adult babies

NorGirlBaby

Est. Contributor
Messages
297
Role
  1. Adult Baby
I wonder if there is people that is disabled and has the mental age as an kid that actually wears diapers, get tantrums, and get pacifiers to calm down. and still playes with baby toys. some of the people with downs are childish, but i have never seen an adult with pacifier and teddy bears outside that are mental disabled.

I have never seen adults with infantil autism, sucking pacifier or using baby bottle. i have met some adults with infantil autism. They are wearing diapers and acting like little toddlers, but i have never seen the person that are with them gives them a pacifier when they are upset.

I wonder, if there is a medical needs for the items we love. like adult baby bottles and adult pacifers. or is it just like there is a marked for it cause of us.

going for an doctor check up, and the patient are an adult, but he or she is coming to the doctor office in an oversized stroller, dressed up in overall and onsie, sucking on a pacifier. and getting tantrums and being distracted with a rattle.
 

Katie2fingers

Est. Contributor
Messages
914
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Sissy
  3. Little
I'm not sure, I've never saw it in public, but there are some with mental disabilities still in diapers. I'm physically disabled and when I'm "little," sucking my pacifier and playing with my baby toys, it's like I'm not disabled at all, I'm free, it's a great feelin.
 

SicartheaSpikefan

Est. Contributor
Messages
456
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Babyfur
  3. Little
I did meet someone on a bus once who had stuffed animals and public watched a show for really little kids on her tablet... she seemed to have some sort of disability but I don't think she was a "full baby" or anything like that. there are a lot of users somewhat like that here on this site.
 

NorGirlBaby

Est. Contributor
Messages
297
Role
  1. Adult Baby
I did meet someone on a bus once who had stuffed animals and public watched a show for really little kids on her tablet... she seemed to have some sort of disability but I don't think she was a "full baby" or anything like that. there are a lot of users somewhat like that here on this site.
Yes i know. But my thoughts is it someone who is actually so diabled and regressed that they are "babies" witthout knowing they behavior is abnormal for their age. I know people with downs syndrome can be a be a big kid mentally. But is there people that have there mental aging stopping at a baby or toddlerstage and their body is still growing. I work self in healthcare, and i haven't met anyone like that. I have meg people with traumatic brain injuries that aren't fully aware of them self. People with cerebral pareses. But no adult behaving like a baby.
 

DiscreetDL

Est. Contributor
Messages
321
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
I live in New York and the state has a program call A.R.C., it doesn't stand for anything, and they deal with adults who have developmental challenges or some other mental problem and they do have people there who have the mental age of children between from as low as 1 year old and they act like children and get care from inside their communities, now there are also people within ARC who are fit to work and be employed so they get jobs working for anywhere that will hire them, usually big chain stores like Walmart where they'll do simple tasks like greeter, cart clerk etc.

At the casino I work at we employ them as stewards in the restaurants and janitorial staff and they get paid by the casino, part of their wages go to the ARC program the rest they keep and agents assigned to them make sure they don't spend it all and teach them to save some, like one guy who was autistic who made enough money from saving and investing to buy a used 2016 Corvette Z06, he couldn't drive it because he failed his driving test a few times then the state deemed him unfit to operate a vehicle but his agent/handler got to drive him around in it.
 

PurplePup89

Est. Contributor
Messages
787
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Babyfur
  3. Diaperfur
  4. Little
I used to work for a special education school which catered to teenagers and young adults with moderate to severe developmental disabilities. Though it was rare, there were indeed a couple kids I worked alongside whose behavior and demeanor were virtually identical to a toddler's. I knew one who had a similarly shuffling walk and a tendency to put things in his mouth.

Anyways, the truth unfortunately shatters whatever the idea the OP might have. Diapers are a given, they were a daily task for most employees and it was never a fun or glamorous experience. As far as stuff like pacifiers or bottles or strollers or onesies? That's an emphatic "no". These kids and young adults are still treated with the utmost respect and dignity, and treating them like or dressing them as literal babies would be the opposite of that. They're not adult babies, they're youths and adults with disabilities, and honestly, if I knew of a parent or a caregiver who did such a thing with a disabled teen or adult, I would be concerned.

What we do as age regressors is an *entirely* different world from what people with disabilities experience. When I started my job, I was actually partially worried if what I was doing would negatively impact my enjoyment of stuff like diapers and agere, but thankfully, it's a completely different experience and mindset that doesn't at all intersect. What I do with friends in onesies and ABUs and dino-shaped chicky nuggies is not at all a mirror of how disabled people live. The only time it ever crossed my mind at work is when I'd silently judge the quality of the diapers being used.

