AB Documentary?

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EllaWhispers

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It is a wonderful thought/idea...but I fear as so many good intentions go, it would become fodder for others to use against the AB community instead. And I really worry about how those who participate might be hurt or harmed as a result...

Ella
 

Garzilla

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It is a wonderful thought/idea...but I fear as so many good intentions go, it would become fodder for others to use against the AB community instead. And I really worry about how those who participate might be hurt or harmed as a result...

Ella

Yea, this is one of the three reasons I have not taken on such a project myself. I do believe a properly produced documentary could be both successful at the box office and successfully meet the objective of creating good will for the community.

Of course there will always be those who will disagree and there could be some fallout. I do feel, however, as the community naturally grows we still have more misunderstandings and misconceptions that develop and evolve among those who are not into diapers.

A documentary often has the power of third party advice in that it is way more often trusted, especially if the content is presented in a professional and sensitive manner. Many, many people will take these productions as valid and will openly accept the assertions that are made. So I believe a documentary is likely to do more good than harm.

I will make the AB/DL/diaper community a promise that if I am ever in a financial situation to produce a proper documentary that I will set aside my own personal fears and that I will produce the work in the most sensitive, most professional, most scientific manner possible. I will likely tie the work to the book I am already writing regarding a topic closely tied to childhood development.
 

Dark Bringer

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I'm taking part in a documentary that is currently being produced in the uk

I heard about a documentary being produced by people in the UK pretty recently. I believe the title is called Forever Young. It sounds like that's the one you will be in, correct?

I think for something like this to be successful, it has to be done by people either in the kink community or independent enough that they aren't going to sensationalize stuff for ratings.
 

pajamakitten

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I heard about a documentary being produced by people in the UK pretty recently. I believe the title is called Forever Young. It sounds like that's the one you will be in, correct?

I think for something like this to be successful, it has to be done by people either in the kink community or independent enough that they aren't going to sensationalize stuff for ratings.

In fairness if this is for the BBC then that is what we'd get because they know how to make a good and unbiased documentary to the point where Louis Theroux was shown to actually be very neutral in his about the Westboro Baptist Church, if this is for ITV or Channel 4 it will be sensationalised (and crap as well).
 

Prussic_aux

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I honestly don't think that a documentary will change the general public's perception of the lifestyle even in the slightest. No matter what anybody on this forum or elsewhere has said, to the general public - we are far from normal, and any attraction which has even the most extremely remote connection to children is going to be viewed as dangerous by Joe Six-Pack. I cannot think of many (if any) documentaries on alternative sexual stuff (unrelated to AB/DL) that hasn't made me go "wow that's messed up". I might be more accepting of it due to what I do behind closed doors, but it still hasn't changed my opinion.

To me, a documentary should have the goal of presenting the facts on the matter and let the audience make up their own minds. Anything else would be a great embarrassment for us.
 

Garzilla

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I honestly don't think that a documentary will change the general public's perception of the lifestyle even in the slightest. No matter what anybody on this forum or elsewhere has said, to the general public - we are far from normal, and any attraction which has even the most extremely remote connection to children is going to be viewed as dangerous by Joe Six-Pack. I cannot think of many (if any) documentaries on alternative sexual stuff (unrelated to AB/DL) that hasn't made me go "wow that's messed up". I might be more accepting of it due to what I do behind closed doors, but it still hasn't changed my opinion.

To me, a documentary should have the goal of presenting the facts on the matter and let the audience make up their own minds. Anything else would be a great embarrassment for us.

You never know. I remember when Gay was a huge taboo and there have been tremendous efforts over easily the past 30 years that have paid off well. So it is possible. If done correctly I see no reason why there would not be a positive impact among some viewers.
 

babybluejay

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I think that it's a matter of who the intended audience is. If an accurate, non-biased, and language-sensitive documentary was released to the general public, it might not be perceived for what it is worth. However, the same documentary might be viewed differently if the film was strictly syndicated among the academic community. Perhaps then a documentary would be effective. I think ultimately film is not the best medium to convey information on the subject; written materials such as books, given the occasion, tend to attract more open audiences.
 

Garzilla

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I think that it's a matter of who the intended audience is. If an accurate, non-biased, and language-sensitive documentary was released to the general public, it might not be perceived for what it is worth. However, the same documentary might be viewed differently if the film was strictly syndicated among the academic community. Perhaps then a documentary would be effective. I think ultimately film is not the best medium to convey information on the subject; written materials such as books, given the occasion, tend to attract more open audiences.

Of course the intended audience has to be carefully considered. I do see an academic screening as being potentially useful however that would be an entirely different sort of production.

If I were to engage on such a project I would most definitely target the more artistically inclined crowd along with the more open minded deeper thinker. I do not see it as a potential general distribution target.

I agree that written materials, such as the book I am actively writing, tend to be more favorable for this sort of audience. The thought of a documentary really ends up being an interesting conversation on what it would look like and could it be done.
 
