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Thread: Steam OS went live Finally

  1. #1

    Default Steam OS went live Finally

    so first step in the developing "steam machine" went live today the Steam OS is avalible for download now. here's the Artical on it.

    Download SteamOS now ? Valve's free Linux-based operating system releases | PC Gamer

  2. #2

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    One of the biggest issues facing a Steam OS will be multimedia. Consoles aren't just 'game machines' anymore, they are the doorway to everything from YouTube, to Netflix, to Hulu to HBO Go and a lot more. Steam is going to need various content providers to back up Steam OS, or else they'll leave consumers forced to use a DIFFERNET box just to watch Streaming content. Browser based media can be an issue as certain support is desired, like encryption, for services like Netflix and this is reasonable. Hopefully some companies will get onboard and offer their own multimedia apps for Steam to give it a nice boost.

    On that note, I'm not sure if this hardware will work or not. Steam is certainly an attractive platform, especially as if you wait long enough, just about every game eventually goes on sale for $4.99 or less. That's really attractive. However, unless the hardware and game support comes up, it'll face huge problems, and it'll be hard enough to tell people 'Well, it's a PC, but it's also a console, like your Xbox... No, really.' I already have a Windows based Steam Machine, that runs XBMC along side Steam BPM, I love it, and since it's Windows it doesn't face any major issues with game support. Though I'll test In Home streaming on it once that beta opens up.



    One thing I'm more confident is, the Steam Controller. Looks nice for getting RTS, 4X and other traditionally 'Non Gamepad Games' on the TV without resorting to you using a mouse on the couch. I'd want to test one out, hands on first, but I'd be pretty tempted to buy one.

  3. #3

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    Looking at it, I'm just totally failing to see the value proposition for game developers. Steam OS looks like just another bizarre "thing" that's neither here nor there. Steam solved a real, tangible problem by simplifying and cost-reducing game distribution. Steam OS doesn't appear to simplify anything. In fact, it looks like it complicates things. Buy/build a new PC to run Steam OS and stream from another PC in my house? It's like Nintendo building an Xbox add-on or something. And if it doesn't exemplify "plug-and-play" it's dead meat. Having one PC connect to the internet is hard enough for the average consumer. Require them to daisy-chain devices and you'd better have a call center ready!

    I dunno. This Steam OS / SteamBox business gets a colossal YAAAWWWWWN from me.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cottontail View Post
    Looking at it, I'm just totally failing to see the value proposition for game developers. Steam OS looks like just another bizarre "thing" that's neither here nor there. Steam solved a real, tangible problem by simplifying and cost-reducing game distribution. Steam OS doesn't appear to simplify anything. In fact, it looks like it complicates things. Buy/build a new PC to run Steam OS and stream from another PC in my house? It's like Nintendo building an Xbox add-on or something. And if it doesn't exemplify "plug-and-play" it's dead meat. Having one PC connect to the internet is hard enough for the average consumer. Require them to daisy-chain devices and you'd better have a call center ready!
    Well yeah ;-), in case of Steam OS solely, you can't deny that it's that way, or that it perhaps still will be that way in the future.

    But the os is merely something to make it possible for the steambox to run games. In the end it's a plug and play console. You don't need to care about this or that. Perhaps the best comparison would be with the old ps3(despite that it's on par with the actual new gen, or better) times, when a lot of people installed linux on it. Either way to have a working distribution or also to emulate some other games.
    Still, we need to wait if Valve is really able to release their steamboxes in a price range that's... competitive, as they planned and stated so far. Otherwise it would be a disaster.

    On the other hand it's also... a big amount of just believing.
    Gabe Newell does so, he said that Linux is the future for gaming, Nvidia followed and is releasing working graphics driver for it (AMD surely too already or in time). Releasing Steam itself for linux has been a great accomplishment already. There are a lot of indie games on linux, just some well made games though, but more come, it is improving a lot. A fun fact is also with the humble indie bundle that windows user's usually pay ~4$, mac 6$ and linux user's up to 9$ sometimes. Although perhaps that simply shows how desperate linux users are for games ;).

    All this is awesome and it shows the world and game developers that linux is a viable platform. Which is also about time, since it lacks simply too much important applications for too much industries. For games, as for on a professional basis you need eitherway a windows PC or a Mac. Alternatives are okay of course, but some just don't exist. Some people are surely like "oh then I code it", but that is not really a working option. On the other hand a lot of people are just like "oh, linux doesn't support photoshop", they don't care about well made alternatives. Another funny fact in this case is that GIMP is trying to copy the look of photoshop since the last 3 years, to convince some people to switch - it has already the functions but it looks different.
    That's the point, perhaps convincing certain industries that they should release their applications for linux too is the better choice, as it is about to come with games and steam. Fact is that a lot of people just sit on Windows because it runs every game.

    And yeah... the steam os still is a linux distribution underneath. One of the big questions is only how it will play out in the end, and what valve is doing about making this accessible to other distributions aswell in a manner that everyone of them is able to run everything the same. On condition that it works out with the steam OS itself. But the Ouya did fine already, despite the fact that it's just android with open source and mobile games... so we will have to wait.

