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Thread: Article: Suicide Prevention Help Lines

  1. #1

    Default Article: Suicide Prevention Help Lines

    Hi, everyone,
    I just wanted to take a moment to let people know that we got an article posted which gives a quick referral list of suicide helplines in regions around the world.

    http://www.adisc.org/forum/showthrea...82#post1290082

    The article serves two purposes. First, it can provide immediate assistance to anyone who is experiencing suicidal ideation and help connect them to a caring person IRL as soon as possible. Hopefully, it may also assist someone in getting help before they get to that stage of contemplating suicide. Secondly, it can be easily accessed by anyone here who is trying to encourage someone who is feeling suicidal to reach out and get help.

    As I have stated in previous threads, people at Adisc give phenomenal, genuine and caring support when one of our members is down. An article could never replace that. This article is only meant to act as a quick referral guide to ensure the resources are readily available and that we can focus on the person instead of spending time trying to find referrals for them. I hope people will find it useful.
    Last edited by Starrunner; 21-May-2015 at 16:30.

  2. #2

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    That's good to see! Good job Starrunner getting one made!

  3. #3

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    I saw that article - it's an awesome compilation of resources! It's one I'm keeping close by for when people are contemplating suicide. This is a really important way to provide support to people.

  4. #4

  5. #5

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    Hello All,

    The down side to them is police can end up at your door just by talking with them. If the person on the hotline thinks your suicidal, they will send police to do a welfare check. In years past, I made a mistake calling such hotlines. Sadly you get two replies. One, if your not suicidal and just need to talk, they will say they can only talk to suicidal callers and need to let you go. Then if you say your suicidal and they think you may do it (just think you MIGHT) they will sit and chat with you while on the other line call the police out to your home. Suddenly your talking to someone and suddenly your doorbell rings and it's the cops. If the cops for any reason feel your suicidal your put in handcuffs (as they call it "protective Custody"), put in the back of the police car and taken either to a psychiatric hospital or local ER for a evaluation by a mental health worker to see if you need to be hospitalized.

    In my county, we don't have a psych ward. I was taken to the ER, had all my clothing and things taken from me and sat in a gown for almost 24 hours before a mental health worker showed up. One time I was simply sent home finally. Second time I was told I was going to be admitted and sat in the ER for another 2 days waiting for a bed to open somewhere before I could finally be taken to the hospital 4 hours drive away in Sacramento before my 72 hour evaluation even STARTED.

    My advice, if you just need someone to talk to, I highly recommend going to www.psychcentral.com to talk. That's where I go now. They have forums for every mental problem out there including depression. But of course is not set up for people who are actively suicidal and thinking of doing it. IF your at that point and are thinking of taking your life, THEN call a suicide hotline. But even then, your better off just simply driving yourself to the ER or local mental health center.

    Police are often not trained for mental health calls. I have had cops tell me straight up "you know, we have more important things to do than to be coming out for people like you". Have had one tell me "why call a hotline, just kill yourself and get it over with, we have better things to be doing". And one time was almost charged with assault when a officer who came out slipped off the side of the sidewalk and almost fell. Thankfully his partner caught him. He stood back up and yells at me "you know, you can be charged for that!" When I asked what he meant, he said that I pushed him. How the hell could I push him when I was in front of him, and in handcuffs. And he fell sideways. How could I push him sideways from standing in front of him, and in handcuffs. My advice, if your suicidal and think you might do something, either drive yourself or get a ride from a friend and go to the local ER. At least that way you don't have to deal with heartless cops while your already feeling bad enough, you don't have to be put in handcuffs or explain to neighbors why your being put in a cop car, or risk being charged with something you didn't do or get mean comments from cops who feel calls like yours is a waste of their time. I mean heck it was in the news just last month, cops were called for a bipolar man. His parents called. The cops had him in cuffs. Another cop came in and said he didn't time for this, pulled his gun and shot the man dead. Cops sadly have no business dealing with people who are mentally in a bad place and often make the situation worse.

    So to end, if you just need to talk to someone, call a friend or go to www.psychcentral.com. And if your suicidal and going to do it, go to your local ER or mental health hospital (depending on your area). You will be safer and you will only be in the hospital when you need to, not because a hotline worker was new and decided to have the cops pick you up on a "better safe than sorry"/"Just in case" thing. Just my two cents on the subject.

    -Baby Stanley

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by stanley19802 View Post
    Hello All,

    The down side to them is police can end up at your door just by talking with them. If the person on the hotline thinks your suicidal, they will send police to do a welfare check. In years past, I made a mistake calling such hotlines. Sadly you get two replies. One, if your not suicidal and just need to talk, they will say they can only talk to suicidal callers and need to let you go. Then if you say your suicidal and they think you may do it (just think you MIGHT) they will sit and chat with you while on the other line call the police out to your home. Suddenly your talking to someone and suddenly your doorbell rings and it's the cops. If the cops for any reason feel your suicidal your put in handcuffs (as they call it "protective Custody"), put in the back of the police car and taken either to a psychiatric hospital or local ER for a evaluation by a mental health worker to see if you need to be hospitalized.

