ethernet connectors on the back of my router)
 
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