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Thread: RE: Testifying @ the NH House Judiciary Committee on NH HB # 1325

  1. #1

    Default RE: Testifying @ the NH House Judiciary Committee on NH HB # 1325

    I was busy yesterday:

    TCW AUTISM INSIDE 6 H - My Testimony RE: NH HB # 1325 - 02042014 - YouTube

    As a member of the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN), I was @ the New Hampshire State House Office Building giving testimony in opposition to NH House Bill # 1325 (To "Legalize" Physician-Assisted Suicide).

    I apologize for opening up a can of worms on a sensitive subject.

    Woody
    "caitianx"

  2. #2

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    I agree that it's not a good idea. Most of the time, when people are suicidal, they are in a moment of severe crisis and they are not thinking rationally at all. I've had it happen to me. I'm glad I didn't actually 'succeed' when I had attempted. I came to realize that they were moments of severe crisis, and not things that came about rationally at all. I think, honestly, 98% of people who are suicidal aren't thinking rationally in that moment and are simply not capable of rational thought in that moment. And by 'moment' I mean it could be up to a year or even longer... but almost always, there is a way out, and the way isn't suicide.

    It reminds me of this thing I heard, about people who jumped from the bridge and survived. Every one of them (who survived) had a sudden moment of clarity as they fell from the bridge to the water. They regretted jumping. One man was quoted as having said this chilling statement about what it felt like right after he jumped: "
    ‘I thought, What am I doing? This was the worst thing I could do in my life. I thought of my wife and daughter. I didn't want to die. I wanted to live.' He recalls realizing that ‘everything in my life that I'd thought was unfixable was totally fixable - except for having just jumped."[source]


  3. #3

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    Not all suicide is because of depression though, they're times when people don't want to go through the last few months of a terminal illness.

    Also, I think people should have the right to have an assisted suicide.
    Life isn't enjoyable to some. Why continue something that you don't enjoy? Things that were once enjoyable, just isn't fun anymore.

    They're many things that I lost interest in. I'm literally bored with life. Nothing interests me. I go to work, I come home and become oblivious and do nothing.

    I can't keep a job because I get so bored that it frustrates me.

    What exactly can I do that would change my experience?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    Not all suicide is because of depression though, they're times when people don't want to go through the last few months of a terminal illness.
    When I said 98%, above, I was thinking that maybe 2% is a rational choice based on a definite terminal illness. That is a fully made up stat - I don't have the real stats on how many suicides are due to terminal illness, but off the top of my head, I'd have to say it's a very small percentage of suicides. Okay, I'm looking it up right now.... Wow! My wild guess was weirdly accurate. Apparently, only 2% to 4% of suicides are attempted by terminally ill patients. [source]

    A problem with even those data about terminally ill patients is that out of all of them who are feeling suicidal (without having to have attempted it), they all have severe depression. [source]. But the most fascinating data on this page is actually this: "Of those who attempt suicide but are stopped, less than 4 percent go on to kill themselves in the next five years; less than 11 percent will commit suicide over the next 35 years."

    So many people regretted the choice. We have interviews from the people who survived a jump off the Golden Gate Bridge, and we have statistics like this, and it all points to the idea that there are better ways than suicide. We can manage the pain and suffering of the terminally ill, and we should. If they are suffering so greatly that they desire death, they aren't getting enough medication and treatment! If a person is suffering from clinical depression - basically the leading cause of suicide... they also need help. Which brings me to....



    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    Also, I think people should have the right to have an assisted suicide.
    Life isn't enjoyable to some. Why continue something that you don't enjoy? Things that were once enjoyable, just isn't fun anymore.


    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post

    They're many things that I lost interest in. I'm literally bored with life. Nothing interests me. I go to work, I come home and become oblivious and do nothing.

    I can't keep a job because I get so bored that it frustrates me.

    What exactly can I do that would change my experience?