    So until it is finished... it's a lot of yawning for everyone I guess. ^_-

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyAshes View Post
    One of the biggest issues facing a Steam OS will be multimedia. Consoles aren't just 'game machines' anymore, they are the doorway to everything from YouTube, to Netflix, to Hulu to HBO Go and a lot more. Steam is going to need various content providers to back up Steam OS, or else they'll leave consumers forced to use a DIFFERNET box just to watch Streaming content. Browser based media can be an issue as certain support is desired, like encryption, for services like Netflix and this is reasonable. Hopefully some companies will get onboard and offer their own multimedia apps for Steam to give it a nice boost.
    not really an issue if you know where to go i have ubuntu 12.04 on my laptop and have the streaming apps for netflix and hulu installed they do work with linux you just have to make a few tweaks to the code and package it right there are many user made archives that you can add to ubuntu and other distributions that have these programs but like i said you jsut have to know where to go.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    not really an issue if you know where to go i have ubuntu 12.04 on my laptop and have the streaming apps for netflix and hulu installed they do work with linux you just have to make a few tweaks to the code and package it right there are many user made archives that you can add to ubuntu and other distributions that have these programs but like i said you jsut have to know where to go.
    And this is EXACTLY why it's an issue. 'Tweaks' and getting 'packages'. That's not the point of SteamOS. It's to make the thing IDIOT PROOF. It's to just make it a 'box' that you buy, bring home, plug in, turn on, and VOILA it 'just works'. It should be so simple that your dog or cat should be able to make use of it. It needs to be an official, working, well designed App and available right through Steam. While SteamOS is accessible and can be hacked to bits, that's not the goal of Valve, it's goal is to make something simple that brings their platform to the living room while making it as easy as possible on the consumer. The people doing the 'tinkery' stuff are a small demographic and they'd already put this stuff together on their own using the existing Steam client for Linux, or like I have using Windows and pairing it for XBMC. But SteamOS is really about building an appliance for consumers.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by daLira View Post
    On the other hand it's also... a big amount of just believing.
    Gabe Newell does so, he said that Linux is the future for gaming, Nvidia followed and is releasing working graphics driver for it (AMD surely too already or in time). Releasing Steam itself for linux has been a great accomplishment already. There are a lot of indie games on linux, just some well made games though, but more come, it is improving a lot. A fun fact is also with the humble indie bundle that windows user's usually pay ~4$, mac 6$ and linux user's up to 9$ sometimes. Although perhaps that simply shows how desperate linux users are for games .
    Hehe, yeah, I think it's the latter -- desperation! It's certainly possible that Linux could become a dominant game OS, but I don't see it happening anytime soon. Linux has no real technical advantage over any of its competitors. Its only real advantage over other operating systems is cost, much like Android for smartphones. In the console business, though, the cost of the OS is not really a factor for the competitors either. Microsoft isn't paying licensing fees for the Xbox OS, after all; it already owns the OS! Cracking into the console business is going to require a really strong value prop for big game studios, as they're already stretched across several strong platforms.

    As far as Steam OS stealing gamers from Windows, it's hard for me to see how that actually works. Unless it grows to perform the functions and run the applications that other operating systems do, users with PCs are going to be running those other operating systems anyway. And if they do that, why bother with Steam OS? Who's going to care enough to mess with it? At that point, you might have the attention of the sorts of gamers who build their own PCs and who used to haul them to LAN parties, but that's a drop in the bucket.

    I'm still scratching my head on this. Valve is an interesting company, though.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AshleyAshes View Post
    And this is EXACTLY why it's an issue. 'Tweaks' and getting 'packages'. That's not the point of SteamOS. It's to make the thing IDIOT PROOF. It's to just make it a 'box' that you buy, bring home, plug in, turn on, and VOILA it 'just works'. It should be so simple that your dog or cat should be able to make use of it. It needs to be an official, working, well designed App and available right through Steam. While SteamOS is accessible and can be hacked to bits, that's not the goal of Valve, it's goal is to make something simple that brings their platform to the living room while making it as easy as possible on the consumer. The people doing the 'tinkery' stuff are a small demographic and they'd already put this stuff together on their own using the existing Steam client for Linux, or like I have using Windows and pairing it for XBMC. But SteamOS is really about building an appliance for consumers.
    i basicly stated that it already exists someone has already done the work to do it. by the time that "Steam Machine" releases netflix and possibly hulu may be on board even if it fails there is still a chance for a market and while developing it for steam OS they will also be OFFICIALY extending to linux in general further expanding their consumer base.

    as for "getting packages" its no diffrent than Xbox or PS. the consoles don't come preloaded with the software youy still have to find and download it off the store

  9. #9

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    I may actually try this I have been a cs junkie since beta and my gaming system is minimal as far as the os goes and I only log into steam when I turn it on.

  10. #10

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    Part of me thinks it may be premature to call out Steam Machines / Steam OS just yet. I think Valve is just having a card up their sleeve at the current time (maybe not an ace, but at least a jack).

    Consider the following. Gaming (Windows) PCs without doubt represent the largest share of the Steam user market. But the general public is moving to a post PC devices. Macs aren't the most cost effective gaming machines and (traditional) Linux gaming is still rather distant.

    Valve's opinion of Windows 8 was rather vocal but on the other hand the PC market is shrinking. So with the future of their primary platform looking hostile to competitive digital stores and the platform's market share itself shrinking Valve has opted to create new territory for its future.

    Frankly the list of unique abilities between my mobile devices and laptop shrinks yearly. For the average consumer I'd argue it's already gone. Why buy a PC to do what a Chromebook can readily do and do it for less money (and considering practically all of what he she does is already done in Chrome). And a Chromebook is only better for mass data entry but provides little else over my smartphone with regards to media consumption.

    So what is left that a PC can do really well? Professional applications (editing, programming, etc) and gaming. Seeing as the former is a niche market Value has opted to focus on the later. So in 3 years if your smartphone can do everything but (locally) play Crysis why not pick up a Steam Machine and skip the Windows tax for functionality that you don't really want since you already do it on your smartphone / tablet?

    Now market adoption and the upcoming disruption of cloud gaming...that's a different story.

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