Military dealings with bedwetters.

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MonteDriver93

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So I remembered when I was filling out some paper work for the army draft thing I was going through medical conditions that I would need to check if I had. One of them was bedwetting. So my question is what does the army or basically any of the military do with bedwetters? do they not let them in or something else? I had decided on not going into the military for just that reason of not knowing. at the time my bedwetting had finally stopped but I wasnt sure if it was going to stay stopped. Hmmm.
 

Lestat

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You know stress of being in the Military might restart the bed wetting How are the other recruits & officers going to act. I believe the way they run Military is they tear down the recruits then build them back up.
 

reddawn2988

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I remember having to sign a form that stated I ceased bed-wetting before the age of 16 in order to enlist. I know I hesitated a bit myself when initialing beside the statement as I had not completely stopped wetting. That was during the surge though so they were taking nearly anyone that didn't have a violent felony or a missing kidney. I fairly certain that the military, at least the US one, will not accept constant bed-wetters due to hygienic purposes. They don't want to have to deal with supplying plastic sheets and diapers along with bullets, beans and band-aids. In some instances you'll actually time-share beds with another person and you'll likely always be in close quarters with other folks. I know my roommate found out I wet the bed occasionally and quite frequently when drunk. He was pretty understanding and sometimes poked fun at me while we were alone but I shudder to think what would have happened if he were less understanding.
 
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littlelodgewrecker

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#4
i was a bed-wetter for many years as a kid. clear up through 8th grade and into early high school some times.
but to be honest, when i joined the navy i never gave my past problems any thought at all..... though if i had known what the conditions i was volunteering to serve under i might have been very worried about my childhood wetting habits.

you see, on submarines, most all of us "hot-racked"...... which means to crawl into a bunk that someone else just crawled out of. the bunk never cools off while out at sea. it wasn't until i got my dolphins and made E-4 that i won my own personal rack on the boat.... and it wasn't what one would call a great one either.

on the other hand, thinking back on the whole experience..... i no longer had a leaking problem by that time. but if i had i am not sure that the smell would have been noticed. after even a few days out a fast-attack gets to be a pretty nasty smelly situation as there are a lot of guys in a very small place.

i would caution anyone thinking of joining the military that one of the most common duties everyone stands is/are long watch/guard duty. this could mean standing a post for many hours at a time (2 or 4 to 8) with out any chance to relieve ones self. these sorts of watches always go to junior enlisted people.

just some thoughts.....
 

oleman72

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#5
It was so long ago that I was in I don't remember signing any forms for bed wetting. I know during basic training we didn't get many latrine breaks during the day.
Anybody who was a bed wetter would have had to sleep in wet sheets as we only got clean sheets once a week.
 

kennyrallen

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#6
It was so long ago that I was in I don't remember signing any forms for bed wetting. I know during basic training we didn't get many latrine breaks during the day.
Anybody who was a bed wetter would have had to sleep in wet sheets as we only got clean sheets once a week.
They didn't ask that even in 1969 when I enlisted. Mine wasn't real bad then , about 1 or 2 times a month. Most from stress. There were 3 of us in basic training who did.

My physical to enlist was the same day as the Motor City Madman's was.
 
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acorn

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#7
There were 3 of us in basic training who did.
Given the year with the escalating needs of Nam looming in the bigger picture; I’d say you would have gotten away with urinating down the Recruiting Sergeants leg while on the Square. If I recall correctly, the “peace out, crowd” had started and were soon swelling in numbers.


Must know:
Routinely no military will entertain bed-wetting. Diapers and such are not part of the CQMS dry stores inventory.

Might Know:
Exception to the above rule would only occur if you had something that the military felt it really needed and they could not find elsewhere. An example is given above, or another might be if you truly were the third coming of Christ.

No need to fucking know.
 

jinxed

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#8
My basic I recall one individual who had a constant problem and wet the bed nearly every night. He didn't have a problem and the instructors just made sure he had new sheets. Few others, myself included on but 1 occasion, wet the bed once here or there.....we just made do how we could without drawing too much attention to ourselves.
 

JOCKMAN

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They didn't ask that even in 1969 when I enlisted. Mine wasn't real bad then , about 1 or 2 times a month. Most from stress. There were 3 of us in basic training who did.

