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Thread: Psychiatrist (If thats how u spell it)

  1. #1

    Question Psychiatrist (If thats how u spell it)

    How can I tell my parents I want to see I psychiatrist. There are some things that I really need to talk to someone about and I dont know who to talk to them about. I know my parents probably wont go for it since we probably cant afford it, but I want to know if there are any ways to ask your parents about seeing one?

  2. #2

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    It's not that much of a fight they can put against......
    I mean all people need someone to talk to .. My parents have suggested I see one. There's alot of drama in my family and they thought that I needed to let some of it out. I keep alot of stuff bottled up. If you can't win them over say your suicidal or something. Psychiatrist are good people to talk to like in my case if i talked to one they would be neutral on situations in my family. They won't be biased when giving me advice. Also you don't have to worry about them telling over people... So yeah if money is the only big issue you might be able to convince them. Maybe.

  3. #3
    EmeraldsAndLime

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    Funny that... amidst all my oddities, so-called "negativity" and social reservations, no one has ever, in all my life, suggested I see someone. And I've only known one person who's ever seen a therapist before, and that was because his head was all messed up from all the LSD he took in his teenage years. I'm beginning to think that it's become all too casual in North America, that seeing a therapist/psychologist is a very normal thing, a social norm... and I'm rather wary of.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnetandblack2107 View Post
    How can I tell my parents I want to see I psychiatrist.
    Just like that, only leave out the "How can I tell my parents" part of it.



    There are some things that I really need to talk to someone about and I dont know who to talk to them about.
    Well, know this, if you're under 18, and you talk to a shrink, they record on that little pad, the majority of what you say, and afterwards when they talk to your parents "About the bill" this is just them sharing information.

    If you can't talk to your parents/guardians about something, don't talk to a shrink about it, because it's just a really expensive, indirect way, to get word passed back to them.



    I know my parents probably wont go for it since we probably cant afford it,
    If you have insurance (and I think every kid does, usually), you can see a therapist. Be mindful of what was previously mentioned however.

  5. #5

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    Um, just a member of the incredibly disturbed here. In my decade of experience with docs, your best bet is to see a psychologist (a PhD) first before you see a psychiatrist (MD and usually soul-less pill pusher). Something about med school usually kills off part of that human heart, I haven't met a psychiatrist I like yet. Most psychologists on the other hand I haven't met one I couldn't work with. Psychologist and therapists try to figure things out more than an average psychiatrist that wants to diagnose stuff and be done with it. It isn't always the case that they will share things with your parents, just depends on the rules you lay down. My psychologist only told my parents what I would let him when I was still underage. My old psychiatrist didn't give me much choice. Again it depends on the people and the situations, so like anything take what I say with a grain of salt.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by garnetandblack2107 View Post
    How can I tell my parents I want to see I psychiatrist. There are some things that I really need to talk to someone about and I dont know who to talk to them about. I know my parents probably wont go for it since we probably cant afford it, but I want to know if there are any ways to ask your parents about seeing one?


    Quote Originally Posted by BabyKitty View Post
    Um, just a member of the incredibly disturbed here. In my decade of experience with docs, your best bet is to see a psychologist (a PhD) first before you see a psychiatrist (MD and usually soul-less pill pusher). Something about med school usually kills off part of that human heart, I haven't met a psychiatrist I like yet. Most psychologists on the other hand I haven't met one I couldn't work with. Psychologist and therapists try to figure things out more than an average psychiatrist that wants to diagnose stuff and be done with it. It isn't always the case that they will share things with your parents, just depends on the rules you lay down. My psychologist only told my parents what I would let him when I was still underage. My old psychiatrist didn't give me much choice. Again it depends on the people and the situations, so like anything take what I say with a grain of salt.
    First things first, let's get our terms figured out: a psychiatrist holds the degree of a physician (M.D., D.O., etc.). Unfortunately, psychiatrists tend ... I'll say it this way. Psychiatrists who do not aim from the outset to get an M.D. specifically for psychiatry tend to be the bottom-third of their class. As mentioned above (and I concur with this), their GP training gets in the way of a more gestalt view and they tend toward medicinal interventions - as they are able to write prescriptions. Conversely, a psychologist holds a Ph.D. in psychology (or a Psy.D. - barf, it's "Ph.D.-lite") and has completed residency/hours/licensure training. Their training is based on coursework, a dissertation, and X hours of giving guided and stand-alone training. For instance, a friend of mine (who is one of the rare people in that field who actually like research) is building a new model to account for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and works with the VA (she's ex-Army). More traditionally, psychologists tend to dislike research (so they may need "prompting" about recent articles outlining interventions and techniques) but want to "help people." Also note that someone may try to hang up a shingle and claim that they are a psychologist, but actually hold an M.Sw. (Master's in Social Work).

