Adults in nappies - UK press article

Karoq

Est. Contributor
Messages
266
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Diaper Lover
  3. Incontinent
Interesting read in today’s Daily Mail about the rise in adults wearing nappies.

Why so many adults in the UK are now wearing nappies


https://mol.im/a/13514437
 
Since this is behind one of those daft subscription walls, I think this is around ⅔ of the article I can access without paying for it.
Revealed: Why so many adults in Britain are wearing nappies - and are being misled into using them rather than seeking treatment

02:00, 11 Jun 2024, updated 02:05, 11 Jun 2024
By Rosie Taylor
The silver-haired actor Harry Van Gorkum — who once starred in Friends as Monica’s British ‘soulmate’ Don — stands in a luxury apartment in his underwear and looks confidently at the camera.

‘Now we’re comfortable, let’s talk urine leakage,’ he says, holding up an incontinence pad for men which he promises ‘slips discreetly into my underwear’.

Not so long ago it would have been unthinkable to see this on prime-time TV.

But while it’s undeniable that advertising like this is helping open up conversations around incontinence, critics warn that this kind of marketing also exploits people’s embarrassment — encouraging them to buy products to soak up leaks instead of seeking medical help for an often treatable problem.

Meanwhile, there are concerns that people in hospital or care homes, particularly older patients, are falling victim to a ‘pad culture’, which means that, even if they are not incontinent, they are put in nappies (and then left in them for hours).

Incontinence affects more than one in five people in the UK and demand for products to treat it is soaring.

Friends actor Harry Van Gorkum in an advert for Tena where he holds up an incontinence pad that he promises 'slips discreetly into my underwear'
Incontinence affects more than one in five people in the UK and demand for products to treat it is soaring
Incontinence affects more than one in five people in the UK and demand for products to treat it is soaring
From ‘adult nappies’ which, like baby nappies, come as pull-on pants or wraparound pads with sticky tabs; to washable, reusable pants; or stick-on pads and liners worn inside underwear, sales increased by 13.2 per cent in the year to March.

Last year we spent a staggering £234 million on these products, according to market data analyst Kantar, with around 1.16 billion individual items sold — that’s equivalent to 37 incontinence products bought every second.

The UK is far from alone: customers in the U.S. account for about a third of global spending on incontinence products, European countries for another quarter — but sales are growing most rapidly in Asia, particularly in China, India, South Korea, Taiwan and Japan.

Indeed, the Japanese manufacturer Oji Holdings has recently announced that it is switching from making baby to adult nappies because of changing demand.

Arguably, it’s a financially savvy move, too, because manufacturers can charge more for larger adult products.

In Tesco, a packet of 12 medium Tena adult nappy pants costs £8.55 (71p per nappy) — baby nappies were less than a third of the price, with a pack of 64 size five Pampers nappy pants costing £14 (22p per nappy).

What's behind rising demand?
Clever advertising may be driving sales (more on that later) but experts believe that failings in care are also fuelling the rise — with too many people ending up in nappies for treatable problems.

The value of incontinence liners, pads and pants in the UK is rising. It is thought that clever advertising may be driving sales
Incontinence is not an illness but a symptom of other health problems, such as damage to the bladder and bowel or the pelvic floor muscles that support them.

It can also be caused by neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis, and the side-effects of certain medications, including HRT (hormone replacement therapy) and some antidepressants.

Research suggests that around one in three women in the UK experiences some form of leaks (often owing to damage sustained during pregnancy and childbirth); menopause can also trigger or aggravate symptoms, as hormonal changes reduce the elasticity and strength of the pelvic floor.

In men, incontinence becomes more common in later life — around one in ten over 65 experiences leaks, typically as the result of an enlarged prostate or treatment for prostate cancer.

Incontinence is generally more common later in life, with around one in ten over-65s experiencing leaks
Obesity is another risk factor — excess weight and body fat put pressure on the bladder and its supporting muscles; so, too, is getting older.

Although incontinence affects all ages, it’s far more common in older people, and one of the most common reasons for them being admitted into care or nursing homes.

The NHS says approximately a third of care home residents and two-thirds of nursing home residents experience urinary and/or faecal incontinence.

But NHS England is clear — incontinence is usually treatable.

The health service already spends around £80 million a year on incontinence pants and pads (or ‘containment products’, as it calls them) but says their use should be kept to a minimum and ‘treatment [of incontinence] must always be the preferred option’.

Under NHS guidelines, people experiencing incontinence should be assessed by specialist staff to rule out any serious underlying problems and/or have a medication review with a GP.

A month's supply of incontinence pants from the supermarket costs around £87

Once a cause is established, conservative treatments for both men and women include dietary advice (for example, avoiding caffeine, alcohol and artificial sweeteners which can irritate the bladder, and increasing fibre intake for healthy bowels) and pelvic floor muscle exercises and/or bladder retraining, to teach patients how to wait longer between loo visits.

If these don’t work, patients are meant to be referred to a specialist and may be given medication (to improve muscle tone or alter the body’s signals about when to urinate) or offered surgery, such as procedures to support the bladder.

‘Containment products can offer security and comfort, helping people continue with their normal daily activities. However, they are costly [a month’s supply of incontinence pants from the supermarket costs around £87], can affect a person’s dignity and do not offer a long-term solution unless the person has not responded to other treatments,’ the guidance adds.

It is important that men with symptoms seek treatment as soon as possible because incontinence can be a sign of an underlying health problem, such as an enlarged prostate, says Hamid Abboudi, a consultant urological surgeon at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and founder of londonandsurrey urology.com.

‘If you notice any changes to your urine flow, you should see a doctor,’ he adds.

