Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Mr vs Miss&Mrs.

  1. #1

    Default Mr vs Miss&Mrs.

    I'm not a feminist or anything, i was just thinking. Do any of you find it funny that we call a married woman Mrs. and an un-married woman Miss. While men just go by Mr. Regardless? There is no Mrr. or something for a married man. I just was thinking it sort of makes people more conscious on if a lady is married or not, which is probably attention that they don't care for.

  2. #2

    Default

    I think its just a language quirk its one of those things just so ingrained in our tradition im sure theres an explanation for somewhere why. Im also pretty sure there was a term for an unmarried man at some stage but perhaps it just fell out of use ? I remember when i was younger some of my much older relatives used to address letter to me as Master Andrew ****** so there are other terms for men out there.

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Tyger View Post
    I'm not a feminist or anything.
    Good, those people are total whackjobs. Wanting equal rights for women and whatnot, madness! :P

    Actually, I think 'Ms' was originally created for that purpose: so women had a title like 'Mr' that didn't change whether they were married, or not. And 'Master' used to be used for young men/boys (I remember very well Master Tubby Bear from Noddy, son of Mr and Mrs Tubby Bear X3), but AFAIK was nothing to do with being married or not.

    I also find it pretty funny that 'Messrs' (messers ) is an acceptable plural form of Mister. X3

  4. #4

    Default

    Yeah... The title "Ms." (referring to a woman regardless of marriage status, yet not actually being short for anything in particular) has been steadily gaining in popularity in the UK in the last 20 years (or so it seems to me).

    I always thought that "misses" sounds like a corruption of "mister's", as in "property of the mister"... which sounds terribly arcane (if it's true).

    I know that some women worry that "Ms." sounds a bit standoffish... as if they're deliberately saying, "How dare you ask whether I'm married?! That's none of your business!"... but... it isn't. The only trouble is... "Ms." sounds more like you have a bee in your mouth than a proper word.

    I think it would be pretty cool if there was a mass-protest against the Miss/Mrs titles and women started universally using the title Lady. It sounds so damned classy!

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by CharliePup View Post
    Good, those people are total whackjobs. Wanting equal rights for women and whatnot, madness! :P
    lol, well you know what i mean.



    Quote Originally Posted by CharliePup View Post
    Actually, I think 'Ms' was originally created for that purpose: so women had a title like 'Mr' that didn't change whether they were married, or not. And 'Master' used to be used for young men/boys (I remember very well Master Tubby Bear from Noddy, son of Mr and Mrs Tubby Bear X3), but AFAIK was nothing to do with being married or not.

    I also find it pretty funny that 'Messrs' (messers ) is an acceptable plural form of Mister. X3
    Interesting. So wait, since i am single, i get to go by Master? That is awesome!

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I think it would be pretty cool if there was a mass-protest against the Miss/Mrs titles and women started universally using the title Lady. It sounds so damned classy!
    That would be sweet. I'm going to have to call girls by that. "lady ...."

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by CharliePup View Post
    I also find it pretty funny that 'Messrs' (messers ) is an acceptable plural form of Mister. X3
    Oh, that's easy to explain! There was no clean water supply in the old days, so everyone was perpetually sloshed on beer and gin! No one in the Western world could actually pronounce "Misters", so they put "Messrs" in the dictionary because, if you heard it, that's how you'd assume it was spelt! True fact.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Mr vs Miss&Mrs.

    Well either way they should wash our laundry and do our dishes and cook our food! That's the only thing they are good for!

    Just joking

    I remember a Beavis and Butthead episode where they went to a women's feminist meeting. They wanted to be known as womyn instead of woman or women because they weren't men.

    Anyhow I don't think it's sexist at all... it's just an ancient method for what we have now that is known as Relationship Status on Facebook.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2

  8. #8

    Default

    We had a guy in college who's name was John Bates and we all called him Master....... Yes, true story...honest.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    We had a guy in college who's name was John Bates and we all called him Master....... Yes, true story...honest.
    Ha ha ha! I remember a bloke at school whose surname was McDonald. He was adamant that, if he had a son, he'd call him "Ronald". I'd love to know if he ever did...

  10. #10

    Default

    My dad's attorney friend used to call me 'Master'. I thought it was cool to get my own title, although I've always liked Miss better x.x;.

    As far as the Mrs. thing goes, Wikipedia says:

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Mrs. originated as a contraction of the honorific Mistress, the feminine of Mister, or Master, which was originally applied to both married and unmarried women. The split into Mrs. for married women from Ms. and Miss began during the 17th century.
    The entry for 'Ms.' is also a pretty interesting read: [link].


    Quote Originally Posted by Tyger View Post
    I'm not a feminist or anything, i was just thinking. Do any of you find it funny that we call a married woman Mrs. and an un-married woman Miss. While men just go by Mr. Regardless? There is no Mrr. or something for a married man. I just was thinking it sort of makes people more conscious on if a lady is married or not, which is probably attention that they don't care for.
    It also puts some focus on age. If a young lady walks into a shop, I'm pretty sure the people working there are going to refer to her as 'Miss', even if she is married. Otherwise, it would be 'Ma'am' (which could be used for women of any age, really). I guess I was thinking more of how the French do it, where it's 'Mademoiselle' for young and unmarried women, and 'Madame' for married and older women. 'Madame' is a respectful term, though, and kind of implies maturity, more so than 'Mrs.' does. 'Mademoiselle' could be used to charm in the same way that 'Miss' could.

    Anyway, to actually get on topic, I guess we don't really need those titles, although I am really fond of 'Mademoiselle', 'Miss', and even 'Lady'. Why don't we just pick our own from now on? :3

Similar Threads

  1. Oh god, I miss her...
    By diaperlover93 in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2010, 02:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.