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BabyJayk

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I think most documentaries we have had on the subject of AB/DL have taken us in the opposite direction of social acceptance. Because they do kind of paint us as a bunch of social outcasts with other things that set us apart from the general population apart from AB/DL. The reason for this is that controversy sells and no self respecting modern journalist or documentarian is going to waste time by interviewing average joe, who just happens to wear diapers at home with his wife. No, they are going to interview the person who is 24/7 and goes about in the community as an open AB/DL, someone they can paint as slightly insane, just to get viewers.

I think if an AB or DL made a documentary about us and somehow managed to get it on the air one day, it might be a step in the right direction, but we cannot trust the media to tell our story. Look what happened to Stanley, or Baby Ella for Christ's sake.
 
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There is a big problem with a world wide AB Documentary, as the terms are not the same for everyone so its just not going to work, its more of a like that we change in to the things we like and add it to our lives, some its a fetish, some its a means to relax, some its a adiction, some its a means to feel loved, some its all of these and to others its other things, if I see another TV show about it I think I am going to be sick as they always make us out to be a sexual monster or freak and really we don't need that kind of view on out lifes.

Like BabyJayk said we can't trust the media for one, AB is such a open term these days all kinds of people from all kinds of walks of life are in to it, before it was mostly westen and jap side of the world as we used diapers part of the world that didn't this seen still to this day is rare, I think it just needs to be rethought and re done from scratch to have any way to move forward.
 

Garzilla

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I think most documentaries we have had on the subject of AB/DL have taken us in the opposite direction of social acceptance. Because they do kind of paint us as a bunch of social outcasts with other things that set us apart from the general population apart from AB/DL. The reason for this is that controversy sells and no self respecting modern journalist or documentarian is going to waste time by interviewing average joe, who just happens to wear diapers at home with his wife. No, they are going to interview the person who is 24/7 and goes about in the community as an open AB/DL, someone they can paint as slightly insane, just to get viewers.

I think if an AB or DL made a documentary about us and somehow managed to get it on the air one day, it might be a step in the right direction, but we cannot trust the media to tell our story. Look what happened to Stanley, or Baby Ella for Christ's sake.

Very true, many of the documentaries that have been created take us in the wrong direction. The problem is that these commercial productions are done with the idea of viewership, ratings and profit.

If the project were to be undertaken from an independent or even inside perspective, having no motive to accomplish anything other than to inform, the results would likely be far different. Instead of trying to create a sensation approach it as the building of a bridge.

The impact on participants would also have to be a huge consideration and I am really not sure this can be properly reconciled. So ultimately this might be the biggest roadblock.
 

Biteycub

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Apologies if this has already been covered, but..

This has been a running theme in the furry community for quite some time. While there have been many documentaries (or other types media) produced, few if any have portrayed it in anything most us of us would call an accurate manner. The overwhelming tendency is, as is the complaint here, to focus on the few sensational aspects rather than the rest.

While I do share the loathing most here have for the inaccurate or skewed presentation of either community, it really comes down to the core goal of documentary making for the mass media; wide-scale appeal. As an example, take rubbernecking at a car accident - most (if not all) of us have turned their heads for a look in that circumstance, but I'll wager few would take anywhere near as much interest in details such as where the driver happened to be going to at the time. For the driver, this is probably a big deal - late for work or worse - and the same can be said for the ABDL; our inner motivation for behaving in such an unusual manner to most is far less interesting than the action itself.

As with furry, many have discussed the wish for a documentary which illustrates the community in an accurate light, and sadly I think that many typical viewers would simply end up changing the channel. Hardly the kind of thing a network would find desirable to broadcast.
 

Garzilla

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Apologies if this has already been covered, but..

This has been a running theme in the furry community for quite some time. While there have been many documentaries (or other types media) produced, few if any have portrayed it in anything most us of us would call an accurate manner. The overwhelming tendency is, as is the complaint here, to focus on the few sensational aspects rather than the rest.

While I do share the loathing most here have for the inaccurate or skewed presentation of either community, it really comes down to the core goal of documentary making for the mass media; wide-scale appeal. As an example, take rubbernecking at a car accident - most (if not all) of us have turned their heads for a look in that circumstance, but I'll wager few would take anywhere near as much interest in details such as where the driver happened to be going to at the time. For the driver, this is probably a big deal - late for work or worse - and the same can be said for the ABDL; our inner motivation for behaving in such an unusual manner to most is far less interesting than the action itself.

As with furry, many have discussed the wish for a documentary which illustrates the community in an accurate light, and sadly I think that many typical viewers would simply end up changing the channel. Hardly the kind of thing a network would find desirable to broadcast.

Of course there is a conflict between the needs of the community and the typical needs of a producer. Remove the need to create sensation and count it as good if even a few viewers tune in. I do believe a compelling story can be told in a way that people will want to watch. Maybe it only makes it to a documentary network, or maybe it is screened at Sundance. Either way there is exposure and if the story is accurate and compelling it will have the intended result.
 
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