As far as toys and their medical/psychological benefits, though, I'd say yes. These youths did have "toys", but they weren't Fisher-Price baby toys as much as they were toys designed to sharpen cognitive and motor skills. If there were stuff like blocks, they wouldn't be baby blocks with baby designs, just solid colors, and used as part of their educational curriculum instead of play. I knew some kids who carried around stuffed animals, too, but I also have friends with ASD or emotional disorders who do the same and I sleep with a stuffed animal for emotional comfort unrelated to my AB/DL interests, so that's okay, too.
 

NorGirlBaby

Est. Contributor
Messages
297
Role
  1. Adult Baby
I used to work for a special education school which catered to teenagers and young adults with moderate to severe developmental disabilities. Though it was rare, there were indeed a couple kids I worked alongside whose behavior and demeanor were virtually identical to a toddler's. I knew one who had a similarly shuffling walk and a tendency to put things in his mouth.

Anyways, the truth unfortunately shatters whatever the idea the OP might have. Diapers are a given, they were a daily task for most employees and it was never a fun or glamorous experience. As far as stuff like pacifiers or bottles or strollers or onesies? That's an emphatic "no". These kids and young adults are still treated with the utmost respect and dignity, and treating them like or dressing them as literal babies would be the opposite of that. They're not adult babies, they're youths and adults with disabilities, and honestly, if I knew of a parent or a caregiver who did such a thing with a disabled teen or adult, I would be concerned.

What we do as age regressors is an *entirely* different world from what people with disabilities experience. When I started my job, I was actually partially worried if what I was doing would negatively impact my enjoyment of stuff like diapers and agere, but thankfully, it's a completely different experience and mindset that doesn't at all intersect. What I do with friends in onesies and ABUs and dino-shaped chicky nuggies is not at all a mirror of how disabled people live. The only time it ever crossed my mind at work is when I'd silently judge the quality of the diapers being used.

As far as toys and their medical/psychological benefits, though, I'd say yes. These youths did have "toys", but they weren't Fisher-Price baby toys as much as they were toys designed to sharpen cognitive and motor skills. If there were stuff like blocks, they wouldn't be baby blocks with baby designs, just solid colors, and used as part of their educational curriculum instead of play. I knew some kids who carried around stuffed animals, too, but I also have friends with ASD or emotional disorders who do the same and I sleep with a stuffed animal for emotional comfort unrelated to my AB/DL interests, so that's okay, too.
Thank you for the information
 

Katie2fingers

Est. Contributor
Messages
914
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Sissy
  3. Little
I used to work for a special education school which catered to teenagers and young adults with moderate to severe developmental disabilities. Though it was rare, there were indeed a couple kids I worked alongside whose behavior and demeanor were virtually identical to a toddler's. I knew one who had a similarly shuffling walk and a tendency to put things in his mouth.

Anyways, the truth unfortunately shatters whatever the idea the OP might have. Diapers are a given, they were a daily task for most employees and it was never a fun or glamorous experience. As far as stuff like pacifiers or bottles or strollers or onesies? That's an emphatic "no". These kids and young adults are still treated with the utmost respect and dignity, and treating them like or dressing them as literal babies would be the opposite of that. They're not adult babies, they're youths and adults with disabilities, and honestly, if I knew of a parent or a caregiver who did such a thing with a disabled teen or adult, I would be concerned.

What we do as age regressors is an *entirely* different world from what people with disabilities experience. When I started my job, I was actually partially worried if what I was doing would negatively impact my enjoyment of stuff like diapers and agere, but thankfully, it's a completely different experience and mindset that doesn't at all intersect. What I do with friends in onesies and ABUs and dino-shaped chicky nuggies is not at all a mirror of how disabled people live. The only time it ever crossed my mind at work is when I'd silently judge the quality of the diapers being used.

As far as toys and their medical/psychological benefits, though, I'd say yes. These youths did have "toys", but they weren't Fisher-Price baby toys as much as they were toys designed to sharpen cognitive and motor skills. If there were stuff like blocks, they wouldn't be baby blocks with baby designs, just solid colors, and used as part of their educational curriculum instead of play. I knew some kids who carried around stuffed animals, too, but I also have friends with ASD or emotional disorders who do the same and I sleep with a stuffed animal for emotional comfort unrelated to my AB/DL interests, so that's okay, too.
I think one of the reasons I play with baby toys, and they are Fisher-price toys is that I don't have fine motor skills. It makes me feel like I'm not disabled when I'm playing because I regress to the level of an infant that matches not having fine motor skills. Does that make sense PurplePup?
 

