Any other religious and/or spiritual ABDLs here? How do you interpret ABDL within the context of your faith?

Keter

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I've seen a lot of really great threads recently about religion and ABDL recently and so I would really like to start a general thread about religion, this time in the Mature Topics section, as religion is a topic that should be discussed maturely. I would like to know if there other religious ABDLs on this forum, and how you interpret ABDL within the context of your faith. I think the crossroads between our spiritual lives and our kinky lives are fascinating, and seeing how they intersect is interesting.
 

HelloKittyBoi

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Well Christian since 4 years.
I am pretty sure the Bible says nothing about liking diapers. Nor does it say anything about liking socks and underwear ha ha.
What it does talk about tho, is sexual immorality. This puzzled me for a while: since wearing diapers is clearly (for me at least) a kink, isn't that sexually immoral?
Nope. The original meaning is about cheating on your spouse. So you're actually allowed to have many kinks as you want with your spouse. 😏
As long as 1)You dont harm anyone (including yourself) and 2) You don't let diapers come before God, there is nothing wrong with it.

I even have an "odd" belief, I don't know if many will share with me, that God expects you to wear diapers if you have that fetish. Like I have a feeling that during the judgment day he will be like "oh you didn't wear diapers? Too bad I mean that doesnt change much but you were supposed to". But maybe it's just me.

The real questions a Christian need to answer are "is what I'm doing evil"? And "does that prevent me from being a good christian and face my responsabilities"? (do they take too much room).

Imo if you can honestly answer "no" to both questions you're good to go :)

What do you think?
 
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Sapphyre

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In Buddhist thought, the pursuit of worldly desires and attachments is the cause of worldly birth and existence, and as such, renunciation is seen as a mark of progress toward liberation from the otherwise endless cycle. An emotional or sexual attachment or need for diapers is just another link in the proverbial chain binding one to worldly existence. Almost certainly not the largest one, though, so comparatively unimportant. Certainly there is no reason to feel guilty or bad about it, but it's important to be cognizant of the ways in which it limits you and controls you.

To no longer have such needs or desires would therefore be seen as progress. Abstaining from the object of one's desires while the desire still exists within oneself is probably counterproductive though; one can end up creating a "forbidden fruit" effect and causing the desire (and associated stress) to actually increase. This is true of diapers and many other things as well.
 

Drifter

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The difficult Buddhist question is - how does one rid oneself of all desires, including the desire to rid oneself of all desires?
 

Sapphyre

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The difficult Buddhist question is - how does one rid oneself of all desires, including the desire to rid oneself of all desires?
:LOL: Oh they get much harder than that my friend!

To answer this one though: having the desire to rid oneself of desires is somewhat like having training wheels on a bicycle. It's a good way to start out. ^.^ It becomes gradually unnecessary though; what drives the abandonment of desires is weariness of running in the same circles combined with the wisdom to see past them. Kind of like what drives most people to abandon playing games such as Tic-Tac-Toe, once you know the strategy it's pretty repetitive and boring.
 

CuriousUser

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The difficult Buddhist question is - how does one rid oneself of all desires, including the desire to rid oneself of all desires?
Im a Christian and I think this question could be applied to many religions out there. I think one way to rid yourself of desires is focus on serving and helping others. The more we do that the less we force on ourselves and those desires start to fade. it’s also a good thing to remember that desires, feeling and thoughts we want to be rid of rarely happen overnight. It takes time, and for myself, prayer and faith in my Savior.
 

egor

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I have been thinking this thread over since it was posted.

Looking at the history and events of the "religion" I was baptized into. I do not see how a diaper fetish is "wrong", considering what the "hagiarchy" has hurt children!

I had confessed to a part of the fetish once and the penance since it was self centered was to do kindness for others. So In my mind I do a lot of helping others to counter the time I focus on my needs.
 

Zeke

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The Christian descriptor is accurate as is the DL part but the AB doesn’t apply in my case. I’m not sure why but I don’t find myself regressing when I wear diapers. It seems like I’m just diapered in the moment and don’t feel any change in my age awareness. My ex-wife would probably have said that I never matured beyond being an infant.
 

Drifter

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what drives the abandonment of desires is weariness of running in the same circles combined with the wisdom to see past them. Kind of like what drives most people to abandon playing games such as Tic-Tac-Toe, once you know the strategy it's pretty repetitive and boring.
I think one way to rid yourself of desires is focus on serving and helping others. The more we do that the less we force on ourselves and those desires start to fade.
This sounds to me like trying to cultivate 'better' desires to replace desires we currently have. I think maybe the trick to ridding yourself of desires is to accept that desires arise naturally in the human body and you probably will never get rid of them. Maybe the focus should be on ridding yourself of the concern over good or bad desires; just accept them and move on.
 

