Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Thatcherism, rave culture and the 1989 Summer of Love

  1. #1

    Lightbulb Thatcherism, rave culture and the 1989 Summer of Love

    There have been a couple of threads mentioning Margaret Thatcher and rave culture recently (just not at the same time!), and I just saw this great documentary.

    Thatcher is mentioned intermittently throughout, but there's a pretty good summary of her effects in the UK shortly after the 2 minute mark.

    Even though I was 13 at the time (in 1989), it takes me back to the days when I started to learn about the rave subculture that forever changed the world as we know it.

    Well... I just thought some of you might enjoy it:


  2. #2

    Default

    Twas my understanding that raves evolved out of the hippie movement with particular focus on the "kool-aid acid tests" where they would administer the psychedelic compound and utilize films, slides and other visual effects on a screen while the music was playing. My Flash is sort of flickering anyway so I'll have to try the video at some other time

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by MOPaddED View Post
    Twas my understanding that raves evolved out of the hippie movement with particular focus on the "kool-aid acid tests" where they would administer the psychedelic compound and utilize films, slides and other visual effects on a screen while the music was playing. My Flash is sort of flickering anyway so I'll have to try the video at some other time
    The hippy movement in the '60s (and the first Summer of Love) was more about LSD. The Second Summer of Love in '89 was around MDMA, which resulted in a completely different subculture. But it's an interesting video -- I hope you enjoy it. :-)

    EDIT:
    But yeah... the more recent rave culture couldn't have existed without the counter-culture movement of the '60s, so I guess you're right -- the hippy movement probably did (eventually) give rise to rave culture... in a way...

  4. #4

    Default

    OH baby, and dogboy was one of those hippies...(takes bow).

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    OH baby, and dogboy was one of those hippies...(takes bow).
    Woo! I think one of the main differences between the cultural revolution of the '60s and the cultural revolution (if it can be called that) of the late '80s and early '90s is the number of people involved.

    In the '60s, (from what I've heard), the cultural revolutionaries (of which I'm sure you were one, dogboy!) were relatively few in number, yet had a profound effect on the political landscape.

    In the '80s/'90s, the "counterculture" was much more mainstream. It was still an "underground" kind of thing at first, but eventually it completely took over (and quickly became commercialised). The effect it had on culture was more subtle but more pervasive and far-reaching; less political, less radical and more of a social change.

    MDMA had a big effect on promoting equality between people of difference backgrounds (races, classes, sexual orientations), and even football violence dropped as its fans started dropping pills...

    Did you see the documentary? I thought it was pretty interesting... :-)

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    OH baby, and dogboy was one of those hippies...(takes bow).
    I was just watching a documentary on Hunter S. Thompson talking about the hippy counter-culture in '60s San Francisco and I thought of you! Just thought I'd share it (I think it's from one of his books or articles):



    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter S. Thompson
    San Francisco in the middle-'60s was a very special time and place to be a part of. But no explanation, no mix of words, or music, or memories can touch that sense of knowing that you were there and alive in that corner of time in the world, whatever it meant.

    It was madness in any direction; at any hour. You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right; that we were winning. And that, I think, was the handle.

    That sense of inevitable victory over the forces of old and evil. Not in any mean or military sense -- we didn't need that. Our energy would simply prevail. We had all the momentum. We were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave.

    So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look west, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark; that place where the wave finally broke... and rolled back.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Woo! I think one of the main differences between the cultural revolution of the '60s and the cultural revolution (if it can be called that) of the late '80s and early '90s is the number of people involved.

    In the '60s, (from what I've heard), the cultural revolutionaries (of which I'm sure you were one, dogboy!) were relatively few in number, yet had a profound effect on the political landscape.

    In the '80s/'90s, the "counterculture" was much more mainstream. It was still an "underground" kind of thing at first, but eventually it completely took over (and quickly became commercialised). The effect it had on culture was more subtle but more pervasive and far-reaching; less political, less radical and more of a social change.

    MDMA had a big effect on promoting equality between people of difference backgrounds (races, classes, sexual orientations), and even football violence dropped as its fans started dropping pills...

    Did you see the documentary? I thought it was pretty interesting... :-)
    You're absolutely right Tiny. There were quite a number of us during the 60's, but we went against the mainstream society. It was almost a class war, teenagers and young adults opposed to the ideology of their parents. In fact, there were a lot of teens who were kicked out of their homes by their parents who not only couldn't understand them, but resented what they stood for. Not only did my parents not understand me, but it's why they took me to a mental facility when they discovered my gay porn and my stash of makeshift diapers. It's how parents reacted to their seemingly strange children.

    The 80's movement was completely different as you so aptly described. I'm glad you landed on its commercialism. The 60's movement was a counter culture movement that went against TV, where as the 80's movement was replicated in terrible sitcoms. Leisure suits and disco where all over TV. An exception to the theory is the Smother's Brothers Show of the 60's. Their show was part of the counter culture, and they were rewarded by CBS with having their show cancelled, even though it was extremely popular.

  8. #8

    Default

    It was taken from "Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson", another great documentary for anyone who's interested:



    Oops! You replied while I was finding that video!

    But yeah... The 80s was funny... How many posh school teachers suddenly thought teaching maths would be more effective through the medium of rap...?

    Well, I take my hat of to you for your radical '60s far-outness and liberal hippyness. A lot changed in the '80s/'90s, but the '60s really needed the change. Society needs a good shaking up every few decades!

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I was just watching a documentary on Hunter S. Thompson talking about the hippy counter-culture in '60s San Francisco and I thought of you! Just thought I'd share it (I think it's from one of his books or articles):
    I remember the Hait-Ashbury movement well. Out of it came great rock groups like "The Jefferson Airplane" and "The Mommas and the Pappas". Rock in the 60's had so much to say about the injustices of our society, as well as the drug culture and free love without guilt. It changed the world, especially as the U. K. took leadership roles with groups like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, to name but a few. I could go on and on, but I guess I'll save it for my Doctorate...haha.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I was just watching a documentary on Hunter S. Thompson talking about the hippy counter-culture in '60s San Francisco and I thought of you! Just thought I'd share it (I think it's from one of his books or articles):
    I remember the Hait-Ashbury movement well. Out of it came great rock groups like "The Jefferson Airplane" and "The Mommas and the Pappas". Rock in the 60's had so much to say about the injustices of our society, as well as the drug culture and free love without guilt. It changed the world, especially as the U. K. took leadership roles with groups like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, to name but a few. I could go on and on, but I guess I'll save it for my Doctorate...haha.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    I remember the Hait-Ashbury movement well. Out of it came great rock groups like "The Jefferson Airplane" and "The Mommas and the Pappas". Rock in the 60's had so much to say about the injustices of our society, as well as the drug culture and free love without guilt. It changed the world, especially as the U. K. took leadership roles with groups like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, to name but a few. I could go on and on, but I guess I'll save it for my Doctorate...haha.
    Totally! It must have been an amazing time to experience; an overthrowing of corrupt, misplaced authority, and a recognition of humanity. I'd certainly like to read your doctorate if you get round to it!

    With the endemic stranglehold of commercialism, I wonder if social revolutions have much of a chance now... or whether we are all slaves to "big business"...?

Similar Threads

  1. Paci in public (at a rave)
    By Pauley in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-Jun-2011, 03:57
  2. face book??? rave????dj????
    By jackalpup in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 12-Jul-2010, 11:46
  3. Furry Rave
    By kite in forum Babyfur / Diaperfur
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2010, 23:40
  4. Industrial (Cyber Goth // Dark Rave) Music
    By Yumi in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2009, 08:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.