PurplePup89

Est. Contributor
Messages
787
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
  2. Babyfur
  3. Diaperfur
  4. Little
I think one of the reasons I play with baby toys, and they are Fisher-price toys is that I don't have fine motor skills. It makes me feel like I'm not disabled when I'm playing because I regress to the level of an infant that matches not having fine motor skills. Does that make sense PurplePup?
Yeah, and I'm not against that. If I was in a position to play with such toys, I probably would. I was mostly responding in reference to the OP's post about how they relate to disabled people; age regression is an entirely different thing which has nothing to do with disability or pretending to be disabled, just regressing back to a younger age, and such things as infant toys are perfectly acceptable.
 

NorGirlBaby

Est. Contributor
Messages
297
Role
  1. Adult Baby
Thank you. I got answered what i was wondered about. I am not disabled or mentally regressed. But i enoying beeing diapered up. And just feel like a toddler. I am eating my pancakes now wearing a winniethepooh bib and onsie and a comfy pj pants diapered up.
 

SpAzpieSweeTot

Insensitivity about disability sparks salt!
Est. Contributor
Messages
2,470
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Little
  3. Incontinent
It's really disrespectful to treat disabled people like babies without even asking for their consent, and yes, it should be asked for, always.

Infantile autism doesn't fly, in America, nor Canada, and it shouldn't fly anywhere! The inability to speak, doesn't mean a person has an infant's mind.

The things nonverbal, or limited-speech Autists do, seem infantile, because, when highly emotional, the senses go offline, and things like biting and hitting, usually, themselves, actually gives just enough pressure to reset what's happening to their bodies. It has a purpose, and it's not very often to injure themselves. It's usually a reset button.

Now, If the hitting, biting, throwing, or whatever, is toward someone else, that's usually frustration, not feeble-mindedness.

Also, infants are infant's. They're new to the planet, not idiots.

Disabled people are disabled, not stupid.
 
Last edited:

NorGirlBaby

Est. Contributor
Messages
297
Role
  1. Adult Baby
I notice it is very easy to start to talk childish to person that Are mentally disabled. I know about my self, I speak more to the person that are with the mental disabled person, than to the person himself. I am working on getting better at that. I was a patient myself. I was into gastrocopi and it was terrible to hear the nurse and the doctor talked over my head about me and the doctor asked the nurse questions about me i knew better, but i could not answer cause of the cameratube down my throath. I start to talk to the mental disabled person but then the assistend to the person is answering so it is like a reflex i starts to talk to them instead of. I know it is wrong of me, and i am really working on having the focus on the mentally disabled person.
 

SpAzpieSweeTot

Insensitivity about disability sparks salt!
Est. Contributor
Messages
2,470
Role
  1. Adult Baby
  2. Little
  3. Incontinent
I notice it is very easy to start to talk childish to person that Are mentally disabled. I know about my self, I speak more to the person that are with the mental disabled person, than to the person himself. I am working on getting better at that. I was a patient myself. I was into gastrocopi and it was terrible to hear the nurse and the doctor talked over my head about me and the doctor asked the nurse questions about me i knew better, but i could not answer cause of the cameratube down my throath. I start to talk to the mental disabled person but then the assistend to the person is answering so it is like a reflex i starts to talk to them instead of. I know it is wrong of me, and i am really working on having the focus on the mentally disabled person.
Now, I get what you're asking. There are times when I think a paci might help, but most people it would help, would refuse it.

There are other things, like chewelry, that can be used, instead of a paci. I know one mom of a severe Autie, who was glad when he discovered thumb-sucking, because she didn't have to be there to sooth him, constantly. There was one Autie, who had multiple trips to the hospital, because people kept saying he needed to be off the sippy cup, and he would drink if he got thirsty enough. Apparently not, because he had multiple trips to the hospital, and maybe, just maybe, judgmental people need to stop.

You mentioned autism, specifically. Understand, Autistics are not mentally deficient, barring having something else that actually damages the brain. Autism, doesn't damage the brain. It re-wires it. Auties' senses can be heightened, to the point where it's hard to show, what they know. Always talk to the disabled person, as if there's a functional brain in the person's and skull. if the person with them says they don't understand, do they really know that? How?
 
Last edited:

3bsg3

Est. Contributor
Messages
64
Role
  1. Diaper Lover
This is my sister actually. She's mentally disabled, still wears nappies, sucked on dummies and drank out of beaker cups until she was 16 and has MAJOR tantrums. No baby toys, but she always has to have a ball with her, juggling it back and forth her hands calms her.
 
Top