    Those are the reasons why I would think no, no, no. These can not be reasons for assisted suicide. You don't want death. You just want a more enjoyable / less painful life. Many things can give you that. In some cases perhaps you have a chemical imbalance in your brain, that makes you feel like nothing is enjoyable. Medication may help you balance that out and you can experience pleasure again! There are many meds to choose from, too. Honestly, being totally bored with life, not finding things enjoyable anymore - those are classic symptoms of depression.

    You need help, not death. What you can do to change your experience is get help. Go to your doctor. Go to a therapist. Tell someone you love and trust. Read a book, or find (or re-find) God if you're inclined to those things, or learn to play a new instrument, or join a club, or get a pet to love and care for, if you can afford it. Mice/hamsters are cheap to buy and care for! There's like a million other things to try and I can't list it all in one forum post.

    Look, we don't know for sure what happens after death (no matter what any religion or atheist tells you, we just honestly can't know), but we do know that people can and do recover from depression all the time. So let's focus on what we know, right now, in real life. We know you have a big problem, and we know it's fixable, and it's been fixed before for people just like you. And I know you're pretty awesome. You write nice and encouraging posts around here, you're kind to people, and you're a good person. I want people like you to stick around. I'm sad you're suffering right now. But there's always hope, always. Message me if you want to, and we can come up with lots of ideas for you. But I really, truly, think you need to see a doctor or a therapist. You don't need death, you need help with your life.
    Last edited by Frogsy; 06-Feb-2014 at 08:00. Reason: My quotes didn't quote...

  5. #5

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    This is a pretty serious issue, I dont exactly want to weigh into the debate to much as i haven't massively studied into it but i am pro-euthanasia.

    But I did want to share a documentary on this issue for sometime i respect to an immense degree and its probably the best piece of media I have see on this issue





    In this documentary Terry Pratchett discusses his Alzheimer's and how it is slowly eroding away his life and his talent. He meets others with medical conditions which will inevitably lead to a prolonged, painful and above all undignified death and asks the question "is it better to end things early?" There are few answers here. Pratchett is on a genuine mission of inquiry, he's not preaching a position, nor does he end up with an opinion. Instead he takes a frank look at a subject most shy away from, and his only real conclusion is that we'd perhaps do well to think it through more than we do now.

    Be warned, towards the end of the documentary he accompanies a man to a Swiss clinic where he chooses to end his own life. This is not depicted in any kind of voyeuristic way, but both Pratchett and the camera do sit right there in the room with him and watches him die in cold, unflinching detail.




    Quote Originally Posted by Frogsy View Post
    or find (or re-find) God
    Which god :p?
    Also re-find how do you lose a god in the first place ^^? seems an odd thing to misplace.
    Last edited by JuliusSeizure; 06-Feb-2014 at 12:31.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatAndyGuy View Post
    Which god :p?
    Also re-find how do you lose a god in the first place ^^? seems an odd thing to misplace.
    Any God/Gods that make sense to that person, or a nontheistic religion, such as Buddhism for example. Also a new philosophy may help greatly, unconnected to religion. Religion and/or philosophy seem to greatly help depressed people. It's one option out of many. But it depends on the person, depends on their problem/s, and depends on what they need. If they need medication, religion and/or a new philosophy probably won't help very much.

    I'm not here to promote any particular faith or philosophy. Some ideas in Buddhism and the philosophy of Alan Watts help me, personally, but may not be the answer at all for another different person. I've seen faith help people do tremendous things, on a personal level, though. So I won't discount it. Also, studies have shown that religious people are happier than nonreligious people. So I think it can sometimes be worth a shot if someone is lost and feeling alone, especially.