Sapphyre

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This sounds to me like trying to cultivate 'better' desires to replace desires we currently have. I think maybe the trick to ridding yourself of desires is to accept that desires arise naturally in the human body and you probably will never get rid of them. Maybe the focus should be on ridding yourself of the concern over good or bad desires; just accept them and move on.
Growing weary of one proverbial game doesn't always entail seeking a better one, but it can be like that for awhile. Assuming we're still discussing Buddhist thought (despite the multi-quote), there are desires that lead to your having a human body, with its own naturally occurring desires, to begin with. You certainly will not have that human body forever, but if its desires have become habitual, the experience of a roughly similar lifetime driven by those desires is the natural result, and that can go on more or less forever. It is also not a foregone conclusion that the desires and vices that tend to accompany human birth cannot be overcome within this lifetime; in fact much practice is aimed at obtaining control over one's mind. It is important to acknowledge desires, rather than deny or suppress them, as a first step toward such control.
 

Jim100

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As long as it doesn't affect your relationship with God and you don't try to make an ass of yourself then I don't think anyone of faith should condemn you for wearing diapers.
 

Drifter

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Growing weary of one proverbial game doesn't always entail seeking a better one, but it can be like that for awhile. Assuming we're still discussing Buddhist thought (despite the multi-quote), there are desires that lead to your having a human body, with its own naturally occurring desires, to begin with. You certainly will not have that human body forever, but if its desires have become habitual, the experience of a roughly similar lifetime driven by those desires is the natural result, and that can go on more or less forever. It is also not a foregone conclusion that the desires and vices that tend to accompany human birth cannot be overcome within this lifetime; in fact much practice is aimed at obtaining control over one's mind. It is important to acknowledge desires, rather than deny or suppress them, as a first step toward such control.
I know nothing about Buddhist thought. Buddhism is often associated with zen, and I am fascinated by zen, but the only thing I think I know about it is that "zen" is a meaningless word. When I seek answers from zen it just throws my questions back in my face. I guess that's what it's supposed to do. The idea of mind control is an endless, philosophical swamp, and I don't know what qualifies me to distinguish between my "vices" and my virtues. I could be trying to overcome the wrong things.

I don't mean to disparage your beliefs, I'm just trying to overcome mine. It seems like my beliefs more than my desires are what's in the way.

Zen advice seems to be very down to earth and practical at times. When it comes to overcoming desires I think about the words of some ancient zen master: "When you're cold, move a little closer to the fire". Just that. It seems like a simple statement yet it has an odor of something profound.
 

PrincessBrattyButt

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I'm Wiccan, and let me just say-- I'm disappointed that I haven't seen any other Wiccan AB/DLs/Littles. I'm not saying that you should be. It's more or less a desire to relate to others. Since my religion's only true "rule" is "If it harms none, do what thou will" (except when it comes to survival), I can do anything without it interrupting my relationship with the deities.

Since the ABDL lifestyle is generally considered to be healthy, I'm not harming myself or others, therefore it is perfectly acceptable. Now, that might lead one to the question "what about your sexual preferences" since I am a masochist. Which is a good point. However, a true masochist doesn't interpret pain during sex as actual pain- it is instead interpreted as pleasure. But it has to be a certain type of pain. A masochist who enjoys spanking wouldn't feel the pleasure if they stubbed their toe on the doorway (unless they're into that, you never really know).

In conclusion, as long as I'm enjoying myself and I'm not harming others, I can enjoy my AB lifestyle without any religion-based guilt.
 

Sapphyre

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I know nothing about Buddhist thought. Buddhism is often associated with zen, and I am fascinated by zen, but the only thing I think I know about it is that "zen" is a meaningless word. When I seek answers from zen it just throws my questions back in my face. I guess that's what it's supposed to do. The idea of mind control is an endless, philosophical swamp, and I don't know what qualifies me to distinguish between my "vices" and my virtues. I could be trying to overcome the wrong things.

I don't mean to disparage your beliefs, I'm just trying to overcome mine. It seems like my beliefs more than my desires are what's in the way.

Zen advice seems to be very down to earth and practical at times. When it comes to overcoming desires I think about the words of some ancient zen master: "When you're cold, move a little closer to the fire". Just that. It seems like a simple statement yet it has an odor of something profound.
Zen is one school of Buddhism; there are many others. Different "flavors" with differing emphases that work for different sorts of people. While I've grown fond of Zen, it didn't appeal to me as much initially because it kind of jumps into meditation and such but mostly avoids the philosophical justification behind it. I kind of "live in my head", so I really needed something more for my mind to chew on before I could appreciate that.

