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Thread: CNC Machinest classes

  1. #1

    Default CNC Machinest classes

    So today I started my cnc classes, today was just an introductory lesson and a basic math easement, and I have to admit it feels great to actually have to think again. Math has nevee been my strong point, but i feel I did ok. Even if I didn't, ot still felt great to sit down and apply myself to something that I'm not normally good at

  2. #2

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    Have you ever taken manual Machinist classes.

    i hate the schools that do not give the students wanting to be Machinist any training in the non CNC part.

    They do not have the students best interest in mind an are teaching students to be factory workers good for loading blocks \of metal and unloading finished products.

    i am a old manual Machinist and can do one offs that would rarely be done on CNC because of the setup and programing time.

    And i can do gunsmithing because i have the manual time and training.

  3. #3

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    Nice !! I work at a custom hot rod shop and I really want to know how work a CNC machine. Just thinking all the cool parts I can makes want to find a school. If you don't mind me asking where is your school located ?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by anned View Post
    Have you ever taken manual Machinist classes.

    i hate the schools that do not give the students wanting to be Machinist any training in the non CNC part.

    They do not have the students best interest in mind an are teaching students to be factory workers good for loading blocks \of metal and unloading finished products.

    i am a old manual Machinist and can do one offs that would rarely be done on CNC because of the setup and programing time.

    And i can do gunsmithing because i have the manual time and training.

    I'm a machinist / mechanical engineer these days specialized on CNC machinery working both at my own shop mostly some prototyping stuff and for the evaluation of possible work-process solutions and as a consultant for other companies when it comes to CNC machinery (larger stuff mostly), processes etc.

    Whilst I agree that it can help to have a background (as I do) in manual machining, it is truly not a requirement in my opinion. Handy? no doubt. But needed?...

    The thing that with modern CNC machining, HSM stuff, Carbide Tooling, etc the game has truly changed quite a bit and many idioms that are true with manual machining simply don't apply anymore in the CNC world.
    Feeds and speeds are quite different - respectively especially with HSM stuff just way out of the league of manual machining, so is the tooling, with ultra HP carbide stuff able to to climb milling on 65HRC hard steels...
    Then comes simultaneous 3-5+ Axis milling and combination lathes that can do mill-work as well.
    So whilst it helps to learn a few of the basics that apply to both the manual/conventional machining, CNC is a different world.

    And now to this thing about set up and programming time - I'm actually sick of hearing it.
    With modern Controllers such as Siemens SINUMERIC for example you can actually programm on the go, VERY RAPIDLY even somewhat more complex geometries.
    So in the time it takes you on a conventional mill to center the rotary table, make a few caluclation set up the tools, and mount the work to get a circular pattern of holes into a piece of steel, my cnc machine has produced three of the parts, easily. or just one, in about a third of the time.

    When you add capable CAD/CAM software and aZ- good postprocessor to the game - well it truly looks different... stuff like getting a 6,68mm wide and 23,65mm long slot into anything with automatic Z-Level step downs and Z-Axis ramping...
    I can do all this with an automated touch probe to allocate the work piece' center, zero it in... no need for reading out a DRO, checking everything ... I draw it... use whatever matching tool sits ready in the automatic tool changer and click on "START".
    I could fetch a coffee in the meant time... or write that invoice....

    CNC can be EVERY BIT as fast - even for basic geometries - as conventional manual machining... IF the operator KNOWS what he can do with the machine, controller and software.
    It can be easily FASTER if you really know your game.

    And gunsmithing just gets far more exciting on CNC level...

    I'm not saying there's no room for conventional manual machining - if the operator is skilled, speed can be good...
    But that stupid claim that CNC is no good for one off parts - it WAS true back about 10 years or so... but it has been proven time after time, that with a modern machine and the appropriate know how this simply no longer is the case.




    and to the OP: HAVE FUN.

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