    In my county, we don't have a psych ward. I was taken to the ER, had all my clothing and things taken from me and sat in a gown for almost 24 hours before a mental health worker showed up. One time I was simply sent home finally. Second time I was told I was going to be admitted and sat in the ER for another 2 days waiting for a bed to open somewhere before I could finally be taken to the hospital 4 hours drive away in Sacramento before my 72 hour evaluation even STARTED.

    My advice, if you just need someone to talk to, I highly recommend going to www.psychcentral.com to talk. That's where I go now. They have forums for every mental problem out there including depression. But of course is not set up for people who are actively suicidal and thinking of doing it. IF your at that point and are thinking of taking your life, THEN call a suicide hotline. But even then, your better off just simply driving yourself to the ER or local mental health center.

    Police are often not trained for mental health calls. I have had cops tell me straight up "you know, we have more important things to do than to be coming out for people like you". Have had one tell me "why call a hotline, just kill yourself and get it over with, we have better things to be doing". And one time was almost charged with assault when a officer who came out slipped off the side of the sidewalk and almost fell. Thankfully his partner caught him. He stood back up and yells at me "you know, you can be charged for that!" When I asked what he meant, he said that I pushed him. How the hell could I push him when I was in front of him, and in handcuffs. And he fell sideways. How could I push him sideways from standing in front of him, and in handcuffs. My advice, if your suicidal and think you might do something, either drive yourself or get a ride from a friend and go to the local ER. At least that way you don't have to deal with heartless cops while your already feeling bad enough, you don't have to be put in handcuffs or explain to neighbors why your being put in a cop car, or risk being charged with something you didn't do or get mean comments from cops who feel calls like yours is a waste of their time. I mean heck it was in the news just last month, cops were called for a bipolar man. His parents called. The cops had him in cuffs. Another cop came in and said he didn't time for this, pulled his gun and shot the man dead. Cops sadly have no business dealing with people who are mentally in a bad place and often make the situation worse.

    So to end, if you just need to talk to someone, call a friend or go to www.psychcentral.com. And if your suicidal and going to do it, go to your local ER or mental health hospital (depending on your area). You will be safer and you will only be in the hospital when you need to, not because a hotline worker was new and decided to have the cops pick you up on a "better safe than sorry"/"Just in case" thing. Just my two cents on the subject.

    -Baby Stanley
    Well.... I can't speak to your experience or how helplines work in your area. I can only refer to my own experience having worked for my local distress centre for three years. In all the time I volunteered there, there was not a single incident where we were required to call the police for a potential suicide.

    When people call a helpline, they are scared and many have the intent of ending their lives. However, just the fact that they are calling a helpline is a positive sign and the volunteer works from a perspective of helping the caller in identifying better alternatives. Volunteers do need to be trained in how and when to contact the police, but this is done under the strictest conditions: (1) the person is in the process of committing suicide and will not stop the act, or (2) there is an imminent threat of committing the act.. Where I worked, an on-call supervisor had to be contacted first to verify the threat was imminent prior to the call being made to the police. In short, it is not done lightly or frequently, and only if there is a very real risk to the loss of the caller's life. If the choice is between listening to someone die or calling the police, I think most people can figure out what the right option would be.

    The second type of calls that come into helplines are from 'regular callers,' people who are lonely and have no one to talk to. They may call several times a week.These calls can prevent people from falling into depression or further into depression because they can talk things over with someone at the end of the day. There is no 'requirement' to be suicidal to call the helpline and people who are depressed and need to talk out their problems are welcome. This is preventative service in that it keeps the caller from reaching the crisis stage of becoming suicidal.

    The third type of calls that come into helplines are referral calls. These can be calls from anyone in the community who is looking to get referrals for any kind of help for their mental or social wellbeing. This could include referrals to emergency housing services, community health centres, medical services,, social assistance, mental health services, and a wealth of other services. Our local distress centre has one of the most comprehensive and utilized resource bases in the city, and it is accessed by the general public and professionals looking for services for their clients. This is significant reason why I recommend calling a local helpline instead of going to an online website. Local helplines will have information about whatever resources and services are available in a community and can make an appropriate referral based on the individual needs of the caller. As we all know, services and support can vary from one area to the other.

    Every year, thousands and thousands of people get help from volunteers at these centres, volunteers who are trained to help the person through the crisis with caring compassion.. They are not in it just to contact the police at the first indication of suicide. They are there to connect with the person to help them make their own choices.
    Last edited by Starrunner; 27-May-2015 at 12:46.

  7. #7

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    Thanks Starrunner for highlighting this and sharing your experience. It's really helpful.

  8. #8

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    You know what I think, and thank you so much. Who knows when it may save someone's life, someone who's a member on this site, someone we've talked to and care about.

  9. #9

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    In Australia they are very good as well. I never had the police turn up and they were great for getting me through tough patches, usually when I couldn't sleep. Sometimes, especially around 2am, they're very busy though.

    And never feel bad for calling the cops, especially in Australia. My mate is a cop and says over 60% of call are mental health and they're trained in it.

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