    Oh, sorry, I forgot to add. Lots of people lose their religion and later go back to it. I lost my original religion, that I was born into (Catholicism) and never went back. I have no intention of it. But other people I've known in life stepped away from their faith and then later found that they were happier with it, and returned. If it makes people happy, and fulfills them, more power to them.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by caitianx View Post
    As a member of the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN), I was @ the New Hampshire State House Office Building giving testimony in opposition to NH House Bill # 1325 (To "Legalize" Physician-Assisted Suicide).
    Why would someone, as an autism advocate, be protesting a bill that would give legal clearance for physicians to give terminally ill patients a means to end their suffering? I'm not saying you should or shouldn't disagree with the standpoint. I just don't see what autism has to do with the matter.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Frogsy View Post
    When I said 98%, above, I was thinking that maybe 2% is a rational choice based on a definite terminal illness. That is a fully made up stat - I don't have the real stats on how many suicides are due to terminal illness, but off the top of my head, I'd have to say it's a very small percentage of suicides. Okay, I'm looking it up right now.... Wow! My wild guess was weirdly accurate. Apparently, only 2% to 4% of suicides are attempted by terminally ill patients. [source]
    I think there's some distinction to be made here. By "suicides," are we talking about a person in a hospital hooked up to half a dozen machines who's been certified of sound mine and prescribed a lethal dose of painkillers? Or are we talking about someone with who just got a diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme and turned on the car in the garage? Or both? The two are very different cases.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by ThatAndyGuy View Post
    Be warned, towards the end of the documentary he accompanies a man to a Swiss clinic where he chooses to end his own life.
    I'm kind of assuming that's the preview screen the video window is showing. You might want to change that to a link rather than embedded video.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AEsahaettr View Post
    I think there's some distinction to be made here. By "suicides," are we talking about a person in a hospital hooked up to half a dozen machines who's been certified of sound mine and prescribed a lethal dose of painkillers? Or are we talking about someone with who just got a diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme and turned on the car in the garage? Or both? The two are very different cases.
    I think that data was from all 'attempted' suicides. 2-4 percent terminally ill attempted. So we'd be talking more about the latter scenario. The first scenario sounds like assisted, and would be successful, not attempted. But later data I found said all their research said those patients were clinically depressed, so, having learned new information and having thought more on the issue, I'm just not sure. I can see it being used for terminally ill patients in at the final stages of life. But even then, I'd be so wary, I don't think I'd personally vote on a bill like it. I, right now, can not see it for any other purpose, especially for people suffering mental illness like depression. There are other ways to find hope and help!

  9. #9

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    For myself, I have attempted suicide in my youth, and I have lost a partner to suicide. I also lost a friend to suicide when she was going through a personal crisis.

    As I've said on a similar thread, the statistics on suicide won't change drastically if we narrow our focus on legislation and regulation. That is not an answer. We need to open dialogue in the communities where suicides occur at higher rates than the general population and identify the causes. Here in Canada for example, the aboriginal populations on reserves have a disproportionate rate of suicide, along with other variables such as high levels of unemployment, low graduation rates in schools because of less funding for education, and facing discrimination off the reserves. We need to get into the institutions where there are vulnerable populations, particularly youth in schools, who have limited life experiences and sometimes see suicide as the only way out. GLBT youth specifically are up to four times more likely to suffer from symptoms of depression and are more prone to suited than the rest of the general population.

    Just talking publicly and openly about suicide would be a big step forward. When my partner committed suicide, nobody talked about the cause of his death. It made people uncomfortable. There is still a myth that if we talk about it, it might give others the idea of doing it, when in fact the opposite is true. Unless we drag this issue out of the closet, people will continue to feel isolated and alone with their self destructive thoughts. Education to prevent suicide would be more beneficial than coming up with legislation about ending the practice.

    What we really need is a comprehensive suicide prevention strategy, one that includes mental health services, education, and preventative measures, and also identifying the groups who are most at risk and developing a supportive structure, such as employment and education programs to disadvantaged populations. Give people hope, and you will reduce the risk of losing lives.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AEsahaettr View Post
    I'm kind of assuming that's the preview screen the video window is showing. You might want to change that to a link rather than embedded video.
    No it just appears to be a random image from the middle of the documentary, its a still image though and just shows a person drinking.

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