Buddhism is a much broader topic than I could possibly cover here without completely derailing the thread, but if I were to give an "executive summary" from my own perspective and practice, it would go something like this: the central teaching is commonly translated as "emptiness" but could arguably be more aptly translated as "essencelessness". Anything that exists lacks any sort of fundamental essence or substance that can be identified or pinned down as belonging to it; stated another way, there is no such thing as independent existence, of anything, anywhere, ever (including "you" as a being). One popular illustration of this idea is to consider a boat whose parts are gradually replaced over time as needed, until eventually not a single original component remains. Is it still the same boat? If so, how can it be, where is the essence that gives the boat its identity? If not, then at what point did it cease to be? The very idea of identity starts to crack at the seams…

A corollary to this is that any concept of reality is necessarily a misperception, as conceptual understanding hinges upon pinning "essential" things down as a starting point. "True understanding" is therefore beyond the realm of all conceptual knowledge, and the Buddha's teachings were somewhat unique in that they were intended to help one to break free from pre-existing conceptual beliefs (notably, the issue you mentioned struggling with), rather than to propagate a specific conceptual idea. As such, the contents of the teaching are entirely a function of the target audience; in fact there are many accounts of the Buddha giving seemingly contradictory replies to different people's queries (and was challenged over it by his followers), and he explained why the answer he gave would be most helpful for guiding each person he gave it to. The "truth" is not to be found within his teachings, they only help to get one "unstuck" from conceptual ideas that occlude their ability to understand the nature of existence first-hand for themselves.

One related and popular Zen story goes something like this: A Zen master approaches you and says, "I am going to ask you your name. If you tell me, I'll hit you with my stick. If you lie, I'll hit you with my stick. If you don't answer, I'll hit you with my stick." What should you do? Of course the answer is some variant of "take the master's stick away from him before he hits you with it". It seems a little trite and silly, like many Zen stories, but the point is that the solution was not any of the options that the master enumerated for you… if you let your mind become trapped into thinking those are the only choices you have — if you bought into that conceptual "truth" — then you're going to get hit with the stick. ^.^ The same lesson applies to much larger and more profound matters.

I hope that helps a little, but if you're curious we might want to make this a side discussion. ^.^
 

StrangelyShapedTree

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I've seen a lot of really great threads recently about religion and ABDL recently and so I would really like to start a general thread about religion, this time in the Mature Topics section, as religion is a topic that should be discussed maturely. I would like to know if there other religious ABDLs on this forum, and how you interpret ABDL within the context of your faith. I think the crossroads between our spiritual lives and our kinky lives are fascinating, and seeing how they intersect is interesting.
I personally believe that Christianity aims to transcend the soul out of the world while it still has a body. So any attachment to anything other than what is above might be considered sinful. And anything that pleases the flesh on a regular basis is (according to the Catholic Church) mortally sinful. However indulging in a fetish without sexual undertones is probably not damning, I think, although it does inhibit the soul's journey toward Heaven. Accepting that this fetish is pretty much perfectly fine from an ontological, Christian standpoint has been the hardest facet of my faith, but I'm pretty sure Jesus doesn't think I should go to Hell for this, especially since I didn't choose to have it.
 

Zeke

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Anything that stands between the Christian and their Redeemer, anything or anyone that you hold in higher regard than your Savior will prevent you from being all God would have you be. Keeping your focus on Christ as you go about daily life is the relationship that He desires us to Have with Him. In my opinion diapers and the accompanying fetish is not a problem because of the material items but rather the focus of my time and attention on them rather than Jesus and what He would have me do. But on a lighter note that wrap that He, and the disciples wore did closely resemble a diaper (at least the diapers of that day).
 

Traemo

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I'm Wiccan, and let me just say-- I'm disappointed that I haven't seen any other Wiccan AB/DLs/Littles.
Wicca's a bit limiting (even with all its flavors) - you might be better off looking a bit more broadly. I follow a different, though somewhat related, tradition.

For me, it's much the same thing: "sin" derives from harm, intentional or not. There's very little about ABDL that I find inherently harmful on any level and much that is beneficial. So, from that perspective, there's really no conflict.
 

PrincessBrattyButt

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Wicca's a bit limiting (even with all its flavors)
That's where you're wrong. Wicca is a very open religion, with room for interpretation. Maybe if you're Wiccan and you were raised to see it that way, or that's how you were taught, then I can see why you say that.
 

Drifter

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the central teaching [of Buddhism] is commonly translated as "emptiness" but could arguably be more aptly translated as "essencelessness". Anything that exists lacks any sort of fundamental essence or substance that can be identified or pinned down as belonging to it;

A corollary to this is that any concept of reality is necessarily a misperception, as conceptual understanding hinges upon pinning "essential" things down as a starting point.
This could all be applied to any concept of religion too. It seems that the purpose of religion is to get you on a path towards some kind of spiritual realization, but at some point it becomes necessary to break free of all the trappings of the religion itself. When a respected zen master gave a student his volume of work detailing the teachings and practical advice for running the monastery, painstakingly written over his years of experience, the student immediately tossed it into a fire, and went on to become the next zen master.

I see a similar idea expressed in the Christian bible, which is cited by many Christians as being the foundation for their religious beliefs. If you read the bible enough, sooner or later you run across the question (I'm paraphrasing) "Why are you seeking the living from among the dead?"
 

HelloKittyBoi

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This could all be applied to any concept of religion too. It seems that the purpose of religion is to get you on a path towards some kind of spiritual realization
Ha ha no not at all. Christianity is like that, but judaism ans islam both seek to control human behavior (circumcision, theocracy, sharia or talmudic laws, slicing of the throats of animals, all kinds of rituals), rather than seek faith alone. It's actually what makes Christianity very different from these two religions.
 
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