24/7’s Where are you disposing your dirty diapers ?

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HappyNotHappy

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#1
The biggest obstacle I’m facing in going 24/7 is disposal. My dirty diapers are thick and heavy. Where I live we have a very limited amount of space in the trash cans provided by the land lord and town. It’s looking like it’ll be pretty much impossible to get rid of 4-6 diapers a day, that’s 120-180 diapers a month. Also I’m feeling guilty about what I’m doing to the environment.

How are you all dealing with this? What is you’re disposal routine? I know my desire to be diapered will never go away but this is a serious issue :(
 

Pongoandperdi15

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#2
I'm incontinent so stuck in a nappy 24/7 so by law in the UK my local authority has to provide me with a way for disposing of medical appliances
 

Slomo

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#3
The biggest obstacle I’m facing in going 24/7 is disposal. My dirty diapers are thick and heavy. Where I live we have a very limited amount of space in the trash cans provided by the land lord and town. It’s looking like it’ll be pretty much impossible to get rid of 4-6 diapers a day, that’s 120-180 diapers a month. Also I’m feeling guilty about what I’m doing to the environment.

How are you all dealing with this? What is you’re disposal routine? I know my desire to be diapered will never go away but this is a serious issue :(
With most places you can request a seperate disposal means for medical supplies/waste (not to be confused with hazardous medical waste). Often this is just another trash can.

And don't feel bad about it. Disposables are no worse for the environment than cloth is. Think about it. Plastic is made from oil that would otherwise normally get burned and released as CO2, or end up a pollution in our waterways. Except after diapers are used they almost always get thrown out (hopefully), and sequestered right back into the ground at the local dump.

On the other hand, cotton strips the land of nutrients while it absorbs that CO2. Which then gets replaced by all the CO2 produced by machinery and trucking that's needed to add the nutrients back in. Now add in all the detergents used for washing cloth diapers too. Yeah, not environmentally healthy.

Don't get me wrong here. I'm not saying disposables are good for the environment (they are still manufactured after all), just that neither of them are.

If you really want to feel better about it, buy your next car with a really high gas milage, or add solar panels to your roof (I've done both). The key is to offset your overal environmentl impact, not dillude yourself into thinking you're putting out less.
 

HappyNotHappy

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#4
Thank you Slomo, that’s good advice and insight. I don’t currently have a medical need for diapers but if I stay on this path I do realize I could end up diaper dependent. I’m not overly concerned about that possibility, I figure I’ll cross that bridge if or when I come to it. I’m not sure I’m ready to out myself to the town with a request for medical disposal.

Being an DL certainly isn’t all fun and games, So much to consider and think about moving forward.
 

Slomo

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#5
Thank you Slomo, that’s good advice and insight. I don’t currently have a medical need for diapers but if I stay on this path I do realize I could end up diaper dependent. I’m not overly concerned about that possibility, I figure I’ll cross that bridge if or when I come to it. I’m not sure I’m ready to out myself to the town with a request for medical disposal.

Being an DL certainly isn’t all fun and games, So much to consider and think about moving forward.
Another point of though for you. A mental need IS a medical need, and is no less important than a physical need.

And it can't hurt to check on what requirements you'd have to get that extra bin. It might not even be any different than your regular trash bins, or require any kind of outing (though it may).
 
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#7
As far as disposing of diapers just get yourself some of those plastic grocery bags snag a good chunk of them from the check out bag area take them home and each diaper change use one of them get the air out of the bag by squeezing it tight and then tying the handles to make a compact piece of trash unless you are fecal incontinent then with a top of the line diaper you should only need to change 2 times in a day max I drink about a gallon of water a day in various forms from coffee to water and the water from cooking my veggies too and a bottle of soda with a top of the line diaper having a gallon capacity as I said 2 at the most diapers a day a 3rd for sleeping 8 hours. other than that it should not take up that much space in your trash. Just saying. Now if you want to talk about how to maximize your trash can space i can speak from experience in the food service & retail business.
Rinse your tin cans out and cut off both ends and place both ends in the can and squash the can down into a flat thing. Bottles like bleach and milk and laundry detergent can be flattened also take top off place on floor and stomp the heck out of it and it will be flatter than a pancake! As far as magazines rip them into 4 and it will be smaller in your trash bag also food boxes can either be flattened or cereal boxes can be rolled and made to fit better in a trash bag. invest in a garbage disposal for food waste let that stuff do thru the sanitary sewer system not in your trash. Bones or pits or eggshells always go in trash. Now as far as other househiold trash you can invent your own ways to minimize and maximize space in your trash. If possible combine things together to get more out of it too. some things can be re purposed into storage containers or other things. The ole saying is more than one way to skin a cat. Now as far as recycling a good portion of it never gets recycled it just goes straight to landfills contrary to popular belief.
 