    Sorry for the long lead-in, but I am currently housed in a department of psychology that is rather well-known and lauded for both its social and counseling programs. I've had coursework with counseling psychology students, and I have been ... unimpressed ... with most of them (as they shy away from research).

    I myself am a rather big proponent of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), as there is a well-established "ABC" link (Attitudes --> Behaviors --> Consequences (by way of habit) ). If you can interrupt this chain at any level, this change will back-propagate through the network and create change. Let me rephrase that: this is the reason why a good divorce judge or attorney will first tell the client to pretend that they love their partner madly for 30-60 days. As the behavior has changed, consequences will change and this will eventually trickle back to changing attitudes about the target (spouse).

    I would advise telling your parents, "Mom, dad, I'd like to work through some issues and think I could benefit from seeing a psychologist. Could we start looking at some biographical sketches of psychologists in the area?" I'd advise the bio-sketch as it will tell you their orientation to therapy and research/training background. Then you can make an appointment and see if you develop rapport.



    Quote Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
    Funny that... amidst all my oddities, so-called "negativity" and social reservations, no one has ever, in all my life, suggested I see someone. And I've only known one person who's ever seen a therapist before, and that was because his head was all messed up from all the LSD he took in his teenage years. I'm beginning to think that it's become all too casual in North America, that seeing a therapist/psychologist is a very normal thing, a social norm... and I'm rather wary of.
    I would disagree that it has "become all too casual" in the States. There is still a stigma against mental health (even preventative mental health) and its issues. I know a few people in counseling, but I'm biased as (a) grad school is the stress equivalent of being divorced, blended, and having a parent die at once, and (b) I know counseling psychology students, who must themselves undergo counseling.

    All that a psychologist does, and the best thing they do, is provide an outside party uninvolved and uninterested in you directly to act as a sounding board. Depending on their research orientation, they can also act as an external source for goal-setting behaviors (ala CBT) and get you kick-started towards better attitudes, behaviors, and consequences.

  7. #7

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    Good responses so far. I would also mention that there are other professionals that could be an option. The terms and qualifications vary from state-to-state, but there are mental health professionals like Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Master Social Workers, as well as those that specialize in certain issues like Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors. Another suggestion would be your school counselor. While he or she might not be able to help you directly, a referral to the right source may be possible.

    Also be aware that, again depending on the laws of your state, since you are 16, your records may be confidential, even from your parents. This could include the fact that you have even seen someone. You could ask your school counselor about that, if it is a concern.

  8. #8
    kitty0230

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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyKitty View Post
    Um, just a member of the incredibly disturbed here. In my decade of experience with docs, your best bet is to see a psychologist (a PhD) first before you see a psychiatrist (MD and usually soul-less pill pusher). Something about med school usually kills off part of that human heart, I haven't met a psychiatrist I like yet. Most psychologists on the other hand I haven't met one I couldn't work with. Psychologist and therapists try to figure things out more than an average psychiatrist that wants to diagnose stuff and be done with it. It isn't always the case that they will share things with your parents, just depends on the rules you lay down. My psychologist only told my parents what I would let him when I was still underage. My old psychiatrist didn't give me much choice. Again it depends on the people and the situations, so like anything take what I say with a grain of salt.
    He hit the nail on the head. A shrink just gives you pills and makes a diagnoses, a psychologist will talk to you about your problems, and the only shrink i like isn't even an MD, she is an APN who has both psychiatry and psychology training, who i mesh well with............

  9. #9
    Mesmerale

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harano View Post
    . . .
    Well, know this, if you're under 18, and you talk to a shrink, they record on that little pad, the majority of what you say, and afterwards when they talk to your parents "About the bill" this is just them sharing information.

    If you can't talk to your parents/guardians about something, don't talk to a shrink about it, because it's just a really expensive, indirect way, to get word passed back to them.

    . . .
    My therapist hasn't written anything down in over a month.

    If I don't want my parents, or anyone for that matter, to know about what I say that day, I walk into the room and start the conversation with, "Can this be kept private?"

    His answer is, and always will be, "Of course."

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesmerale View Post
    My therapist hasn't written anything down in over a month.

    If I don't want my parents, or anyone for that matter, to know about what I say that day, I walk into the room and start the conversation with, "Can this be kept private?"

    His answer is, and always will be, "Of course."
    Hmmm.

    It may be time to ask for his insight and planned therapeutic intervention for the next 3-5 sessions.

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