My physical to enlist was the same day as the Motor City Madman's was.
Very cool! Went into the service with Ted Nugent? I did not know he even served....or maybe I read your post incorrectly? Jockman
 
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#11
You know stress of being in the Military might restart the bed wetting How are the other recruits & officers going to act. I believe the way they run Military is they tear down the recruits then build them back up.
Used to be I can look at my dad basic training and a cousins who's was way different they have to be nice now.
 

ade

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#12
when i did my basic, the instruction was to mention to the QM staff if your issued mattress was stained. mine was, but my mentioning of it was dismissed with a 'just turn it over'. i pretty much knew that i was going to be screwed when the time came to hand it back. they (or rather, one corporal) tried it, but i stood my ground, despite the implied threat of beatings, which seemed to shock them.

the accommodation was quite modern, with cubicles/bed-spaces for all your gear, so you could've hidden any 'mistakes'. but, the general equipment was ancient, some of it from the forties, so you could've been blamed for anything, by anyone over the previous decades.
 

WildRoseBaby

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Littleman

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As a current navy recruiter, the medical form you speak of is a 2807/2 and it asks have you wet the bed since age 13, it is an automatic disquailifier for entry into the navy so if your looking to enter the military best to keep past bed wetting issues on the DL, if you get cought in boot camp they will separate you after the second or third time, can't speak for the rest of the branches but that's what's up with the navy
 
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acorn

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As a current navy recruiter, the medical form you speak of is a 2807/2 and it asks have you wet the bed since age 13, it is an automatic disquailifier for entry into the navy so if your looking to enter the military best to keep past bed wetting issues on the DL, if you get cought in boot camp they will separate you after the second or third time, can't speak for the rest of the branches but that's what's up with the navy
Matter of interest, the form 2807/2. Can you tell us is it a "standard armed forces form" or is it specifically a navy form?

If you can differentiate between the two it may betray the other branches stance on the issue.

For outright fact the Irish Armed Forces will reject such an applicant, on that alone.
Secondly I do know of a situation where it was used to reject a recruit to HMS Irish Guards, there was a little more to that story but it was bedwetting that "done him in" in the end.
 

Honeywell6180

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#16
Actually, Ted Nugent got a student deferment. Then later, he was classified as eligible for military service, but only during a war or national emergency (a 1-Y classification). The rules changed in 1972, where his rating was changed to a 4-F. I have my doubts about the High Times writing, and can be reasonably skeptical of the story's validity. Had Nugent really exhibited the behavior specified in the article, I am sure he would have been involuntarily committed to an institution and would probably not be eligible to own a gun without jumping quite a few hoops (psychiatric examinations, psychological testing, all that stuff).

Some information can be found on this link: snopes.com: Ted Nugent Dodged the Draft?

These days, military service is only an option, not a requirement. And, there are plenty of volunteers without the need for a draft. They can be highly selective, with strict physical requirements and an age limit not unlike that of what's required of an air traffic controller. With that said, any form on incontinence will very likely result in a denial. Also, I learned that people who are on the autism spectrum would not be eligible to join, so I would have been ruled out just for that one issue.
 
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#17
Actually, Ted Nugent got a student deferment. Then later, he was classified as eligible for military service, but only during a war or national emergency (a 1-Y classification). The rules changed in 1972, where his rating was changed to a 4-F. I have my doubts about the High Times writing, and can be reasonably skeptical of the story's validity. Had Nugent really exhibited the behavior specified in the article, I am sure he would have been involuntarily committed to an institution and would probably not be eligible to own a gun without jumping quite a few hoops (psychiatric examinations, psychological testing, all that stuff).

Some information can be found on this link: snopes.com: Ted Nugent Dodged the Draft?

These days, military service is only an option, not a requirement. And, there are plenty of volunteers without the need for a draft. They can be highly selective, with strict physical requirements and an age limit not unlike that of what's required of an air traffic controller. With that said, any form on incontinence will very likely result in a denial. Also, I learned that people who are on the autism spectrum would not be eligible to join, so I would have been ruled out just for that one issue.

i guess i would be ruled out too then i have mild autism but i also have sever ADHD meaning i dont deal with pressure and stressfull situations very well. i would probabably be more of a hinderance than benificial in an army uniform.
 

kennyrallen

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#18
Very cool! Went into the service with Ted Nugent? I did not know he even served....or maybe I read your post incorrectly? Jockman
Ted Nugent didn't serve his brother did thou. Ted showed up in crappy underwear, he had been cropping in for a week and got deferred for mental reasons.
 

kennyrallen

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#20
The story of Ted's draft relates to this thread. Before he went in for induction he stopped changing his clothes, showering and pulling down his pants to pee and poop. They decided he was not suitable.

Patriotic American Ted Nugent Shit His Pants to Avoid the Draft
Not only were his pants full of shit but so is his story. He never made it to any of he test they pulled him off to the side right away and sent him on his why. The people doing the test were civilians not military.

His nick name that day was Theodore New shit.

This happened on April 9, 1969, I was 17 at the the time.
 
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