sloth

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#9
i just use the bin though by the end of the week is it very heavy. 2-3 nappies a day 18 to 21 nappies in the bin a week. I sometime just place them in the car and when getting petrol or go shopping just place it in the bins there. 4-6 nappies a day I would be changing brand as most days i can get by with 2 Betterdrys or northshore
 

HappyNotHappy

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#10
I don’t believe changing brands would matter, I drink over a gallon of water a day and the medication I take to block my testosterone makes me pee so much. No matter how good the diaper is I’d still be walking around with a thick heavy pee soaked pillow between my legs with just 2-3 per day .
 

dogboy

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#11
I would be careful about announcing you have medical waste to dispose. I'm sure all states and municipalities or different, but where I live, disposing of medical waste was a $500.00 a month charge by the garbage disposal department. My wife did home dialysis for 10 years and we were instructed to double bag the lines in black trash bags so as to not get discovered because of the monthly charge. Diapers may be very different than blood born products though.
 

Slomo

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#12
I would be careful about announcing you have medical waste to dispose. I'm sure all states and municipalities or different, but where I live, disposing of medical waste was a $500.00 a month charge by the garbage disposal department. My wife did home dialysis for 10 years and we were instructed to double bag the lines in black trash bags so as to not get discovered because of the monthly charge. Diapers may be very different than blood born products though.
You're thinking of hazardous medical waste. The diabetic needles need a different method of disposal than just what diapers do. (My wife is also diabetic, and has a special sharps disposal)

Every municipality is different though, and even just getting a second standard bin may be easy with no special declaration- yet still cost more (or not). The OP will just need to check.
 
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#13
You're thinking of hazardous medical waste. The diabetic needles need a different method of disposal than just what diapers do. (My wife is also diabetic, and has a special sharps disposal)

Every municipality is different though, and even just getting a second standard bin may be easy with no special declaration- yet still cost more (or not). The OP will just need to check.
Any Doc office or Hospital can take the sharps or pharmacy they also can dispose those for you too you would think anyways.
 

dogboy

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#14
You're thinking of hazardous medical waste. The diabetic needles need a different method of disposal than just what diapers do. (My wife is also diabetic, and has a special sharps disposal)

Every municipality is different though, and even just getting a second standard bin may be easy with no special declaration- yet still cost more (or not). The OP will just need to check.
Actually, we had a needle box for the sharps which we took back to the dialysis center. What we disposed of were the plastic lines and the plastic artificial kidney, all made out of plastic. After dialysis is finished, you rinse the blood back that's left in the tubing and kidney using sterile saline from a bag. Even though it rinses back most of the blood, there's always a little left and that got disposed of with the lines and kidney. Our city didn't allow blood put in the garbage.
 

Slomo

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#15
Actually, we had a needle box for the sharps which we took back to the dialysis center. What we disposed of were the plastic lines and the plastic artificial kidney, all made out of plastic. After dialysis is finished, you rinse the blood back that's left in the tubing and kidney using sterile saline from a bag. Even though it rinses back most of the blood, there's always a little left and that got disposed of with the lines and kidney. Our city didn't allow blood put in the garbage.
Correct, blood is considered to be harzadous medical waste. Diapers (adult or baby) are not considered hazardous.
 

alwayz

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#16
I rarely wear disposables, I wear cloth diapers and wash them when the basket is getting full. I rinse them out in warm water to keep the smell down just like my mom did.
 
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