‘If you leave it too long, it can be much harder to treat and can cause lasting damage to the bladder or kidneys.’

With women, most cases of incontinence are related to pelvic floor damage and are usually treatable, says Tina Mason, a specialist pelvic physiotherapist at the private Women’s Health Brighton clinic.

‘The pelvic floor muscles are like any other muscles in the body,’ she says.

‘If you injured your leg, you wouldn’t just drag it around behind you. It should be the same with your pelvic floor.

‘It’s always good to get these things sorted earlier rather than later, but even when you are into your 70s and 80s, a physio can give you tailored exercises to improve or stop incontinence symptoms. It is never too late.’

If symptoms worsen because of changes around menopause, as well as pelvic floor exercises, oestrogen hormone creams and vaginal moisturisers can improve tissue elasticity, she adds.

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) says giving more people access to pelvic floor and bladder-training programmes would improve their quality of life and save the NHS money on incontinence products and hospital admissions.
But, instead, older patients in particular are being pushed into using adult nappies.

Edit, have now found the article free of tabloid paywalls, https://progresnews.com/news/reveal...ng-them-rather-than-seeking-treatment/112646/
 
Last edited:
  • Love
  • Like
Reactions: neurallink and Dinotopian2002
HappyNappin said:
Since this is behind one of those daft subscription walls, I think this is around ⅔ of the article I can access without paying for it.


Edit, have now found the article free of tabloid paywalls, https://progresnews.com/news/reveal...ng-them-rather-than-seeking-treatment/112646/
I was able to scroll the entire article from the original Daily Mail site with no paywall...

But from cursory glances, looks like the main gist is "Normalising the use of products for mild symptoms risks could discourage patients from seeking treatment"... As if incontinence can be "cured"...
 
My guess is that the root of the problem lies with the peculiar way the NHS prioritizes patients ... because they don't.

I'm sure time-pressed doctors and besieged caregivers find it far easier to fork over a supply of very mediocre incontinence products rather than taking time to assess and deal with the root cause.
 
  • Like
Reactions: artemisenterri
sbmccue said:
My guess is that the root of the problem lies with the peculiar way the NHS prioritizes patients ... because they don't.

I'm sure time-pressed doctors and besieged caregivers find it far easier to fork over a supply of very mediocre incontinence products rather than taking time to assess and deal with the root cause.
IM(ns)HO, that's what happens when there's only one primary source for all medical services... At least here in the US with so many separate medical groups, there's more potential to get 2nd or even 3rd opinions on a situation...
 
You can get second and third opinions in the UK as well ... but you have to pay for them, just like you do in the United States.

The various NHS Trusts will always adopt the cheapest and most time-conserving approach, which means it's far easier to provide patients with pads and diapers (such as they are) than to assess them, diagnose them, and treat whatever is the real problem.
 
Last edited:
sbmccue said:
You can get second and third opinions in the UK as well ... but you have to pay for them, just like you do in the United States.

The various NHS Trusts will always adopt the cheapest and most time-conserving approach, which means it's far easier to provide patients with pads and diapers (such as they are) than to assess them, diagnose them, and treat whatever is the real problem.
What I meant was that doctors in the US are more likely to do deeper analysis than what I've seen reported for doctors in the UK.
 
artemisenterri said:
I was able to scroll the entire article from the original Daily Mail site with no paywall...

But from cursory glances, looks like the main gist is "Normalising the use of products for mild symptoms risks could discourage patients from seeking treatment"... As if incontinence can be "cured"...
well...I've been trying to be "cured" for well over 20 years now with ZERO success and now I am faced with worsening bowel issues on top of my full blown U-IC due to severe spinal stenosis and EXTREME stenosis around my Coccyx which is also causing my right leg to just "go out" without warning and ZERO control when it happens! I sure as hell would love to learn of these "magical" cures...... the way this article is written, they make it sound like all (or at least the majority) of IC issues are "curable"! Talk about misinformed and NOT doing a good journalistic research on the subject matter!!!

Articles like this really set me off! They also only serve to reinforce the stigma surrounding IC issues and those who need to rely on diapers/pads etc.!

Wish I lived there. I'd be sending them a "book" of sorts regarding this poor piece of journalism!

Sure, those who leak a tiny amount when sneezing/laughing etc. can easily "cure" that kind of issue, but what about the millions of us who CAN'T???

CptKirk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Honeywell6180, artemisenterri, Ashton84 and 1 other person
artemisenterri said:
What I meant was that doctors in the US are more likely to do deeper analysis than what I've seen reported for doctors in the UK.
I can attest to my Dr's going "the extra mile" in almost each and every issue I have ever encountered in life.

CptKirk
 
  • Like
Reactions: artemisenterri
CptKirk said:
well...I've been trying to be "cured" for well over 20 years now with ZERO success and now I am faced with worsening bowel issues on top of my full blown U-IC due to severe spinal stenosis and EXTREME stenosis around my Coccyx which is also causing my right leg to just "go out" without warning and ZERO control when it happens! I sure as hell would love to learn of these "magical" cures...... the way this article is written, they make it sound like all (or at least the majority) of IC issues are "curable"! Talk about misinformed and NOT doing a good journalistic research on the subject matter!!!

Articles like this really set me off! They also only serve to reinforce the stigma surrounding IC issues and those who need to rely on diapers/pads etc.!

Wish I lived there. I'd be sending them a "book" of sorts regarding this poor piece of journalism!

Sure, those who leak a tiny amount when sneezing/laughing etc. can easily "cure" that kind of issue, but what about the millions of us who CAN'T???

CptKirk
I agree. I fought for years to try to cure myself. Not successful. My wife was the one that told me to accept it and move on. Sometimes I still have a hard time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: artemisenterri
Back
Top