ABUniverse and their stock...

Llayden

Est. Contributor
Messages
937
Role
Diaper Lover, Incontinent
If that is an accurate representation, we'd still need to know whether that numbering is used across all locations or is warehouse specific. They have two US warehouses, Canada, UK, and Japan as well in the mix.
Oh yes, for sure! It is a simple and expedient way of gathering some data. But I agree, I do not think it is in any way the most accurate representation. There are many factors that are not included, and the sample size far too small.
 

ABdrew

Est. Contributor
Messages
290
Role
Adult Baby
My fav diaper is ABU SDK, I almost wear 24/7 so I order big amounts. I went to order a cartoon this week and the Australia web page was not working properly. I got into the diaper flaster wanting diapers asap. Then I decided I recently when to Littles Down Under store which is an ABDL store near me. I purchased some diapers, the service was great and every thing was in stock. So I when to Littles Down Under and got diapers and was a very happy little guy.

Sorry ABU that things are going wrong, but when you need diapers there is nothing worse then not being able to get them.

Also now that ABU is charging extra for postage there getting way to experience. 1 med 10 pack of SDKs works out at around $58, that's $5.80 a diaper. In US dollars that's $8.37
A 1/2 cartoon of 40 diapers is $123, that's $3.07 a diaper. In US soldiers that's $4.43.
I under stand postage is not cheap for a business, but in the last year the price for SDK's has gone up considerably making them very unaffordable yet Aust Post has not increased its rates.
 
Last edited:

bambinod

Est. Contributor
Messages
8,721
Role
Diaper Lover
I've also looked at order sequence numbers a few times and wonderedif that was a good way to guess order volume. Maybe, maybe not.

A bit of WW2 history: the allies were worried about not knowing the number of tanks that germany was manufacturing, and so they created a team to go inspect destroyed german tanks to see if they could get a clue as to how fast germany was building them. The team discovered that every german tank had a serial number on it and that the formula was pretty simple to figure out. This allowed them to very accurately estimate how many tanks they were building every month, and the number turned out to be a much smaller amount than they were expecting. (germany emphasized quality over quantity, the opposite of say, the russians) This allowed the allies to adjust their battle strategies because they could then estimate how many tanks the germans had available to commit to battle, based on how many had been manufactured recently. This way they could spread their resources more efficiently across different fronts without worrying too much about being overmatched.

If the germans had realized how useful this information was going to be to the allies, they would have used a different serial number strategy, to disguise the rate of manufacture. (for example, by adding 7 to the sequence instead of 1, for each unit that rolled off the line, or randomly changing the increment between 1 and 9 on a daily basis) Seeing as this is a lesson that was learned almost a century ago, "shopping cart" designers today may be taking similar steps to hide the rate of sales since that may be valuable information to the competition.
 

babybobby

Est. Contributor
Messages
577
Role
Adult Baby, Diaper Lover
I've also looked at order sequence numbers a few times and wonderedif that was a good way to guess order volume. Maybe, maybe not.

A bit of WW2 history: the allies were worried about not knowing the number of tanks that germany was manufacturing, and so they created a team to go inspect destroyed german tanks to see if they could get a clue as to how fast germany was building them. The team discovered that every german tank had a serial number on it and that the formula was pretty simple to figure out. This allowed them to very accurately estimate how many tanks they were building every month, and the number turned out to be a much smaller amount than they were expecting. (germany emphasized quality over quantity, the opposite of say, the russians) This allowed the allies to adjust their battle strategies because they could then estimate how many tanks the germans had available to commit to battle, based on how many had been manufactured recently. This way they could spread their resources more efficiently across different fronts without worrying too much about being overmatched.

If the germans had realized how useful this information was going to be to the allies, they would have used a different serial number strategy, to disguise the rate of manufacture. (for example, by adding 7 to the sequence instead of 1, for each unit that rolled off the line, or randomly changing the increment between 1 and 9 on a daily basis) Seeing as this is a lesson that was learned almost a century ago, "shopping cart" designers today may be taking similar steps to hide the rate of sales since that may be valuable information to the competition.
Can confirm as a former e-commerce business owner. My shopping cart was set to +7 increments of invoices, and I started at 3000
 

BabyTyrant

Est. Contributor
Messages
2,517
Role
Diaper Lover
And yet another topic about the same problem

Yes I know they are often out of stock

But it is not "literally" all the time like people like to act

It's a matter of checking back often and buying as soon as you see they are in stock of what you want

Then you have an order coming (hopefully enough to last a while) and then you dont have to complain they are out of stock

How do they stay in business? By selling out often

They make a profit on everything they sell and some people buy multiple cases at a time

I have even heard of people buying 5 cases of PeekABU at once; yes (almost) $1000 for 400 Diapers

That is a good problem to have and it sound like they are planning to expand, so it shouldn't be as bad in the near future

Also part of their problem with stock is it take 1.5-2+ months just in shipment from China to the US, so that's a big part of why they are out of stock for months at times, because they sell out almost immediately and it takes months for a new batch to get made (a batch being probably as much as 100,000s of Diapers) and 1.5-2+ months just in shipping

The only way to be absolutely sure that doesn't happen is to become the manufacturer; which is quite costly (literally millions of USD to start up).

And also anyone complaining about pricing

The unfortunate reality is that the smaller the Quantity you order, the higher the % of sales the company makes has to go towards shipping

If I shipped out a 10 pack of Diapers I would probably be paying $15-$20 in shipping alone; and if I was a company I am not gonna eat that amount of money on a 10 pack of Diapers, I have to at least pass along a fair amount of that cost to the customer (if not the full cost, depending on my profit margin)

Now if I ship 80 of those same Diapers (8 Times the quantity) my shipping cost is probably in the $25-$35 area so I would only be looking at $15-$20 difference to sell 8 times the amount of Diapers and I can charge a much lower price on my Diapers and have a higher profit margin

This may be a harsh reality; but it is still reality and if you want the cheapest price per diaper you have to order in whole cases at a time, even a half case will cost a fair amount more per diaper

I could order a 10 pack of Preschools for around $30 or I could order a case of PeekABU for around $200, the PeekABUs are probably 3x as good as preschools, so I get much better value spending 7 times the money on 8 times the number of much more absorbent Diapers.

It sounds like prices are higher in Australia too, unfortunate; but also Harsh Reality
 
Last edited:
Top